Global Competency in Education: EDCI397
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What is Global Competence? | Global Teacher Education

What is Global Competence? | Global Teacher Education | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it

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Priscilla Der's curator insight, February 20, 2014 3:11 PM

Global Competency starts with training teachers for the global age. This graphic organizer allows for better comprehension of how Global Competency can be implemented in the classroom especially for pre-teacher candidates as the information out there is sometimes overwhelming. This chart specifically outlines different aspects pertaining to the four modes: Investigate the World, Recognize Perspectives, Communicate Ideas, and Take Action.

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Beyond Zero Tolerance: Achieving a Balance in School Discipline

Beyond Zero Tolerance: Achieving a Balance in School Discipline | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Disruptive behavior continues to be one of the most challenging issues that schools face today. Even one seriously incompliant student can threaten teaching and learning for the rest of the class. An

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Michaela Vila's curator insight, March 6, 2014 12:48 AM

This is an amazing persuasive article that left me thinking we should never expel or suspend students. After this read, I gained insight on the shocking racial discrepancies between the expulsion and suspensions of African American students and white students. At first African American students doubled white students in expulsions and suspensions, but now it more like three and a half times. The zero tolerance is not working, but creating a positive classroom climate does help (in some cases by over 50%). At the end of this article is nine helpful alternative approaches. I was really interested in number nine, by having peer mediation to resolve classroom conflicts. I want to look more into peer mediation because I think it potentially something I want to use in my classroom. 

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The Role of PBL in Making the Shift to Common Core

The Role of PBL in Making the Shift to Common Core | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Editor's note: John Larmer, Editor in Chief at the Buck Institute for Education (BIE), contributed to this post.

The Common Core has embedded within it some Big Ideas that shift the role of teachers

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Priscilla Der's curator insight, February 20, 2014 4:27 PM

Here Project Based Learning is compared to Common Core initiatives  and they both closely relate to one another! The blog provides different ways to integrate PBL into Common Core which is a tremendous sigh of relief to most pre-teacher candidates looking to join the classroom soon with all the reforms amongst us these days.

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The Trouble With Measuring Understanding

The Trouble With Measuring Understanding | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
The Trouble With Measuring Understanding

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA
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8 Essentials of PBL: The Big Delivery….Santa Believes… Do You?

8 Essentials of PBL: The Big Delivery….Santa Believes… Do You? | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Did you know that Santa believes in Project Based Learning? It’s true… in fact I have worked quite hard at finding evidence that supports this conclusion. Recently I was reviewing an outstandin...

Via Beth Dichter, Lauren Yachera
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Becky Vickers's curator insight, February 18, 2014 9:59 AM

This is a great outline of the important elements and goals of PBL. This will be useful when I'm thinking about ideas for classroom projects. Does it do all of these things?

Lauren Yachera's curator insight, February 20, 2014 3:53 PM

Interesting article with a cute graphic about how Santa believes in PBL. Each element of PBL is included with some notes from Santa. I got a smile out of this one!

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The Role of PBL in Making the Shift to Common Core

The Role of PBL in Making the Shift to Common Core | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Editor's note: John Larmer, Editor in Chief at the Buck Institute for Education (BIE), contributed to this post.

The Common Core has embedded within it some Big Ideas that shift the role of teachers

Via Priscilla Der
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Priscilla Der's curator insight, February 20, 2014 4:27 PM

Here Project Based Learning is compared to Common Core initiatives  and they both closely relate to one another! The blog provides different ways to integrate PBL into Common Core which is a tremendous sigh of relief to most pre-teacher candidates looking to join the classroom soon with all the reforms amongst us these days.

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Welcome to Talladega County Schools ::


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Danielle Howard's curator insight, February 28, 2014 12:08 PM

PBL database  organized  by subject

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Howard-Winn Tech Blog: Search results for pbl

Howard-Winn Tech Blog: Search results for pbl | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it

Via Priscilla Der
Emily Deak's insight:

This is a great article and visual representation of how Bloom's Taxonomy engages higher level cognitive understanding  and development in relation to PBL.

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Priscilla Der's curator insight, February 17, 2014 11:44 PM

I found this picture to be of great importance because it incorporates content from my EDMS410 class --Bloom's Taxonomy Revised. Project Based Learning fits into the upper hierarchy of Bloom's Taxonomy and it requires activation of the higher cognitive levels of thinking beyond that of just Remember and Understand (factual knowledge) to Apply, Analyze, Evaluate, and Create.

Becky Vickers's curator insight, February 20, 2014 10:24 AM

This is a really great reminder for the reasons why we do PBL. The connection to Bloom'sTaxonomy, revised is super evident. Love the visual representation especially. 

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Educational Leadership:Giving Students Meaningful Work:Seven Essentials for Project-Based Learning

Educational Leadership:Giving Students Meaningful Work:Seven Essentials for Project-Based Learning | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Emily Deak's insight:

This is an article about the seven essential steps for successful project based learning. This article is a great introduction to PBL because it makes a clear distinction between traditional "projects" (if you can even call them that) and the type of projects that would result from year long inquiry. One distinction that I found to be pivotal was that a project is not successful unless it caters to  the students' interests and it fulfills an educational purpose. Giving the students as much agency as possible when it comes to the parameters of the project, I found to be a somewhat risky, but progressive method to take. Risky in two ways: for the possibility of a student doing the bare minimum, or the possibility of becoming  overwhelmed by the freedom. The idea of adjusting the level of agency that the students had in deciding what they wanted to do for the project was a good way to strike a balance between the two types of students mentioned above. I also really liked the idea of presenting the projects to an audience other than just the teacher. It not only is additional motivation for the student, but will help promote communication and demonstrate their knowledge and mastery of the content. Having their work seen and appreciated by others will instill a sense of pride in the student for all that they have accomplished over the course of the project, which in itself is a wonderful thing!

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Common Core: Elementary School

Common Core: Elementary School | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Visit Elementary School classrooms who have begun to adapt to the new Common Core State Standards. Learn what changes Elementary School teachers are making in their teaching techniques to adapt to the new standards.

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Jacqueline Lledo's curator insight, February 20, 2014 8:04 PM

I’ve been learning about common core for a while now and have heard so many pros and cons about the new system.  However, I never really dug deep to see how the common core works or gain my own opinion on the system.  In this video it starts by showing a kindergarten class doing a word problem as a class.  Eventually the students individually create tables and figure out the word problem and discuss their answers with their teacher.  I really like the concepts they showed in this video, how common core allows upper level students to advance while students not at that pace get still learn but slower.  All in all, this is a great video to watch to better understand the purposes of common core, ways to implement it into your own classroom and to not be scared of it!

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20 Tips To Promote A Self-Directed Classroom Culture

20 Tips To Promote A Self-Directed Classroom Culture | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
20 Tips To Promote A Self-Directed Classroom Culture

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Lauren Yachera
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JennaMRyan's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:25 PM

TeachThought provides a list of 20 tips to promote a self-directed classroom culture.  They say a great classroom culture needs to be a place in which:

Safe Place to FailEncourage CuriosityGive your students a voiceUse tiered responsibilityFoster peer supportConsider natural consequencesConfidence buildingModel how to learnDon’t impose limitations

10. Use real life examples of perseverance

11. Teach students how to set manageable goals

12. Teach students how to overcome disappointment

13. Reward attitude, not just aptitude

14. Believe in their abilities

15. Accept the mess

16. Offer reflection after the project is over

17. Give immediate feedback

18. Give both short and long-term assignments

19. Identify obstacles and negative beliefs

20. Let go of the idea that students success reflects on you

 

To me, the only way to establish classroom culture is for it to be self-directed.  Culture is something that is hard to put your finger on because it really is intangible, it is something that has to be taught, transferred, and supported by everyone in the room.  These suggestions are great guidelines for how to think about student success and believing good things for your class.  Some practical suggestions I would like to use for sure, are peer support and giving students a voice.  I believe kids are more inclined to become passionate learners when they feel like they have a voice in what goes on in the classroom.

Lauren Yachera's curator insight, March 7, 2014 1:12 PM

Really insightful tips that help to promote a self-directed classroom culture. I came across a few that I never really considered before: making the classroom a safe place to fail, and considering natural consequences. Both of these go together hand-in-hand when it comes to students attitudes towards not doing as well as they may have expected. Students need to know that it is okay to fail (sometimes, not all of the time!) and that they can bounce back from it. They cannot be afraid of failure; if they are, they may never try new things. It's important to build a nurturing and supportive classroom, where the teacher acts as a neutral supporter (rather than an angry, disappointed one) that encourages the student that everything will be okay. We have to help them if they don't do well, not hurt them even more.

Sophia Vitilio's curator insight, March 13, 2014 9:06 PM

I personally really liked these tips and will definitely be using some of them in my future classroom.  I actually really thought it was different and liked that one of the tips was to make it a safe place to fail.  This is because I feel like everything about school is always about getting good grades and students feel ashamed to get a bad grade, especially a failing grade. This makes it very important to create an environment where it is okay to fail.

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The Power of the Morning Meeting: 5 Steps Toward Changing Your Classroom and School Culture

The Power of the Morning Meeting: 5 Steps Toward Changing Your Classroom and School Culture | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
"The whole morning meeting not only sets a really good tone for the students, but it sets a tone for me." - Teacher in Louisville, Kentucky

When I first learned about the Morning Meeting model, I wa

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA, Lauren Yachera
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Lauren Yachera's curator insight, March 7, 2014 1:17 PM

I really like the idea of a morning meeting in the classroom everyday. It would give me a chance, as the teacher, to learn more about my students and build relationships with them. It also encourages the students to learn more about each other, and create an environment of mutual respect and understanding about one another. I really like that the students would have the opportunity in the morning to communicate and collaborate with each other. The chance to talk to each other and share stories and words allows each student to feel significant and that they're an important part of the classroom community. Although it may take a few weeks to implement the meetings and make them as beneficial and rewarding as possible, I really think it would be a great thing to implement in the classroom.

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10 Team-Building Games That Promote Collaborative Critical Thinking

10 Team-Building Games That Promote Collaborative Critical Thinking | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
10 Team-Building Games That Promote Collaborative Critical Thinking

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7 Global Education Facts & Statistics That Reflect A Changing World

7 Global Education Facts & Statistics That Reflect A Changing World | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
7 Global Education Facts & Statistics That Reflect A Changing World

Via Diane Johnson, Lauren Yachera
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Diane Johnson's curator insight, January 31, 2014 10:04 AM

Additional support for NGSS for ALL students

Lauren Yachera's curator insight, March 3, 2014 9:45 PM

Very insightful. I really liked that they had statistics about what students thought about global issues. Specifically, the article states, "Nearly all (98 percent) of students in a recent survey agreed that a strong understanding of world history and events is critical to developing solutions to a global problem." This shows that students really are interested and understanding in and of the fact that learning about the history and current issues in the world is becoming increasingly important. In a changing society, having this information can benefit the students greatly, whether this be in or out of the classroom. Bilingualism and a knowledge of the happenings of the world is becoming a very valued trait within the international job community, and if we instill these skills within students at an early age, we may be setting themselves up for great things in the future.

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Common Core State Standards: Elementary School

Visit English and math classrooms who have already begun to adapt to the new Common Core standards. See what changes teachers are making in their practice to...

Via Rachel McGrath, Lauren Yachera
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Rachel McGrath's curator insight, February 19, 2014 11:03 PM

I really enjoyed this video, it was beneficial because it discusses the standards for Math and English, but it also discusses how the teachers are learning to implement it in class. This video caused a bunch of reactions for me. The first was with the Math. I really like that students are learning there are more than one way to solve things and that could lead to more than one answer. I become sad when I hear of stories where a student had an answer but they did it a different way than "what the teacher taught" so it was unacceptable. This common core really allows the students to explore multiple ways. Another reaction was that it was nice to build connections between what I am learning in classes now and how other teachers are doing similar things. I am reminded of my high school Spanish teacher who used to always say, "Let's make connections" and I think this really applies here.

Lauren Yachera's curator insight, March 3, 2014 9:53 PM

This was an interesting video to come across. I am still not completely familiar with the Common Core State Standards, so this was insightful to see. I like the fact that the new standards requires students to explain their thinking as they work on and solve problems. This way, if they mess up at a certain part, you can see where they are struggling and help them at that point. This communication component between student and teacher is something that I think will help to build a level of trust and a relationship that will be helpful. The domains part of the standards intrigued me, I thought it was interesting that some of the domains continue on throughout the grades. This indicates to me that these skills are important to understand throughout their education. I also thought that it was interesting that the standards specify "what" the students should be working on and the answer they should get, and it is up to teachers and school as to "how" they should be getting that answer. Since I am a math concentration, this video really gave me a solid understanding of the CCSS. The language arts component of the video also related to some of the practices and strategies that I am learning in some of my other classes, so it was also really helpful to see. 

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8_Cox_ReadBox

8_Cox_ReadBox | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
ReadBox is a decorated shelf at Kensington Elementary School (Georgetown School District) created by librarian Jenny Cox.
Emily Deak's insight:

As technology advances, I think that we as teachers have to try harder and harder to keep kids wanting to read books in their traditional form; the last thing they need is another thing to be electronic. I like the idea of taking something that kids are familiar with, such as a RedBox DVD rental machine, and applying it to something that is deemed traditional, such as a paper back book. It is a way to blend the new with the old, and shed a new light on reading for kids. I think this would be especially appealing to readers who may be overwhelmed by the volumes of books in which they would find in the library. It is limited in its selection, and the addition of the photos on the front helps the give the students something to either look for or forward to!

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Enhance Project-Based Learning with These 10 Powerful Tools

Enhance Project-Based Learning with These 10 Powerful Tools | Global Competency in Education: EDCI397 | Scoop.it
A fun set of Applications (Many Free) for Project Based Teaching and Learning. The contemporary classroom can be rather different than what we were used to
Emily Deak's insight:

I'm so glad to have found this! Even though I have grown up in what is considered to be a tech- savvy generation, I am not as in tuned with technology as I feel I should be. There are so many educational websites online, that navigating and finding to good ones can sometimes be a struggle. This is a great resource for people like me who need a jumping off point in the technological world!

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From Worms to Wall Street: Projects Prompt Active, Authentic Learning - YouTube

You can't tear students at Newsome Park Elementary School away from their schoolwork when it involves in-depth investigations with real-world applications. S...
Emily Deak's insight:

I absolutely love this example of Project Based Learning at Newsome Park Elementary School in Virginia!  When I was first learning about PBL, I  connected to the philosophy behind it, but was having a difficult time imagining how I could apply this to the classroom beyond your typical unit long project. Upon seeing this video however, I was amazed at how attainable PBL became. 

Majors that I took away from this video:

1. Active learning and real world application of what the students are learning.

2. Inviting guest speakers. I think it is really important for students to understand that no one has all the answers (including their teachers). It opens the door for inquiry on the students behalf and that is setting up great habits for the future!

3. Not limiting our students. When I first watched this video, I was amazed at the topics that the students were researching; topics that I would have assumed would be far out of the range for a child their age. The beauty in what Newsome Park is doing, is presenting complex information in a way that is still applicable to their students. So learning about stocks by creating their own businesses and buying/ selling stocks in it. It was eye opening to me because as a future educator, it would be a huge detriment to put a cap on what I thought students were capable of learning. 

All in all, I found this video on PBL to be incredibly helpful and a valuable resource for applying Project Based Learning in my classroom in the future. 

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Kaitlin Roach's curator insight, February 20, 2014 3:53 PM

Example of Project Based Learning in a first grade classroom. Really like how the teacher broke down each step/process. Students seem to be very interested  in subject they are studying. Very hands on approach to learning.