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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

Via Seth Dixon
Mr Ortloff's insight:

These apartments are so small that they can only be photographed from the ceiling.  Massive urbanization with limited space means that real estate is at a premium and many laborers will not be able to afford large living spaces.  Hong Kong is an extreme example of this and it brings new meaning to the term "high-density housing."

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 11:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 6, 3:34 PM

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This article was making me have a panic attack just looking at the photos. Is space really that limited? How can people live like this and not long live like this also have so much stuff? This is a hoarders dream! Tight spaces and a lot of stuff! Is it really worth it to pay that much to live in Hong Kong? I think I would rather live outside the community and pay to commute rather than be cramped ALL the time. How can the quality of life be great for these people? Tight subways, tight apartments, tight government. Maybe I'm just thinking with my 5'10 mind frame and vase open acreage that is slowing shrinking with new communities being developed but still. Not only sleeping but paying for a 423 Sq. Ft apartment for my entire family would be insane. You could never get a minute to yourself, someone would always be there. I am wondering though if this is the new way of living. Hong Kong and the “new” Arcade apartments in Providence?

James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 3:47 PM

(in-class 4: Hong Kong)

What I take away from this is the theme of supply and demand. Though these condiions seem stereotypically negative, it seems like those who live in the photographed homes are relatvely well off (food, TV, clothing, etc.). This supports the view that living in these tight conditions is less of a choice and more of something that has to be put up with. Now that Hong Kong has been developed 'across', it'd be a good guess to say that recently investments have been made to build 'up' with highrises and skyscrapers (unless like Dubai they sat to mak either own islands, whic geographically would be less likely here). The questionof sustainability is also an issue, i.e. at what point will it be impossible to cram in any more inhabitants? I wonder if a future migration / spreading-out into other areas has started to occur yet or will soon, like the suburbanization which occured in the U.S. after the advent of the automobile. If so, would it be mainland China, despite the political tensions?

GHS Urban Geography
Articles related to AP Human Geography Unit 7: Urban Geography
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The 40 Most Breathtaking Abandoned Places In The World. This Gave Me Chills!

The 40 Most Breathtaking Abandoned Places In The World. This Gave Me Chills! | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
Incredible.
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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.


A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.


Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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Urban Heat Islands Are Helping Kill Trees

Urban Heat Islands Are Helping Kill Trees | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
The warmer conditions cities create make plant-eating pests thrive.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 12:51 PM

Unintended consequences are almost always a surprise, but when considered in context, make sense and probably should have been anticipated.

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Study shows trees save many lives—are tree-huggers onto something?

Study shows trees save many lives—are tree-huggers onto something? | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
The first study to directly link trees' air pollution removal to human health shows that a significant amount of lives are saved and countless respiratory problems averted thanks to trees.

Via SustainOurEarth, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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New York Skyscraper's Separate 'Poor Door' Called A Disgrace

New York Skyscraper's Separate 'Poor Door' Called A Disgrace | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
A developer got tax breaks for creating affordable units in its luxury high-rise, but those tenants will have to use a separate entrance. Officials vow to review zoning laws that allowed the design.
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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.
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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years - Vance Kite

Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years - Vance Kite | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations.
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CH13: Kowloon Walled City

CH13: Kowloon Walled City | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
Hong Kong's Kowloon Walled City was the densest place on the planet before it was torn down 20 years ago. In this Wall Street Journal interactive, you can take a trip through the city, explore its history and hear from the people who lived there.
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Census Estimate Shows New Shift To Urban Core

Census Estimate Shows New Shift To Urban Core | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
New census estimates show that the population of the country is increasing in Western and Midwestern cities.
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9 maps that reveal London's secret history from Shakespeare till today - CNN.com

9 maps that reveal London's secret history from Shakespeare till today - CNN.com | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
From unsolved murders to pagan burial sites, London's shocking history in topographical form
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The Secret Ways Airports Tell Us Where to Go

The Secret Ways Airports Tell Us Where to Go | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
As humans have developed cities and built environments, we have also needed to develop ways to find our way through them. Signage goes back at least as far as the Roman Empire where they constructed "milestones" along their roadways.

Via Suvi Salo, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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By 2060, the American South Could Be Three Times as Urbanized

By 2060, the American South Could Be Three Times as Urbanized | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
Here comes Charlanta the Gargantua.

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 12:56 PM

Predictions are just that, so this is not a guarantee, but we are getting more sophisticated in correctly predicting future trends and consequences. As thinking humans we can influence the future with our actions in the present.

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10 Mega-Cities by 2030!

10 Mega-Cities by 2030! | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it

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Tyler Bennett's curator insight, August 24, 4:29 PM

Estimated population for 2030 in are biggest cities. Do you think this could cause more problems for the world?

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How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away

How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it

"Saying 'you're not welcome here'—with spikes."


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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 2, 8:38 AM

Lack of understanding of mental disability can lead to heartlessness. There is so much that needs to be done.

dilaycock's curator insight, August 3, 3:50 AM

I'd never really taken notice, or heard of some,  of the architectural deterrents mentioned here. I can't believe that we, as a society, go to such lengths to make life even more difficult for those already struggling. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:52 PM

APHG-U7

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How Parking Spaces Are Eating Our Cities Alive

How Parking Spaces Are Eating Our Cities Alive | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
More cities are beginning to scale back on spots, seeing them as wasted space.
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The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010

The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010 | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
Two maps and six charts take sprawl rankings to another level.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 10:19 PM

One of the great results of the decennial census is that geographers, demographers, sociologists, urbanists and countless others, can track the same population or spatial pattern and note historical changes over a 10 year span.  This series of maps and charts highlights some of the major changes.  You shouldn't be surprised that Atlanta is the United States' most sprawling major city and that San Francisco is the most compact, but this article dives beneath surface in a way that is still very accessible.   


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, sprawlneighborhoodplanning, densityplanning

François Arnal's curator insight, June 7, 2:18 AM

L'étalement urbain aux Etats Unis.

 

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CH 14: The Great Green Wall

CH 14: The Great Green Wall | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.
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Sometimes it's hard to distinguish NIMBY from protection

Sometimes it's hard to distinguish NIMBY from protection | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
It's easy to understand why people want to preserve their way of life. After all, it's their way of life. The furor over replacing stop signs with traffic lights along T.C. Jester Boulevard north o...
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A Terrifying, Fascinating Timelapse of 30 Years of Human Impact on Earth

A Terrifying, Fascinating Timelapse of 30 Years of Human Impact on Earth | GHS Urban Geography | Scoop.it
A new interactive project from Google, NASA and the US Geological Survey.
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