Bilingual gifted children
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Bilingual gifted children
Are bilingual gifted and talented students underrepresented?
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A Success Story: Dual Language Ed

A Success Story: Dual Language Ed | Bilingual gifted children | Scoop.it

My dual language children outperform the rest of the school," says Principal Vivian Anemoyanis. "Their test scores compare well with my gifted-and-talented classes. And the whole school's test scores are among the best in our district."

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Teaching bilingual gifted students

Teaching bilingual gifted students | Bilingual gifted children | Scoop.it

The Picture-Word-Inductive model allows gifted bilingual students to think critically through the use of pictures, understand and learn new concepts, process complex academic material, and interact with their peers.

 

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Sara Miner's curator insight, August 4, 10:43 PM
SPECIAL POPULATIONS: As an English teacher, it's important for me to recognize the potential ESL aspect of gifted education.
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Gifted and Talented Minority Language Students

Educators who work closely with minority language students argue that using standardized IQ tests as a primary measure of giftedness does not fairly accommodate the linguistic and cultural differences of these students. These educators look to identify the "able learner" rather than the more narrowly defined gifted student who scores in the top 3% on IQ tests.

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Schools, society overlook bilingualism's benefits, expert says: 11/02

Schools, society overlook bilingualism's benefits, expert says: 11/02 | Bilingual gifted children | Scoop.it

Valdés, did not look closely at programs designed for gifted and talented students because bilingual Latino children are rarely identified as part of this group. Many of these students are not considered part of the gifted program because the word "Bilingual" is used  to suggest that one is uneducated. 

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Susan Volinski's curator insight, November 14, 2013 10:18 PM

     This is an article published at Stanford University, focusing on Guadalupe Valdés’ perspective on implementing world languages into classrooms. Valdés is an education professor and specializes in Spanish-English bilingualism. Valdés discusses that in most countries, learning and knowing a second language means that one is educated, while in the United States “the term bilingual is used to suggest that you are uneducated. Bilingualism has a bad rap." She compares bilingualism to gifted education, because a knowing a second language is something with which many students do not identify, yet she mentions that many Hispanic students will typically not be found in a gifted and talented program. I don’t understand why in America it seems that if English is not a child's first language, people feel that he or she will not be able to do as well in classes as the other students. It seems as though learning a second language is a bad thing. Many people feel that knowing a second language will complicate learning the English language, when in fact, research has proven the exact opposite. I remember when my brother and I started first grade – our first language being Russian – the teachers wanted to place us in an ESOL classroom on the first day of class, before even determining our English language abilities. I feel that ESOL students and English speaking students should all be put into the same classroom because how will the ESOL students get any better if they are not fully immersed in the language they are trying to learn? By putting the students in a different classroom, it tells the students that they aren’t good enough to be in a regular classroom, when students will adapt and learn quickly. As the article pointed out, “after closely investigating how a group of so-called “at risk” ninth grade Latinos deftly adapted to challenging situations as they interpreted during a series of simulated exercises, Valdés concluded that the students’ abilities fit the current federal definition of giftedness.” Students are more capable than people give them credit, and I believe that knowing English as a second language, or being bilingual should not be a crutch to students, but rather a strength.  

     Valdés shares that these Hispanic students “often bridge cultural and linguistic gaps by becoming unofficial interpreters in their communities," translating what goes on in the school to the home. For example, during parent-teacher conferences, a child can explain what a teacher is saying to a parent if the parent does not fully speak English. This is a big role that children play, and sometimes it goes unnoticed. By closing the gap between the understanding of English and different languages can make learning more successful because there will be less of a language barrier to overcome, and it will allow students, teachers, and parents to be on the same page about information. Additionally, these “unofficial interpreters” can one day become professional interpreters for the United States to bridge the gaps not only within the community, but internationally as well.   

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NAGC - ED Meeting the Needs of G/T Minority Language Students

NAGC - ED Meeting the Needs of G/T Minority Language Students | Bilingual gifted children | Scoop.it

Why Are Minority Language Students Underrepresented in Programs for Gifted and Talented Students? What Are Some Commonly Used Techniques for the Identification of Gifted and Talented Minority Language Students?  and What Types of Programs Are Available for Gifted and Talented Students, and Are They Suitable for Minority Language Students Who Are Selected to Participate?

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Susan Volinski's curator insight, November 14, 2013 10:21 PM

     This is a digest posted by the National Association for Gifted Children discussing how to meet the needs of gifted and talented children who are minority students. Many minority students are gifted and talented, but the way the test was formulated causes middle class children to pass, leaving the minority students behind. The digest mentions that cultural differences can be a factor for why some students are underrepresented by these exams: “Mexican-American child who respects elders, the law, and authority becomes vulnerable in a school system that values individual competition, initiative, and self-direction.” Coming from a culture where the child puts his trust into the elders, I can imagine how different it must be to change from that form of culture to suddenly relying on yourself to do well and become successful.

      The article then provides recommendations for changing the system of gifted and talented to ensure that the system is fair by “broadening the concept of giftedness.” I definitely agree with this because I feel that right now giftedness is measured by how well you perform on an exam. Rather, there should be multiple factors that determine giftedness, and one of them should not be able to be measured through test preparation. Also, is a child that is an exceptional dancer but a terrible test taker not gifted? I believe the whole idea of gifted education is flawed in the idea that we are excluding many forms of giftedness and are focusing on the standard IQ method, which only represents a small number of people who may happen to be gifted, or may just be lucky test takers.

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Dual-Language Education for Gifted Children | Duke TIP

A few school districts now offer dual-language gifted and talented (GT) programs. Interest in these programs is growing, since they bring together the brightest children early in their school careers in a bicultural or multicultural setting and avoid the stigma of traditional, segregated bilingual programs.

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NRC/GT—Spring '97 Newsletter-Building a Bridge: A Combined Effort Between Gifted and Bilingual Education

A major concer of reserchers and educators in gifted education has been the dignificant underrepresentation of linguisticall and/or culturally diverse (LCD) students in gifted and talented programs. There is an absence of adequate assessment procedures and programming for gifted minority students.

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Harvard Educational Review

This article is a summary if Gifted Bilingual Students? A Paradox? by Esther Kogan. She nvestigates the often-overlooked areas of gifted education for bilingual students.

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