Giordano Bruno
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james joyce biography, giordano bruno,

james joyce biography, giordano bruno, | Giordano Bruno | Scoop.it
Writing to his brother Stanislaus from Rome in March 1907, Joyce mentions that he had witnessed a procession in honour of “the Nolan” – Giordano Bruno, who came from the town of Nola. The procession takes place ...

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1600: Giordano Bruno, freethought martyr

1600: Giordano Bruno, freethought martyr | Giordano Bruno | Scoop.it
On this date in 1600, gadfly philosopher Giordano Bruno was burnt for heresy in Rome’s Campo dei Fiori. A figure of ridicule in the 17th century, Bruno got this statue at the site of his exec...

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The Free Thought of Giordano Bruno.

The Free Thought of Giordano Bruno. | Giordano Bruno | Scoop.it
On February 17th, 1600, Giordano Bruno was burned on the stake, condemned by the tribunal of the Inquisition because of his revolutionary ideas on the plurality (RT @Rit_Filosofici: The Free Thought of Giordano Bruno.

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17th February 1600 – the Death of Giordano Bruno

17th February 1600 – the Death of Giordano Bruno | Giordano Bruno | Scoop.it
Today marks the 413th anniversary of the death of the Italian Renaissance philosopher Giordano Bruno.

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yovisto blog: Giordano Bruno and the Wonders of the Universe

yovisto blog: Giordano Bruno and the Wonders of the Universe | Giordano Bruno | Scoop.it
On February 17, 1600, Domonican friar, philosopher, mathematician and astronomer Giordano Bruno was burned on the stake after the Roman Inquisition found him guilty of heresy.

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Hail, Giordano Bruno! | Magika

Hail, Giordano Bruno! | Magika | Giordano Bruno | Scoop.it
Today marks the burning of Giordano Bruno, #LoriBruno's ancestor, in 1600: http://t.co/38eTtRVm #justice #light

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February 17: Bruno Burned for His Opinions » Freethought Almanac

February 17: Bruno Burned for His Opinions » Freethought Almanac | Giordano Bruno | Scoop.it

It was on this date, February 17, 1600, that Italian philosopher Giordano Bruno was burned to death for his religious opinions at the Campo de’ Fiori in Rome. He was born Filippo Bruno, in 1548, in the Italian town of Nola, in Campania, in the Kingdom of Naples, and received a Neapolitan education. When he entered the Dominican order at San Domenico monastery in 1565, the seventeen-year-old took the name Giordano.


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On the ideas of Giordano Bruno | Open Source Occultism

On the ideas of Giordano Bruno | Open Source Occultism | Giordano Bruno | Scoop.it
On the ideas of Giordano Bruno “Other studies of Bruno have focused on his qualitative approach to mathematics and his application of the spatial paradigms of geometry to language.” Dropping this here so I don't forget ...

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Freethought of the Day

Freethought of the Day | Giordano Bruno | Scoop.it

On this date in 1600, Giordano Bruno (né Filippo Bruno) was executed for heresy. The Italian philosopher was burned alive at the stake at age 52 for refusing to recant heretical ideas. Born Filippo Bruno in 1548, he entered the Dominican Order at Naples at age 15, adopting the name of Giordano. After being accused of heresy, he fled his Italian convent and traveled throughout Europe (1576 to 1592). During two years in England, Bruno wrote and published six dialogs, including "On the Infinite, the Universe, and Worlds" and "The Ash Wednesday Supper." A Copernican, he rejected Aristotelian dogma and challenged entrenched religious teachings, declaring pantheist views. Some academics today regard him as a path-blazing intellectual, others as a victim of his nonconformity. When Bruno returned to Italy in 1592, he was arrested by the Inquisition. Bruno was imprisoned for seven years in the dungeons of Rome, where he was tortured and isolated before being executed.

 

 


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bianca pascall's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:36 AM

A forgotten, yet, important epistemological philosopher on the 'origins of ideas'. "Libertes philosophica." The right to think, to dream, if you like, to make philosophy - Giordano Bruno 

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Lecture: Galileo, Giordano Bruno, and Goethe

Lecture: Galileo, Giordano Bruno, and Goethe | Giordano Bruno | Scoop.it

It is a far cry from the great Zarathustra or Zoroaster, who formed the subject of our last lecture in this series, to the three great personalities who provide the subject matter of our lecture to-day, and the gulf of time which, in our imagination, we are called upon to span is wide indeed. It is a gulf which stretches from a time thousands of years ago, long before our Christian Era. A time which we can only understand by attributing to the human beings existing then a mental outlook utterly foreign to our own. From this distant standpoint of time, we pass to the 16th and 17th centuries of our own era, to the time when that spirit was first kindled which, ever since, has been the source and inspiration of all vital and progressive culture from then to the present day. As we shall see, this spirit, which burnt so fiercely in the 16th and 17th centuries in individuals such as Galileo and Giordano Bruno, found a fresh medium in a personality so near our own times as that of Goethe.

 

 


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