Girls of Riyadh: women rights
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Princess Ameerah Al-Taweel on Women's Rights, Islam & Giving Back

Saudi Arabian Princess Ameerah Al-Taweel talks to the Wall Street Journal's Lee Hawkins about her efforts to persuade Saudi officials to lift laws that prohi...
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Saudi Arabian Princess Ameerah Al-Taweel talks to the wall street journal's Lee Hawkins about her efforts to persuade Saudi officials to lift laws that prohibit women from driving, her philanthropic efforts around Islam awareness, and what its like to be a princess and a wife of one of the riches, most influential men in the world. Princess Ammerah focus on how she would want to change women rights in Saudi Arabia.She brings the topic about how she wants to change the fact that women cant  drive. She wants women to have more freedom and a voice in their society,   but as she mentions it wont be easy. Saudi Arabia been living their lives   like that for over 3 decades it wont be that easy for them to change their rules that fast. Saudi Arabia is the only middle eastern country that doesn't let women drive, play sports and many other things. Saudi Arabia don't even have an actual reason why they don't let women have the right to do all these things that they are banned not to do. Princes Ameerah wants to led women in the right direction for them to get their rights and as she said not everyone is going to support her but she still want her voice to be heard by around the world.

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Minaret

Minaret | Girls of Riyadh: women rights | Scoop.it
Leila Aboulela's American debut is a provocative, timely, and engaging novel about a young Muslim woman -- once privileged and secular in her native land and now impoverished in London -- gradually embracing her orthodox faith.
Mariam Dhaher's insight:

I choose this book because it looks like an intersting book to read. the book is about a young religiuos girl who lives in london.The girl in the book later on becomes a maid to an upper class family. the girl never dream of becoming a maid, But a coup forces the young woman and her family into political exile in London.later on in the book Najwa the main charcater meets a young book where they fall in love.

 

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Mecca

Mecca | Girls of Riyadh: women rights | Scoop.it
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Mecca is a city in the western of saudi arabia, considered by muslims to be the holiest city of islam. For Muslims, Mecca is a very important and sacred place. All able-bodied Muslims must travel there during their lifetimes to fulfill hajj, or pilgrimage, one of the Five Pillars of Islam. the interseting fact about mecca is the kabaab cover is made all by gold.

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the map of Saudi Arabia

the map of Saudi Arabia | Girls of Riyadh: women rights | Scoop.it
Mariam Dhaher's insight:

saudi arabia is located in the middle east. saudi arabians speak arabic as the main language. saudi arabia is also known as the holly country.  saudi arabia is called the holly country because mecca is located in saudi arabia and mecca is considered by Muslims to be the holiest city of Islam. riyadh is the captial of saudi arabia and its where the book took place at.

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100 Most Powerful Arab Women 2011 - ArabianBusiness.com

100 Most Powerful Arab Women 2011 - ArabianBusiness.com | Girls of Riyadh: women rights | Scoop.it
26 Rajaa Al Sanea Author
Mariam Dhaher's insight:

rajaa is a saudi women and is the author of the book girls of Riydah and i think its fascinhating to see that out of 100 arab women she is 26 out of 100 most powerful arab women in 2011. it was also intersting to see that the book was banned from saudi arab and rajaa got death threats because she was bringing her nation’s women into disrepute.

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A new study finds arranged marriages are happy.

A new study finds arranged marriages are happy. | Girls of Riyadh: women rights | Scoop.it
In the United States, we think we know about arranged marriages: Your relatives choose your husband or wife, or present you with a limited pool of candidates, thereby diminishing your options and,...
Mariam Dhaher's insight:

I thought this article was really interseting. the article talks about a research that they have done about arrange marriages. the article informs the reader that arrange marriages isnt a fail. their are lot of successful marriages, for example the women that they have mention about in the article she is 58 years old indian women who has been married to her husband for 28 years and their marriage was arranged.

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Girls of Riyadh

Girls of Riyadh | Girls of Riyadh: women rights | Scoop.it
Mariam Dhaher's insight:

Riyadh tells a story of four college girls in Saudi Arabia and their love  lives. The story is told by an unknown women telling stories about her
friends in a websites every week. the narrator talks about her friends  which are Sadeem, Qamrah, Lamees and Mashael or known as Michelle each chapter of the novel telling her friends stories and the struggles they go threw with their love life's. The story also shows the way women and men are treated different. it shows how women in Arab culture don't have
freedom as men do. we learn about the culture of Saudi Arabia and their  marriage traditions. this novel is aslo trying to show people around the
world that Arab women parent just lock in the house and are treated like maids it makes us learn about women and the way they leave in there everyday live.

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Women and their daily clothing on the streets of Saudi Arabia

Women and their daily clothing  on the streets of Saudi Arabia | Girls of Riyadh: women rights | Scoop.it
Mariam Dhaher's insight:

this is what all women is saudi arabia has to wear. its called abaya. women in saudi arabia dont have to wear the hijab (which is what muslims women wear to cover their hair) to wear this they are required by law to wear it. i think it takes away women right to wear what it takes away their freedom to express them self.

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BBC News - Saudi child bride drops divorce from 80-year-old man

BBC News - Saudi child bride drops divorce from 80-year-old man | Girls of Riyadh: women rights | Scoop.it
There is surprise in Saudi Arabia after a 12-year-old girl drops her request for a divorce from an 80-year-old man.
Mariam Dhaher's insight:

the article Saudi child bride drops divorce from 80-year-old man tells a
story of a 12 year old girl that childhood got taken away from her because
her father had decided to sell her by marriage to an 80 year old man. there was a dowry of $22,600 paid to the girl father for the marriage. the girl and her mother had asked for divorce, but then they withdraw the divorce saying the girl is going to respect her father wishes. they little girl had said that she had agreed on the marriage and she has no objection. Saudi Arabia has no law against child marriage and this isn't the first case that a little girl childhood had been taking away and being forced to get married. many people are against child marriage. one of many is Princess Adela bint Abdullah, the daughter of King Abdullah bin Saud, is one of many people who said the marriage violated the child's rights.

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What do Saudi women want?(100 TOP GLOBAL THINKERS)

Mariam Dhaher's insight:

This article talks about the women of Saudi Arabia and how they are treated. the women in Saudi Arabia as everyone knows they have very little freedom. they cant even leave the house without a male guardian with them, if it isn't her husband then it has to be a brother, father, cousin or a son. the women of Saudi Arabia have no voice. the way that these women have lived and grew up to be they became weak. weak to say no, weak to forbid a thing. But, yet there are thousand of women in Saudi Arabia trying to fight for there freedom. trying to have a voice and not have a male guardian do everything for them.

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