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Which Future for Libraries?

GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's insight:

survivor, the library -


"SCENARIOS OF THE FUTURE  -  There are four plausible futures.

  • The first is the "Lean, Mean, Information Machine." This future would arise from concern about the costs of buildings, space becoming too valuable and libraries moving down the list of core priorities for funding.  - Libraries in this future would need to seek funding through philanthropy to supplement government funding. The choices would be: from the user, from community groups, from Federal and Global grants and from corporate sponsorship. With the expected rise in triple bottom line reporting, it was anticipated that corporate sponsorship may become more attractive as libraries would be an easy and safe way to show that they were good corporate citizens – helping young and old. -  The role of some librarians would shift, becoming entrepreneurial, a broker of services and entities (community groups, corporations, city, state and federal authorities). 
  • The second scenario is the opposite of this. Civilizing the world, civilizing ourselves is the foundational purpose of the library. No corporation should fund it, as over time market values would poison human values. - The purpose of the library is that of community builder – providing ideas to all, those who can and those who cannot afford. Books cannot be overlaid with digital sponsorship, purity must be kept.    . . . "  (continues)
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Libraries as Informal Learning Spaces— excerpt from the first Chapman Prize Report + Call for 2013 Prize

Libraries as Informal Learning Spaces— excerpt from the first Chapman Prize Report + Call for 2013 Prize | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
The Call for the 2013 Perry Chapman Prize is live through May only. Respondents are asked to address the question: 
How does the physical campus support instit…

Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's insight:

Library spaces - "The researchers used mapping exercises, student-gathered photographs, surveys, interviews, and design charrettes. Their findings paint a detailed picture of students’ study lives that has implications for institutions that want to make the library relevant to those lives: 

Students are highly scheduled and on the go all of the time. There is no “average” day for a student. Academic, social, recreational, work, volunteer, and personal activities are all in the mix and each day is different. They eat on the go and carry their belongings with them, although they don’t carry their laptops. Students’ schedules are “offset” from librarians’ schedules. Students study in the library, at home/in their dorms, and in the computer lab. They use computer technology throughout the day and in multiple locations.

 The researchers also reported results from the design charrettes that show student needs and preferences:

Flexibility: spaces that meet a variety of needs. Students want to move easily among the spaces. Group and individual study areas are important, as are spaces to relax, a café, and computing and media viewing areas.   Comfort: spaces that provide comfort and have a “family room” atmosphere. This includes easy access to coffee and food, natural light, and an environment with soothing textures, sounds, and great warmth. The space should support sitting, slouching, putting one’s feet up, and lying down.  Technology: technology and tools should be intuitively integrated into the space. This includes high-end technology such as media players, smart boards, and plasma screens as well as low-tech items such as power outlets, staplers, and three-hole punch tools.Staff support: Students rarely made distinctions between the types of staff they needed in the library; rather, they expected to interact with a generic staff member who would be able to provide reference assistance, check out materials, answer IT questions, and brew a great latte. There were very few mentions of a reference or information desk. Librarians cannot assume that they know how students do their academic work or what they need.Resources: students included library materials in their designs, ranging from academic and reference books to leisure magazines and DVDs.  " Ackn. SCUP
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, May 3, 2013 12:49 PM

SCUP will soon publish the monograph, "Research on Learning Space Design: Present State, Future Directions," by Susan Painter, Janice Fournier, Caryn Grape, Phyllis Grummon, Jill Morelli, Susan Whitmer, and Joseph Cevetello. This team received the 2012 Perry Chapman Prize to support their work.


From the introduction to the report from the 2012 recipients:


"Although several hundred articles and a number of books on these topics had been written by the fall of 2012, the field is still at an early stage of development. A first step in creating value from this existing body of work is to gather, summarize, and evaluate how far the field has come in identifying the elements that will allow us to thoughtfully design learning spaces and evaluate their impact. This was the purpose of the project being reported here: a literature review undertaken by a small group of researchers and campus architects/planners who had applied for and been awarded a small grant from the Perry Chapman estate, administered through the Sasaki Foundation in honor of M. Perry Chapman and administered by the Society for College and University Planning."


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New 10 TED Talks to Help You Reimagine Your Business – Stephen's Lighthouse

New 10 TED Talks to Help You Reimagine Your Business – Stephen's Lighthouse | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's insight:

Ackn. Stephen Abram - Stephen's Lighthouse

 

"vulnerability, creativity, innovation, power of introverts, leading tribes, design, urbanization, gaming, imagining the future . . ."

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Bring back shushing librarians

Bring back shushing librarians | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
Library users plead for quiet places to read, write and study — but is anybody listening?

 

Librarians hate to be depicted as bun- and glasses-wearing shushers, hellbent on silencing any and all noisy activities within their sacred domain. Fair enough: Librarians are highly skilled, well-educated and socially aware as a rule, and should not be reduced to a cultural stereotype.  Nevertheless, there’s a lot to be said for that shushing.

 

A recent survey by the Pew Research Center, “Library Services in the Digital Age,” polled a nationally representative sample of what people really want from their libraries.

 

“Quiet study spaces for adults and children” is considered to be a very important element by 76 percent of the population, only one percentage point less than the value given to computer and Internet access. A relatively silent place to read is almost exactly as valuable to these people as the Internet!

 

Almost nine in ten blacks (89%) and Hispanics (86%) consider libraries’ quiet study spaces to be “very important” to the community, making them significantly more than whites (71%) to say this. Additionally, women (81%) are more likely than men (70%) to consider this resource “very important,” as are Americans who have not graduated from college (78%) compared with college graduates (69%). Adults ages 50-64 are also somewhat more likely than other age groups to consider quiet study spaces “very important,” although Americans under the age of 50 are most likely to consider these areas important overall.

 

Those living in urban areas (81%) are also significantly more likely than those living in suburban (73%) or rural (73%) communities to say quiet study spaces are “very important.”

 

According to the Pew study, quiet matters more to library patrons than special programs for kids or job-search resources or access to fancy databases or classes and events or spaces for public meetings. It matters more to them than the ability to check out e-books or engage in “more interactive learning experiences” — areas that many library experts seem to regard as top priorities for the libraries of the future.  More here:  http://www.salon.com/2013/01/31/bring_back_shushing_librarians/

 

You can read more (and download) about the study here:

http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/01/22/part-4-what-people-want-from-their-libraries/

 


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's insight:

bring back 'shusshing" in libraries!!

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Libraries as Informal Learning Spaces— excerpt from the first Chapman Prize Report + Call for 2013 Prize

Libraries as Informal Learning Spaces— excerpt from the first Chapman Prize Report + Call for 2013 Prize | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
The Call for the 2013 Perry Chapman Prize is live through May only. Respondents are asked to address the question: 
How does the physical campus support instit…

Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP), GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, May 3, 2013 12:49 PM

SCUP will soon publish the monograph, "Research on Learning Space Design: Present State, Future Directions," by Susan Painter, Janice Fournier, Caryn Grape, Phyllis Grummon, Jill Morelli, Susan Whitmer, and Joseph Cevetello. This team received the 2012 Perry Chapman Prize to support their work.


From the introduction to the report from the 2012 recipients:


"Although several hundred articles and a number of books on these topics had been written by the fall of 2012, the field is still at an early stage of development. A first step in creating value from this existing body of work is to gather, summarize, and evaluate how far the field has come in identifying the elements that will allow us to thoughtfully design learning spaces and evaluate their impact. This was the purpose of the project being reported here: a literature review undertaken by a small group of researchers and campus architects/planners who had applied for and been awarded a small grant from the Perry Chapman estate, administered through the Sasaki Foundation in honor of M. Perry Chapman and administered by the Society for College and University Planning."


GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's curator insight, May 7, 2013 2:41 AM

Library spaces - "The researchers used mapping exercises, student-gathered photographs, surveys, interviews, and design charrettes. Their findings paint a detailed picture of students’ study lives that has implications for institutions that want to make the library relevant to those lives: 

Students are highly scheduled and on the go all of the time. There is no “average” day for a student. Academic, social, recreational, work, volunteer, and personal activities are all in the mix and each day is different. They eat on the go and carry their belongings with them, although they don’t carry their laptops. Students’ schedules are “offset” from librarians’ schedules. Students study in the library, at home/in their dorms, and in the computer lab. They use computer technology throughout the day and in multiple locations.

 The researchers also reported results from the design charrettes that show student needs and preferences:

Flexibility: spaces that meet a variety of needs. Students want to move easily among the spaces. Group and individual study areas are important, as are spaces to relax, a café, and computing and media viewing areas.   Comfort: spaces that provide comfort and have a “family room” atmosphere. This includes easy access to coffee and food, natural light, and an environment with soothing textures, sounds, and great warmth. The space should support sitting, slouching, putting one’s feet up, and lying down.  Technology: technology and tools should be intuitively integrated into the space. This includes high-end technology such as media players, smart boards, and plasma screens as well as low-tech items such as power outlets, staplers, and three-hole punch tools.Staff support: Students rarely made distinctions between the types of staff they needed in the library; rather, they expected to interact with a generic staff member who would be able to provide reference assistance, check out materials, answer IT questions, and brew a great latte. There were very few mentions of a reference or information desk. Librarians cannot assume that they know how students do their academic work or what they need.Resources: students included library materials in their designs, ranging from academic and reference books to leisure magazines and DVDs.  " Ackn. SCUP
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Twitter / AuntyTech: What do Librarians Need to ...

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Librarians and MOOC's

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Why Libraries Should Be the Next Great Start-Up Incubators

Why Libraries Should Be the Next Great Start-Up Incubators | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
An old idea reinvented for the 21st century.
GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's insight:

"This old idea of the public library as co-working space now offers a modern answer – oneamong many – for how these aging institutions could become more relevant two millennia after the original Alexandria library burned to the ground. Would-be entrepreneurs everywhere are looking for business know-how and physical space to incubate their start-ups. Libraries meanwhile may be associated today with an outmoded product in paper books. But they also happen to have just about everything a 21st century innovator could need: Internet access, work space, reference materials, professional guidance."

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