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OIFC : Innovation in Rural India: Treasures from India's Bottom of Pyramid

OIFC : Innovation in Rural India: Treasures from India's Bottom of Pyramid | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
The Bottom of the Pyramid (BoP) in India has emerged as a dominant concept in the Indian businesses.
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INDIA - BoP

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From Poverty to Power by Duncan Green » Blog Archive » Brazil v South Africa: what can the BRICS tell us about overcoming inequality?

From Poverty to Power by Duncan Green » Blog Archive » Brazil v South Africa: what can the BRICS tell us about overcoming inequality? | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
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GINI

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Revealed: How immigrants in America are sending $120 BILLION to their struggling families back home

Revealed: How immigrants in America are sending $120 BILLION to their struggling families back home | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
The amount of money being sent by migrants across the entire world reached $530 billion last year, making it a larger economy than Iran or Argentina, the data from the World Bank showed.
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The $120billion  remittance economy - "For smaller economies across the world, remittances make up massive proportions of national income. For example, Tajikistan receives the equivalent of 47 per cent of its GDP from workers abroad, while Liberia receives the equivalent of 31 per cent."


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AFRICA INVESTMENT-South Africa, the tiny BRIC in the wall

JOHANNESBURG, March 21 (Reuters) - The heartyself-congratulation with which South Africa welcomed itsaccession to the BRIC grouping of major emerging countries hasbeen met with a deafening silence from...
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BRICS - . . ."

lmost all of South Africa's exports to the BRIC states are relatively low value raw commodities while it imports value-added finished goods. The mix is not likely to change, especially when the pay of a South African factory worker is three to six times higher than that of a Chinese worker, who is also more efficient.

The most appealing items South Africa and its neighbours offer the original BRIC states are thecommodities they need to power their economies.

By setting up in South Africa, the BRICS partners can gain access to the regional grouping SADC - Southern African Development Community - 15 countries with a total GDP of around $575 billion and a population of about 260 million, where South Africa is the driving force.

It includes fast growing economies such as Angola, one of Africa's biggest oil producers, Botswana, the world's biggest diamond producer, and Mozambique, with untapped coal reserves that have attracted billions of dollars in investment from Brazilian mining company Vale.

"South Africa extends the group into Africa, strengthening its status as a representative of 'emerging markets' writ large, versus the 'developed markets' which typically dominated multilaterals like the IMF," said Eurasia Group's Rosenberg. (Additional reporting by David Dolan; Editing by Giles Elgood)"

  
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Bertelsmann Stiftung | Press Releases

Bertelsmann Stiftung | Press Releases | GIBSIccURATION | Scoop.it
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Ackn. Bertelsmann Foundation . . . "contrary to the forecasts of success in recent years, the ‘BRICS’ (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) are greatly in need of reform in key political areas. At the same time, their political systems often lack the capacity to reform, which is jeopardising future growth potential. A large-scale international comparative study by the German Bertelsmann Stiftung also comes to the same conclusion.
 
The urgency of the problem and the capacities for reform vary significantly between the five countries.  By comparison, Brazil has the most promising future prospects. Here, major reforms, for example in the fight against poverty and social inequality, were recently implemented. Nevertheless, the socially unjust education system remains a heavy burden for the country’s future prospects. According to the study’s experts, Brazil has made ongoing efforts to strengthen its institutional requirements for good governance and bring them in line with international standards."

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