Gifted Education
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Gifted Children’s Strengths Often Present Challenges

Gifted Children’s Strengths Often Present Challenges | Gifted Education | Scoop.it
Gifted Children’s Strengths Often Present Challenges
Julie Newman's insight:

This blog post and visual both are very helpful in understanding the struggles that can come with being a gifted child. This post offers a point of view that I have not seen before. It considers that, while a child's developmental abilities are far beyond their years, their emotional and physical abilities are not. This can cause a lot of frustration for the teacher, the parent, and the child. This situation where a child's intellect are typically "older" than his or her other abilities is known as asynchronous development. One example the post gave that allowed me to put this into perspective was to consider a five year old, with the thinking ability of a fourth grader in a social setting. This child will have difficulty finding friends because the children his age are too immature while the older kids do not take him or her seriously. This example showed me how, not only can giftedness present a academic challenge, but it can also lead to emotional distress and lack of social skills. I think that the visual provided in the blog does an excellent job at describing the strengths gifted children have, and explaining how these strengths can also lead to consequential struggles. One example includes the stregth of a gifted child to have intense and focused particular passions. The visual shows that the flip side of this may be that these passions may be very different from children of similar age, leading to the inability to connect with other children and can lead to bullying if other children believe the gifted child's passions are weird. I think this visual is an important tool for teachers in with gifted students, especially if they are in a regular classroom, because they can use it to understand how some of this child's abilities can effect him or her in a negative way. 

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Coffee for the Brain: Gifted Education vs. Talent Development

Coffee for the Brain: Gifted Education vs. Talent Development | Gifted Education | Scoop.it
Julie Newman's insight:

I think that this blog post reflecting on an article by James R. Delisle made multiple very interesting points referring to gifted education that I had not thought of myself. Delisle's article discusses the new concept of talent development. He claims that gifted education needs to be shifted towards a talent development program because gifted education focuses on a certain child having gifted traits while talent development focuses on this child have certain gifted talent and working to further this talent. This blog challenges this ideal and goes further to question how schools even classify who is gifted and who should join gifted programs. The blog argues that why can't  school's gifted programs be offered to anyone? Let anyone apply and then have a process to identify their talents and to create individualized plans to help foster these talents. This blog also argues that schools have such different ways of classifying who is "gifted", that they playing field is so uneven to begin with. I believe that this blog articulates many interesting points. If schools all classify giftedness differently, than many kids could be overlooked depending on their district. The idea presented about letting everyone apply to gifted programs has me on the fence, however. When this blogger talks about this, she compares it to her basketball team by saying " At my middle school kids come out for a sport because they enjoy it and want to get better. I will have 40 boys on my basketball team this year with skills from amazing athletes to ones that can barely run straight. However, I will make them all work hard and make them all realize their potential. These kids will sprint, run, jump, dive, sweat, and push themselves to be better because they want to." She argues that schools should work this way and take the children who are truly passionate about their talent, and than help them reach their full potential. In this sense, I agree with the blogger because I also think that those who are passionate about fostering a talent will be the one successful at improving. 

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Common Core State Standards: A Good Fit for Gifted Education? | ASCD Inservice

Common Core State Standards: A Good Fit for Gifted Education? | ASCD Inservice | Gifted Education | Scoop.it
Julie Newman's insight:

I found this article very interested because it combined my topic of gifted education with the current debate taking place on the new common core standards. This article addressed how these standards will affect the gifted students. The article explained that the common core standards, like any other standards, are destinations we are heading towards, but do not dictate the road used to get there. Therefore, this article argues the the common core standards are not going to hinder gifted students as long as teachers work to adjust the standards and curriculum to meet student readiness. This means that, like with all standards, "we need to continually assess students to find out their academic strengths and weaknesses in order to adjust the goals to meets individual needs." It is up to the teacher to make the curriculum high quality are rigorous for students. I agree with every idea presented in the article, however, the emphasis put on the teacher to make the coursework match the gifted child's needs is surprising to me. I feel like in a public school setting, it may be very hard for teachers to be able to have the freedom to give different coursework to different students. 

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Reader Question: How Do Private Elementary Schools Handle ...

Reader Question: How Do Private Elementary Schools Handle ... | Gifted Education | Scoop.it
Unlike public schools, which have gifted magnet programs, most private schools handle gifted students on an as-needed basis. The Mirman School is the only private school in Los Angeles specifically for highly gifted kids and ...
Julie Newman's insight:

This blog post is very different from a lot of the others that I have read about gifted education because it focuses primarily on the ways gifted student's abilities are met in private school settings. Unlike public schools, private schools are able to meet the needs of gifted students on an as-needed basis. Students who test above level for certain subjects will be given more advanced work on a individual basis. One common ways teachers do this is splitting kids up into ability groups for certain subjects. Private schools also handle gifted students by providing them with advanced curricula, allowing them to attend classes of higher grade levels, or having students skip grade is necessary. I found all of these empales very interesting because it shows how private schools have more freedom and flexibility towards being able to meet the standards of gifted students. The article also mentioned private schools across the country that are specific to gifted students. This article made me more confident than others that the needs of gifted students are being me. However, it made me feel that gifted students who attend public school might not have as much specialized attention to their needs as those who attend private school do. 

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Are We Failing Gifted Students? | NEA Today

Are We Failing Gifted Students? | NEA Today | Gifted Education | Scoop.it
Either they'll zone out or they'll act out, says Del Siegle, Ph.D., a professor in gifted education and department head of Educational Psychology in the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut and past ...
Julie Newman's insight:

Gifted students need to be engaged in intellectual stimulation or else they will zone out in class. I believe that as teachers, we do our best to inspire every child within our classroom, but when you can't focus on everyone, the students who are ahead rather than behind tend to receive no teacher attention. I learned from this article that studies have shown that these gifted kids receiving no academic attention tend to act out or disengage completely. Before assuming that your student is uninterested or simply a "troublemaker", figure out the source of this behavior. It could be do to lack of academic stimulation many gifted children seek. 

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Is Gifted Education in Crisis? — The Prufrock Press Blog

Is Gifted Education in Crisis? — The Prufrock Press Blog | Gifted Education | Scoop.it
How should we characterize the state of gifted education today? Only one word is sufficient: Gifted education is in crisis. Many schools currently do nothing for gifted students. Of the schools that do provide services, many end ...
Julie Newman's insight:

We hear a lot about what we can do within education to help those less fortunate or in need of special services. I believe that everyone deserves the right to have specialized programs within schools to promote their abilities. Therefore, programs for gifted students is essential to helping them expand on their natural abilities and become the innovative thinkers of the future. The book, Beyond Gifted Education , explains a step by step gifted program to implement in schools to help bright students reach advanced levels of achievement. Through my research I have seen how frustrating it can be fore gifted students in regular programs. Therefore, I believe funding these programs, as mentioned in the artile, is of the upmost importance. 

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Why geniuses don’t need gifted education

Why geniuses don’t need gifted education | Gifted Education | Scoop.it
Public schools don’t foster creativity very well and might find it better to let the gifted do their own exploring.
Julie Newman's insight:

I was very interested in reading this article after just reading the title, because it is the first opinion I have come across that is against special programs for the gifted student. The author of this opinion piece argues that geniuses don't need gifted education because the majority of the exploration they need to foster their growing intelligence is most likely done outside of the house through experience, research, etc. The author refers to psychologist Lewis Terman's IQ studies results that this students with high IQs did not necessarily become more successful later in life. The author also argues that if we look at some of the geniuses in the world, many of them attended normal public school programs. I think this article was very interesting to read because most articles regarding gifted education are arguing that more special programs are needed to foster gifted students talents and needs. I do not necessarily agree with this article. However, I do agree with the argument that this gifted students will still succeed without these special programs. It is not like they are going to lose their giftedness if they are in a regular school program. However, I do believe that these students deserve these special programs. They should not have to sit through classes that are under the ability level just so they can get a diploma. School is about growing, challenging ourselves, and pushing ourselves past our common abilities. While we are able to challenge the regular student, it is not fair for the gifted student to not to receive the same challenge. 

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My view: Ten myths about gifted students and programs for gifted

My view: Ten myths about gifted students and programs for gifted | Gifted Education | Scoop.it
By Carolyn Coil, Special to CNN

Editor’s note: Carolyn Coil is a speaker, educator and author.
Julie Newman's insight:

I found this article very interesting because it tackled a lot of common stereotypes about both gifted children and gifted education. One myth identified is that gifted students can be easily measured by intelligence tests. This article explained that in reality, giftedness is very difficult to measure and these tests often are culturally biased and may reflect ethnicity, socioeconomic status, exposure, and experiences rather than true giftedness. Similarly, many gifted students may not score well on standardized tests, especially those gifted in creative and productive thinking. I found this fact especially interesting because i feel as if we see this theme across all education, not just gifted education, that standardized tests often don't accurately measure someones intelligence or abilities. Another myth this article tackled was that all gifted students are model students. While this is true for some students, there are many others who challenge teachers, do their own things instead of assigned work, and get low grades. I thought this myth was particularly interesting because it shows that if gifted students are not taught properly, they can loose all interests in education. There were many more myths talked about in this article, but the last one that stood out to me the most was that teaching gifted students is easy. This , however, is not true. Teacher's have to learn new skills and techniques in order to teach this type of student and meet their needs. Overall, after reading these articles, i have come to the conclusion that people assume that being gifted means that everything comes easy to you. I do not believe this is true. Gifted students have to work just as hard as any other student, however, they just do this in a very different way. 

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Gifted and talented education: using technology to engage students - The Guardian

Gifted and talented education: using technology to engage students - The Guardian | Gifted Education | Scoop.it
The Guardian Gifted and talented education: using technology to engage students The Guardian Technology opens up spaces for really smart learners to explore: Technologies that include peer-education, learning through discourse, learning (and...

Via TechinBiz
Julie Newman's insight:

This article was a new medium for me because it consisted of excerpts from a live chat with many different professional in the gifted education field. One important topic it discussed was the teachers who teach gifted students. I never really thought about how certain teachers might not be qualified to teach gifted students. This article expressed that gifted students need teachers who are open minded and willing to be challenged by their students. These teachers also need to be able to stretch their thinking because gifted students tend to coast. The majority of this article talked about how technology is an excellent way to stretch a gifted students mind and abilities by opening them up to be able to explore. Technology can also offer personalized learning for these students. While this article made many more arguments on the importance of technology in gifted classrooms, one that truly stood out to me was technologies ability to bridge the gap between poor and rich gifted students. This is because no matter your background, you are given equal opportunity to operate on the same intellectual plane as those from more fortunate homes. I agree with this article 100% because technology can open up so many doors for students who otherwise are disinterested wit work that does not challenge them enough. This article was the first that mentioned the use of technology for the gifted. I found this interesting because most of the articles i discovered discussing to benefits of technology had to do with technology in special education. I think this proves that no matter if you are a gifted student, regular student, or special needs student, technology can open doors for all students to explore and expand their thinking and learning. 

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B Ritt Smetzer's curator insight, February 14, 12:24 PM

IGGY collated some highlights and links from a live chat on the topic of gifted and talented education. This collection discusses the need for teacher training in the area of gifted and talented education. This article speaks about the need to challenge our gt learners and how technology can bridge the gap between the learners. The learning experience can become more personable with technology involved. this writing even begins to talk about how technology can even the playing field for all gt learners no matter what their background is socioeconomically.   I do not agree with them on this matter.  I see what their ideas are for allowing children to be able to create whatever when they are given the technology no matter what is going on at home but this simply cannot level the playing field for these students.  Some students will be more experienced with working with technology due to having many devices of their own at home.  And other children who are less fortunate will be spending most of their time try to figure out how to navigate the web or the program that they are using.  This article made some good points, but rarely went into detail about any one of them specifically.

 

 

Jenkin, M. (2013, December 09). Gifted and talented education: Using technology to engage students. Retrieved February 10, 2016, from http://www.guardian.co.uk/teacher-network/2013/feb/09/gifted-talented-students-education-technology ;

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Educating Nathan: raising a profoundly gifted child

One mother's epic quest to find the right school for her profoundly gifted son.
Julie Newman's insight:
This video was very eye opening to me. Before watching, I feel as if I did not truly understand how frustrating it can be for profoundly gifted students, as well as their parents, to find a school that fits their level of education. I did not realize how much emotional distress can come with being a gifted student. In this video, this student's mother tried a variety of specialized private schools until she and her son moved across the country to attend the Davidson Academy which is unique because it is a public school, but specializes in profoundly gifted students. Now he feels as if he goes to a school where he fits in, rather than feeling like an outcast. This student is 10 years old and is i high school and college level math and science courses. This video truly showed me a different side of gifted education, because it came from the point of view of a student going through gifted education. It made me realize that we truly do not have very many schools or school programs to help those who are profoundly gifted, given that he had to move across the country to find a school to fit his needs.
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Education Week: Search

Must read: Education Week: Parents Press for Attention to Programs for Gifted Students: http://t.co/AHw00VTdnz via @educationweek @TheJKCF
Julie Newman's insight:

Although funding for education is becoming tighter, programs for gifted children need not be overlook as the first to go due to budget cuts. Many gifted students are not challenged in a traditional classroom setting and therefore their abilities are not met. We have to do our best to meet all children's abilities, not just those of lower educational level. These programs are very important in our education system and provide children with greater opportunities they might not receive due to their economic standings.

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