Girls' Education
36 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

Anti-princess marketing and girls' education: Mercy Academy vs. GoldieBlox

Anti-princess marketing and girls' education: Mercy Academy vs. GoldieBlox | Girls' Education | Scoop.it
Water, water everywhere, and all the boards did shrink. Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink. Princesses: They're everywhere. Over the past decade, marketers have made "princess" a synony...
Mary Glynn's insight:

This blog post talks about how girl is synonymous to princess in the marketing world. It is very hard to find anything girl-related that is not princess-themed. In the blog, Rebecca Hains speaks of anti-princess marketing, and provides two specific examples. The first is an advertisement for an all-girls high school, Mercy Academy, which states, "You are not a princess. Life's not a fairy tale. Don't wait for a prince" telling girls that they will succeed on their own through hard work and dedication. The second example is the new advertisement for the GoldieBlox toys. In the video, three girls build an incredible project and sing about girls wanting to build and think and do things other than being princesses. They want toys that are designed for girls that aren't princess themed. However, Hains does note that the GoldieBlox company does have a toy that is princess-themed making their stance on anti-princess marketing murky.

 

First off, I think it is amazing that anti-princess marketing is happening. I remember going down the toy aisle as a child and seeing so many options for boys to play with and only Barbies and dolls for girls. Why it has taken this long: I don't know. I am just happy that there will be more options available for girls to choose from.

 

In reference to the Mercy Academy advertisement, I think that these are important statements girls need to think about. High school shouldn't be about the boys and relationships. It should be about the stepping stone it will be towards college and their future. Girls need to be confident in being able to take care of themselves and not having to rely on their "prince" to take care of them. Why be dependent on someone else when you can take charge of your own life and your own happily ever after? If I were looking for a high school to go to I would choose Mercy because it would prepare me the best for the rest of my life. It would teach me how to become an independent, intelligent, and secure young woman.

 

As for GoldieBlox, I had actually seen the video advertisement, and thought it was the best commercial I had ever seen. I had no idea that  the toy it was promoting was princess-themed until reading this blog!! I was shocked and disappointed! They could have come up with many alternative storylines for the game, but instead they stuck with the princess theme. However, I still love that GoldieBlox made a toy that will encourage girls to think, "use their brains", and enjoy building and doing activities other than playing dress-up and dolls. They do ot have to listen to society and men like Matt Forney who try to tell girls and womenhow they should act and  where they belong. GoldieBlox and Mercy Academy are educating girls and young women early that their futures aren't limited. They have the freedom to choose what they want to be when they grow up, whether it is a princess or an engineer. The choice is theirs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

Watch A Student Totally Nail Something About Women That I've Been Trying To Articulate For 37 Years

Watch A Student Totally Nail Something About Women That I've Been Trying To Articulate For 37 Years | Girls' Education | Scoop.it
She really nailed this to the wall, didn't she?
Mary Glynn's insight:

This is a video of a young woman, Lily Myers,  presenting her poem, "Shrinking Women." In this poem, Lily addresses the issue of the women in her family "shrinking" while the men in her family grow round. She talks of while men are taught to grow up confident and speak their mind, women are taught to "filter" their thoughts and accommodate and "shrink" into themselves to make room for the men in their lives.

 

I LOVED this video because it is truly reflective of society today. Myers brings up the two interpretations of women "shrinking." Physically, women are told to be skinny and fit, eat low-calorie food and diet. And with each generation it only gets worse. The ideal woman used to have curves and meat on her bones, but today, the ideal woman is one who has abs instead of curves. We are women because of our curves. I do not understand how society has made it so that to be beautiful, women can't indulge in life. We always have to stay in control of our bodies. Why can't we eat what we want, when we want it without being judged by other women and men? Why are we all trying to fit our differently built bodies into the same mold? Why are we aiming for perfection that doesn't exist?

 

Myers also speaks about women's personality "shrinking." She talks of how her brother is taught to speak his mind, and never has to think before he speaks; whereas, Lily has been taught to filter. This is very true. Men are taught to be confident, egotistical, and secure in their being. They tend to not worry about how their words and actions will affect others. They go through life with a high self-esteem. But women are a different matter. We have to "filter." We have to watch what we say, or it will come back to haunt us. We have to be ladies. When men cuss and say raunchy things, it's commonplace. No big deal. But if a woman is to drop a cuss word or say something inappropriate, she is immediately judged and looked down upon. Our actions and words carry more weight which is why we "filter" and "shrink" into ourselves causing our self-esteem to be low.

 

A true woman is confident, intelligent, secure in her self, and is beautiful because she is all of these things. We cannot allow society to "shrink" us and take away our womanhood. We need to take back our curves, our personalities, and our womanhood before we lose it all together.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

Because I Am A Girl Campaign - Raise Your Hand For Education! | Imperfect Women | Celebrity, Style, Women’s Health, Relationships, Career, Parenting, Women, Food and Politics

Because I Am A Girl Campaign - Raise Your Hand For Education! | Imperfect Women | Celebrity, Style, Women’s Health, Relationships, Career, Parenting, Women, Food and Politics | Girls' Education | Scoop.it
Plan is launching a new campaign, “Because I am a Girl”, in their plight against the abuse and ill education of girls and women and the promotion of gender equality.
Mary Glynn's insight:

This is a blog post about the Because I am a Girl campaign which fights the "abuse and ill education of girls and women and the promotion of gender equality." The post also provides statistics of how education changes a girl's life in dramatic ways, and presents ways people can support the campaign and what it stand for.

 

What I like about this campaign and this post is that they are fighting  abuse, ill education, and gender inequality against women and girls. Many campaigns only focus on one of these aspects, but Because I am a Girl understands that the three go hand-in-hand. We have to fight for all three aspects to make any difference. The post states that "150 million girls under 18 have experienced rape or other forms of sexual violence." These girls have been tramatized, and are therefore scared to go to school in fear of facing violence and abuse from teachers and other classmates. Others, like Shabana of the TED Talk will face violence if they try to go to school to achieve an education. Many were not as strong and courageous as her, and did not go to school in fear of getting hurt or killed. So these young women will never achieve a higher education which would have allowed them to escape from the poor quality of life that they currently live.

 

Some will have a partial education that will stop when they reach the age of maturity and marriage which for many is around the age of 15. At this time they will be removed from their studies and peers and forced to live a life of servitude to their husbands. They will always have to depend on their mate to be the "breadwinner" of the family. They will never have the opportunity to accomplish their own goals, or be fully independent due to their incomplete education. 

 

There are those, however, who are able to achieve a complete education and go out into the workforce. But they too will be held unequal in the eyes of society. Gender inequality is still a problem we face today which means that those girls and women who worked so hard to achieve their education will always be a step behind their male co-workers which does not make sense.

 

Therefore, I agree and stand with the "Because I am a Girl" not just because I am a girl, but because abuse, and inequality of any kind is not right; and we are at a  time in society where these injustices can be eliminated. It is time for equality across the board. Now is the time to make it happen.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Glynn from Education of Girls
Scoop.it!

"We Want Quality Education Because We Are Children of Quality" - Forbes

"We Want Quality Education Because We Are Children of Quality" - Forbes | Girls' Education | Scoop.it
Editor's Note: Ann Cotton is the founder and Executive Director of Camfed International, recognised for its best practice in girls’ education and young women’s leadership. This article was published as part of a debate on International Women's Day...

Via Gust MEES, Christine Golden
Mary Glynn's insight:

This article really shows how  a girl's education is her ticket to survival, success, and a better quality of life. I know I am guilty of dreading going to school some days and wishing I didn't have classes. But after reading this article, I understand how lucky I am. I have the PRIVILEGE of gaining an education that will forward my life. I know that I will be able to get a job, make an income, and support myself. Unfortunately, others cannot say the same. There are many young girls and women who dream of going to school, but are stuck at home doing domestic work. Cotton makes a powerful statement: "[A girl's] exclusion from the single opportunity that could transform her life ensures that her own future children will be born into poverty." I think this is an important and valid quote. Without education, one cannot move up in the world and has limited means. Therefore, when an uneducated young woman has children, the cycle repeats itself; they cannot escape from their lifestyle and struggles. This is why it is imperative, girls receive an education as well. Because if we do not allow every child to an education, we are causing them to be stuck in a world of poverty, suffering and dependence. Girls are just as important as boys, and have the same ability to succeed in life - we just need to give them a chance.

 

And for those of us who have the freedom to learn and receive an education, take advantage and learn as much as you can; never take your education for granted because others dream about being in yur shoes.

more...
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

The Case Against Female Education

The Case Against Female Education | Girls' Education | Scoop.it
If you're a girl pursuing anything more than a high school degree, you're in all likelihood wasting your time. Encouraging girls to go to college and grad
Mary Glynn's insight:

The jist of this blog post can be summarized in his opening and closing statements: "If you're a girl pursuing anything more than a high school degree, you're in all likelihood wasting your time...We're here to take you back to the place you secretly long to be, the place where you belong: the kitchen." Yes, this is what he said, and no it wasn't a joke.

 

When I first read this article I could not believe what I was reading. As a woman and a woman earning a college degree, I find this post to be one of the most offensive pieces of writing I have ever read. I  do not understand how one could put an entire gender over the other. Why do men deserve more than women? Why can't women have their place in the workforce? I strongly believe that anyone who wants to learn and who has the drive to learn should be allowed to achieve a higher education without judgment or question. Women have our part in society just as much as men. And while in the past our "job" was to take care of the home, the times have changed. The world has evolved and women now have the ability to CHOOSE what we would like to do with our lives. I have as much respect for the housewife as I do for the female CEO. They both have high demands, and both jobs are stressful in their own way.

 

Also, education opens up a whole other world of opportunities to a person. There gain more knowledge and have more avenues of life to make use of this newly gained knowledge. Women have passion just as much as men, and for some of us, our passion and goal in life is not to be a housewife. Women deserve the right fuel their passion to  achieve their goals in another field of work. There are needs that need to be met in thw world that STEM graduates cannot do. They do not have the knowledge or the experience to deal with these areas, which is the reason we have the liberal arts and the other vast number of degrees; so that these needs can be met properly.

 

Each man and woman has the right to decide their life course, and where they are best suited. No other person can tell them the amount of education they deserve, or their role in life because they do not know what is best and what is right for each man and woman.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

Taliban restrict women's education in Pakistan

Taliban restrict women's education in Pakistan | Girls' Education | Scoop.it
Thousands of young women living in a part of Pakistan once considered the country's most idyllic tourist destination have been prevented from going to school after an order from Taliban forces which have seized control of much of the area.
Mary Glynn's insight:

This international news article speaks about the tense situation occuring in Pakistan. Hundreds of schools have remained closed due to the violent attacks by the Taliban forces. The Taliban has enforced militant control over the nation, and have put an end to thousands of girls' education. Because the Taliban has zero tolerance for disobedience and will behead and torture anyone who goes against them, girls and children do not even attempt to go to school. They are scared that if they try to return to school for an education, they will be killed.

 

I hear on the news all the time about the Taliban and its presence in Middle East, but until I heard Shabana's story and I read this article I did not truly grasp the severity of the situation. Beheadings and assassinations. Bombings and destruction of homes and businesses. All because the Taliban wants to put an end to girls' education. It is terrible that a group of people can prevent not just 1, but 125,000 girls from receiving an education. It baffles me that someone would think that denying another their education is the right thing to do.A girl's education is her way of bettering her life. It is her method of gaining independence and moving up in the world. Every child and person deserves the right to better their life, which they can do through an education. Not only will their education make their life easier, but it will also allow them to help their community, economy, and the lives of those around them. So why would you try and hinder all of the good that can come out of an education?

 

This article  truly made me think about my life, and my freedom to achieve an education. I can go to school without fear of being beheaded, bombed, or shot. It made me think about gender equality in the United States versus gender equality in the Middle East and other nations. Compared to Pakistan, the U.S. has come a long way in bringing about equality for both sexes. We still have some issues to resolve, but here, girls and boys can go to school side-by-side and work together inside and outside the classroom which is a dream for Shabana and many girls in Pakistan and the Middle East. It's just a reminder that I need to make the most of my education and not waste it because others can only wish and dream of having a life like mine.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

Shabana Basij-Rasikh: Dare to educate Afghan girls | Video on TED.com

Imagine a country where girls must sneak out to go to school, with deadly consequences if they get caught learning. This was Afghanistan under the Taliban, and traces of that danger remain today.
Mary Glynn's insight:

Could you imagine having to dress as another person, cover your textbooks with grocery bags, and take different routes every day to go to school while knowing someone would kill you for going to school? This is what Shabana had to deal with every day. She and many other women and girls risked their lives for education, a chance at freedom. This talk shows just how priviledged some of us are, and that we should never take our right of education for granted.

Shabana is an inspiration for all women. She founded SOLA, a boarding school for girls in Afganistan, so she could give the gift of education to other women because "you can lose everything you own, but what remains in your mind stays with you."

 

Education should never be underappreciated and never taken for granted. It is a gift that each of us should use, and we should try to educate others in some way. Shabana is the epitome of using one's education to educate others. But we can all use our education to better others in different ways. Whether it is to teach one's children how to read, to use math skills to give a good tip to the waiter who served you dinner, or to use your education to serve others at your job every single day. I know I am going to use my higher education to teach other children. I know that I am priviledged ot have my education, and I want to share it and give my knowledge to other young boys and young girls. I will be able to inspire my class to learn and make an impact on their life early on, so they will be brave and confident to step up in the world and leave their mark.

more...
No comment yet.