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New Study Identifies Three Strategies for “Having It All” » The Glass Hammer

New Study Identifies Three Strategies for “Having It All” » The Glass Hammer | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
The Glass Hammer is an online community designed for women executives in financial services, law and business. Visit us daily to discover issues that matter, share experiences, and plan networking, your career and your life.

Via Professor JRuiz
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Can it be better?

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How to Connect biology, philosophy, psychology, technology, economics, and law?
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2 Win Nobel Prize For Physics

2 Win Nobel Prize For Physics | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it

Francois Englert and Peter W. Higgs won the 2013 Nobel Prize For Physics on Tuesday for their research into the Higgs boson particle, nicknamed the "God particle."


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Ante Lauc's insight:

Every particle is created by God. Can you accept it?

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Our young people need to study science and technology for a brighter future

Our young people need to study science and technology for a brighter future | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
John Naughton: Britain should take urgent action to nurture the skills necessary for a dynamic, knowledge-based economy

Via Religulous
Ante Lauc's insight:

It is so, but science and technology should be based on ...... What.

i am afraid that  their vision is without God,math at they do not neither want nor know how to connect faith and science.

am I right?

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How to Use Mind Maps to Unleash Your Brain's Creativity and Potential

How to Use Mind Maps to Unleash Your Brain's Creativity and Potential | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
Mind mapping is one of the best ways to capture your thoughts and bring them to life in visual form. Beyond just note-taking, though, mind maps can help you become more creative, remember more, and solve problems more effectively. Whether you're new to mind maps or just want a refresher, here's all you need to know about this technique.

Via Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
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Yes, it is helpful....

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Professors, We Need You!

Professors, We Need You! | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
Academics are some of the smartest minds in the world. So why are they making themselves irrelevant?

Via Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
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Robots and the future of work

Robots and the future of work | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it

The real structural problem of the American labour market can’t be seen close up, so let’s take a few steps back and look at the productivity trap the USA is currently in and the price that Americans are paying right now for technological progress.

 

Moving the factories of the biggest international corporations to cheap labour China, and more recently increasingly to India or Indonesia, isn’t a new phenomenon or one that can be solely observed in the American economy. In the XIX century David Ricardo described his theory of comparative advantage, which states that countries should specialise in the areas where they fare better than others. In the recent decade the United States has taken advantage of increasing globalisation and capital mobility and focused on building an economy based on knowledge, services and new technologies, while production was gradually shifted to countries which could more easily achieve economies of scale. The value added to the economy as a result of a month’s work of a programmer or lawyer is usually higher than that of a car factory worker. In short we can say that the USA is betting on trading intellectual capital for goods produced abroad. As opposed to a factory, whose opening requires large outlays of capital and labour (building the factory, resources, etc.), creating a new job in Silicon Valley involves a minimum amount of labour in comparison to the financial benefits.

 

Technological innovation has become in recent years both the main U.S. competitive advantage and the source of its structural labour market problems. Americans find it increasingly hard to find a job and competition on the labour market is causing ever slower wage growth, which obviously implies lower demand for many types of goods. Additionally, innovation has created an economy based on automation. Apps, software, robots, machines -- they are all effects of innovativeness. American producers of robots are already saying that investments in machines are more profitable than hiring people. Technology enables lower levels of human labour outlays, but the economy doesn’t allow these people to survive.

 

Work first fled to Asia. Currently it is being automated. Will it be gone soon? The global economy is created by machines, which generate and analyse huge quantities of data. Using smart phones or tablets people can work from anywhere on the globe, even on the go. Whole categories of jobs, such as travel agents, are starting to disappear. Ever since the 1980s the functions of stockbrokers are being taken over by intelligent algorithms, which are better than humans in capturing changes in stock prices and thus can earn money on those changes, by digitally buying and selling equity. Computer programs are also being employed to analyze large datasets (Big Data). Even a journalist’s work can be done by an intelligent programme. There will also be reductions in office and administrative work. In this sector work is often repetitive. The digitisation of document flows and using the right programmes could greatly shorten and speed up this work, leading to job reductions of the suddenly not needed humans.

 

Robotisation is the final frontier of the world of work. This is because if a machine can do something, it is only a matter of time before it does this in a cheaper way than a human would. Robots are becoming cheaper and quicker, more precise, which has drawn many economists and advanced technologies specialists to the debate about the disappearance of jobs and substitution of workers by machines. According to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) economists Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, the authors of the book "Race Against the Machine" the coming of the era of cheap production automation is a prelude to dramatic changes on the labour market. Other studies confirm this. In a recently published paper titled: "The Future of Employment: How Susceptible are Jobs to Computerisation” two researchers from Oxford University, C.B. Frey and M.A. Osborne, created a model which calculates the probability of substituting a worker in a given sector. The results of their study can be shocking for hundreds of thousands of people working in transport, production, sales and services. This is because Frey and Osborne have come to the conclusion that 47 percent of active workers may be replaced by machines in the future. Isn’t Burgeon, a machine created by the company Momentum Machines, which is able to replace a kitchen worker and produce 360 hamburgers an hour -- that’s basically one burger every 10 seconds -- the ideal example for this?

 

Turns out it is not! An apocalypse on the labour market will not take place. Robots won’t replace us because until the last human need will remain unsatisfied, there will always be incentives for work. It is work which has created contemporary humans, because due to work they had to climb down the trees and form groups of co-workers toiling, for example, in the construction of a defensive structure, which required learning how to communicate, work together, have empathy for others, to help, acquiring culture and social skills. If not for human needs, including relational needs based on joint work or commercial trade, humans might well still be sitting in trees.  Needs generate inventions, but they also lead to idleness, according to philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre. Likewise robots are the expression of innovativeness and human laziness. No robots work under this definition of the word -- robots only conduct tasks they were programmed to do by humans, who in this way pursue their goals and desires. Therefore the "work" of a robot only boils down to performing mechanical tasks. Real work is based on realising human needs.

 

Work is always for someone or for yourself, in order to fulfil your needs or the needs of someone else. The optimal situation is self-fulfilment coupled with meeting these needs. But if this isn’t the case then meeting someone’s needs is remunerated, usually financially. Needs don’t exhaust themselves. They may well change. 

 

The changes on the labour markets of developed countries have a very strong influence on social structures. The times when these processes could be stopped are firmly in the past. Now all you can do is adapt. Industry will use brains, not muscles. Technological progress will ensure that the biggest barrier to achieving goals will not be technical issues but will reside in human minds. Thus the role of various types of training, services and specialised skills will increase. We will start doing work 2.0 -- flexible, contract-based, hyperspecialised, mobile work demanding the ability to change your qualifications. This work will be based on creativity -- the skill of complex thinking. This is something machines don’t have.

 

In the long run even cheap labour in China won’t be cheap enough to maintain human employment. An increasing number of robots will pervade our lives and work. Resistance to new technologies has always been present and this will remain so in the future. On the other hand history has proven that Victor Hugo was right to say that "nothing can stop an idea whose time has come.” We are bound to progress, and it is up to us whether we win or lose.


Via Khannea Suntzu
Ante Lauc's insight:

Like computers I have expected that with robots we will develop creative work, but now I do know that we first need to love God much more. S. N. Lazarev and Grigorij Grabovoi did help me to accept it. There are more Russians (A. Petrov etc) who are on this way, there are in other nations too, but Russians are the best one, for me.

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Open Colleges Presents Your Brain Map: 84 Strategies for Accelerated Learning

Open Colleges Presents Your Brain Map: 84 Strategies for Accelerated Learning | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
Explore the Open College's interactive brain map to learn about how your brain functions and ways to improve your learning.

Via Beth Dichter
Ante Lauc's insight:

I will try follow it!

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, October 25, 2013 6:14 PM

Love this visual and its explanations~

Mary Cunningham's curator insight, October 26, 2013 9:22 AM

Brains are fascinating - view this map to learn more!

Melissa Jenkins Borchers's curator insight, November 16, 2013 6:11 AM

Especially helpful in science and health classes

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Massive Open Online Courses Trends 2013 Infographic

Massive Open Online Courses Trends 2013 Infographic | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
MOOCs in Higher Education Today 2013 74% of schools currently offer some type of online course. 16% plan to offer one within 3 years. 13% of schools

Via Susan Bainbridge
Ante Lauc's insight:

I like that my dream is better and better realized. I am sad that my countrymen are far from it! 

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Errol Wilson's curator insight, October 19, 2013 8:24 PM

WE are already using Infographic in the CSUSB MSN Program, nice to know we are in the majority.

Eliana Lobo's curator insight, October 21, 2013 2:58 PM

I'm taking a course on instructional design right now on Coursera!

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.1% own 81% of World's Wealth (Chart & Source inside). Is this extreme concentration of wealth a result of automation, whereby the machines we create enable massive productivity increases without a...

* [Chart #1: Global Wealth Distribution](http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/95/Global_Distribution_of_Wealth_v3.svg/580px-Global_Di...

Via Khannea Suntzu
Ante Lauc's insight:

Dishonest people exploit honest ones. It can be changed if we develop learning society. Do we want it?

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Expansion of Massive Open Online Courses in Asia

Expansion of Massive Open Online Courses in Asia | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
FutureGov – Transforming Government | Education | Healthcare (EXPANSION OF MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSES IN ASIA http://t.co/X5Qj08VyKq #MOOC #OER)

Via Susan Bainbridge
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I am happy that Asia will become stronger.

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A Really, Really Well-Written Set Of Classroom Rules

A Really, Really Well-Written Set Of Classroom Rules | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
Ante Lauc's insight:

It is a good way to learn live love and freedom

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Joshua Farber's comment, August 17, 2013 10:51 AM
Interesting. I often try to test rule-sets like this by running them past an anecdotal example - in this case, "how would student texting during class be managed by this poster's rules?" Which may expose a dilemma of application - because students texting during class can get an educator a black mark in an impromptu learning walk or unnanounced observation, and because it can tempt other students who cannot afford to be so distracted to think that texting would be a good idea for THEM, I'd define it as a "problem" - but cannot think of many students who would agree. The primary issue here, then: who defines what is a "problem for someone else"? If teacher and student cannot agree on that category, I see little use - and some distraction and danger - in such a set.
N Kaspar's curator insight, August 20, 2013 9:51 AM

Good post.

mayela perez's curator insight, August 23, 2013 8:15 AM

great to be applied by all teachers

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Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers

Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 17, 2013 7:50 PM

What if instead of giving homework to our students we asked them to come up with ideas? This chart provides a variety of alternative ways to look at homework. The post describes this as "Rather than simply a list of alternatives to homework, it instead contextualizes the need for work at home (or, “homework”). It does this by taking typical classroom situations–the introduction of new material, demonstrating a procedure, etc.), and offering alternatives to traditional homework assignments."

Consider asking your students what they would suggest doing instead of homework. What might you be able to add to these suggestions?

 

Nancy Jones's curator insight, June 19, 2013 6:40 AM

Love this! 21st century learning isn't as much about technology as it is thinking .allowing choices and options like this not only allow students choices but the opportunity for deeper thinking.

Laura Jane's curator insight, December 15, 2013 9:17 PM

I stole this from Jamie, and couldn't agree more! What a great [and practical] resource to have as we go into the final semester of our internships. This chart is chock full of ideas for creating more authentic and less monotonous homework for students. It focuses on reinforcing, and not memorizing. 

 

These strategies could work for all grade levels, to different extents. This again addresses the quality vs quantity debate. One of my favorite examples is to reinforce a skill that has been taught. It suggests that, instead of asking students to solve 10 word probelms to prove that they know a skill, to have them work in groups to solve, model, and present one deeper thinking word probelm.

 

This allows students to work in harmony to formulate their ideas, and is a more productive approach to learning. Although some cognitive struggle is good, too much leads to frustration and defeat. Allowing students to work together helps them to actively participate in student-centered learning, and they can better understand what they've learned. I will definitely be printing this chart to put in my lesson planning binder.

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OERs, MOOCs, and the Future: Stephen Downes

Overview discussing open educational resources (OERs) and massive open online courses (MOOCs) as they relate to the future. Issues considered include varieties

Via Susan Bainbridge
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Is SD autopoietic person? It seems so, at least for me. For you?

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Get Regular Updates on Connectivism

Get Regular Updates on Connectivism | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it

Click the 'follow' button on the top, right.

 

Trying to find posts on a particular aspect of Connectivism?

Click 'filter' tab above and choose an area of interest.

 

Thank you to everyone for the suggestions and 'thank you's'. I appreciate your support!


Via Susan Bainbridge
Ante Lauc's insight:

When we are connected, when is better not to be connected, and how know develop the best strategy?

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Tòfol Tobal's comment, April 1, 2013 9:39 AM
Teaching aplications, new didactics projects
Carlos Newsome's comment, August 26, 2013 12:28 PM
Wow! Simple yet brilliant!
burlysand's comment, September 24, 2013 12:21 AM
Its superior :)
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How would humanity change if we knew aliens existed?

How would humanity change if we knew aliens existed? | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
We have yet to discover any signs of an extraterrestrial civilization — a prospect that could quite literally change overnight. Should that happen, our sense of ourselves and our place in the cosmos would forever be shaken. It could even change the course of human history. Or would it?

Via Religulous
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I d

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More than 100,000 people are taking an online course from Yale. Here’s what it means for the future of education.

More than 100,000 people are taking an online course from Yale. Here’s what it means for the future of education. | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
An online course at Yale offers a window into the future of education.

Via Susan Bainbridge
Ante Lauc's insight:

How to find what is relevant to live love and freedom?

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, February 22, 7:53 AM

Wow! This is an amazing window into the future!

Donna Karlin's curator insight, February 28, 6:26 AM

Harvard and now Yale joins the MOOC world. FINALLY a way to continuously learn without the expense or relocation of having to be on campus without compromising quality education.

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Train Your Brain to Think Like a Creative Genius

Train Your Brain to Think Like a Creative Genius | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
Maria Konnikova, a world-reknown Harvard psychologist and writer, explores what it takes to have a mind capable of matching the fictional detective/genius Sherlock Holmes in her novel Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes.

Via Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
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Victoria Sofia Bell's curator insight, February 17, 9:46 AM

Be the best example students can learn from.

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How to replace your old computer with a new iPad

How to replace your old computer with a new iPad | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
When transitioning from a computer to the iPad there are still a few challenges that you will face along the way. Here are a few steps that may help you leave the personal computer era behind for good.

Via Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
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iPad Air or Retina iPad Mini: Which New iPad Is for You? - Mashable

iPad Air or Retina iPad Mini: Which New iPad Is for You? - Mashable | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it

"It used to be easy to choose what iPad to get. Those who wanted the most power and highest-resolution screen could opt for the full-size iPad; those who wanted something smaller and easier to hold in one hand, the iPad mini. This year, Apple has made the differences between the two devices more minute than ever."

 

 


Via John Evans
Ante Lauc's insight:

When we resolve relation between GAU and ipad we will be nearer to love and freedom.

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Lessons for Schools: 5 Ways To Be More Innovative In The Digital Age

Lessons for Schools: 5 Ways To Be More Innovative In The Digital Age | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it

Luckily, innovation isn’t magic. It can be taught and cultivated with practice. Here are five ways you can develop your mindset and ability to be more innovative.


Via Andrea Zeitz, Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Ante Lauc's insight:

Mind mapping is future for my country. Soon it will be better.

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Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ - Washington Post

Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ - Washington Post | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
The famed psychologist explains why one is not the other though they are often confused.

Via John Evans, Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
Ante Lauc's insight:

For me the most important is moral and emotional intelligence, than cognitive and other that HG did discover.

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Linda L. Rosario's curator insight, October 18, 2013 5:04 PM

Es imperativo leer este artículo escrito por el creador de la Teoría de las Inteligencias Múltiples y su clarificación de que éstas ... ! NO son estilos de eprendizajes!

Tom Hood's curator insight, October 19, 2013 8:35 AM

I am a fan of Gardner and his Five MInds for the Future. This new work is needed and I like the emphasis on designing learning to work with these multiple intelligences. In this world of rapid change and increasing complexity, learning is THE competitive advantage we can control. 

Rhiannon Boyd's curator insight, November 18, 2013 5:33 PM

From the article: 

 "On the basis of research in several disciplines, including the study of how human capacities are represented in the brain, I developed the idea that each of us has a number of relatively independent mental faculties, which can be termed our “multiple intelligences.” The basic idea is simplicity itself. A belief in a single intelligence assumes that we have one central, all-purpose computer—and it determines how well we perform in every sector of life. In contrast, a belief in multiple intelligences assumes that we have a number of relatively autonomous computers—one that computes linguistic information, another spatial information, another musical information, another information about other people, and so on." - HG

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The Lives of 10 Famous Painters, Visualized as Minimalist Infographic Biographies

The Lives of 10 Famous Painters, Visualized as Minimalist Infographic Biographies | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it

Pollock, Dalí, Matisse, Klimt, Picasso, Mondrian, Klee, Boccioni, Kandinsky, and Miro, visually distilled.

 

Each visual biography depicts key biographical moments — births, deaths, love affairs, marriages, birth of children, travel — as well as notable and curious features like handedness (mostly righties, with the exception of Klee), astrological sign, and connections.



Via Salome Tam
Ante Lauc's insight:

We have passed Moderna, owing to  scoop it we can create postmodern society. It can be chaos or freedom! What will be depend upon u

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Massive Open Online Classes Need to Go Back to Their Airy-Fairy Roots

Massive Open Online Classes Need to Go Back to Their Airy-Fairy Roots | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it
This back-to-school season has also brought a wide range of developments in the online education space known as MOOCs: massively open online courses.

Via Susan Bainbridge
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Three Ways MOOCs Will Change Colleges

Three Ways MOOCs Will Change Colleges | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it

From US News and World Report, a view on MOOCs.


Via Alberto Acereda, PhD, Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.
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Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers | Teaching Strategies | Mentoring Minds

Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers | Teaching Strategies | Mentoring Minds | Global autopoietic university (GAU) | Scoop.it

"As we venture into the 21st century, we as a society, are faced with more innovation and challenge than ever before. We now live in an interconnected world, where the Internet and global communications are simultaneously uniting and isolating us as a society. How do we raise critical thinkers to best face the challenges that face our modern society?"


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 4, 2013 7:43 PM

This infographic provides a look at how we may develop 21st century critical thinkers. Using an image of a brain with eight areas that look at skills we need to know how to use,and that correspond with 21st century skills found in the Common Core and the Partnership for 21st Century Skills.

In addition there are six that we as teachers should be doing within our classrooms including:

* Integrate critical thinking skills within and across all content areas

* Establish safe, intellectually risk-free learning environments

* Allow time to develop critical thinking skills.

There is also a section called "Your Students' Path to Critical Thinking" that includes 25 recommendations.

The infographic is also available as a pdf file that you may download in an 11" x 17" version at the website.

davidconover's curator insight, June 7, 2013 6:03 AM

This is another great infographic that I would make a huge print of and hang on my classroom wall.

Undwear Entrepreneur's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:06 PM

Adapt, improve your knowledge & skill sets, or become obsolete!

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NYEdTech

Here a MOOC. There a MOOC. Everywhere a MOOC MOOC!

Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 7:00 PM

Knewton
100 5th Avenue

249 EdTech Innovators Attending

While there has been a lot of turmoil across the K-20 education space, little has spread so rapidly as MOOCs (Massively Open Online Courses). Seen as a financial saving grace for some, and the death of quality education to others, everyone is picking a side.  We want to talk with the organizations making these courses as well as the universities gr...

Check out this Meetup →

While there has been a lot of turmoil across the K-20 education space, little has spread so rapidly as MOOCs (Massively Open Online Courses).

Via Susan Bainbridge
Ante Lauc's insight:

My dream is to reprocess the best professors and connect them tih my best former students. 

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Susan Bainbridge's curator insight, May 28, 2013 6:31 AM

There is a LiveStream link for those you want to view it online.