GIBSIccURATION
607 views | +0 today
Follow
GIBSIccURATION
Scoops relevant to change dynamics of academic information environment -
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC
Scoop.it!

There's a Generation Gap in Your Workplace

There's a Generation Gap in Your Workplace | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
Baby Boomers and Gen X employees are distinctly less engaged than others -- and they make up 88% of the U.S. workforce. Here's what to do about this problem.
GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's insight:

Boomers, Gen X + Millennials:  "For Baby Boomer employees, as well as Generation Xers, engagement is connected to having a strong sense of their company's mission and purpose. Businesses that can find ways to help them understand and embody what their company stands for -- and what it means to them personally -- will keep them engaged or increase their engagement.   

The mobile workforce: Millennials  -  Millennials -- the first to come of age in a culture saturated with mobile technology and social media -- are reportedly changing the marketplace and workplace. Millennials are generally more upbeat about all aspects of engagement than are Baby Boomers or members of Generation X, but Millennials are specifically more positive about growth and development opportunities.   -  And Millennials seem to be more mobile than workers in other generations in one other important way. Despite their higher engagement levels, they are particularly prone to job hopping. Millennials are the most likely of all generations to say they will leave their company in the next 12 months if the job market improves.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC
Scoop.it!

According to Obvious PwC Survey, Millennials Want To Barely Work From Home, If At All | Going Concern

According to Obvious PwC Survey, Millennials Want To Barely Work From Home, If At All | Going Concern | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's insight:

"Among the major findings of PwC's NextGen study:

-- Millennial and non-Millennial employees alike want greater options in their work hours and location. Millennials and non-Millennials alike want the option to shift their work hours to accommodate their own schedule and are interested in working in locations outside the office where they can stay connected by way of technology. Employees across all generations say they would be willing to forego some pay and delay promotions in exchange for reducing their hours.

-- Given the opportunity, 64% of Millennials (and 66% of non-Millennials) would like to occasionally work from home, and 66% of Millennials (and 64% of non-Millennials) would like the option to occasionally shift their work hours.

-- Across the board, 15% of male employees and 21% of female employees say they would give up some of their pay and slow the pace of promotion in exchange for working fewer hours.

-- Millennials put a premium on work/life flexibility. Unlike past generations who put an emphasis on their careers and worked well beyond a 40-hour work week in the hope of rising to the well-compensated ranks of a company later on, Millennial employees are not convinced that such early-career sacrifices are worth the potential rewards. A balance between their personal and work lives is what is most important to them.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC
Scoop.it!

Millennials want jobs that are meaningful to society | SmartPlanet

Millennials want jobs that are meaningful to society | SmartPlanet | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
Millennials are more socially conscious and are looking for jobs that have a positive impact on the world.
GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's insight:

compassion -  " . . . The recession-era 12th grade students surveyed between 2008 and 2010 showed an increase in concern for others and had more of an interest in social issues compared with pre-recession 12th graders surveyed between 2004 and 2006. One example is that students surveyed during the recession were increasingly looking for a job that is “worthwhile to society,” as this graph shows:

The study also found that recession-era youth were more likely to turn down the heat in their home to save energy (63 percent) compared with pre-recession youth (55 percent); more likely to think about social problems (30 percent versus 26 percent); and more likely to use a bicycle or public transit to get to work (36 percent versus 28 percent).

“This is the silver lining of the Great Recession,” said Patricia Greenfield, professor of psychology at UCLA and senior author of the study, in a statement. “These findings are consistent with my theory that fewer economic resources lead to more concern for others and the community. It is a change very much needed by our society.”

more...
No comment yet.