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GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography
Articles relating to the AP Human Geography Unit 1: Geography - It's Nature & Perspectives & Unit 2: Population Geography
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Unit 2: For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

Unit 2: For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:43 AM

The wealth of a nation can come from many differnet aspects, jobs land, ecnomy, resoucres, and labor force. In many contries like china and indina they have lots of factorys and factory workers. However what ahppens when the cost of living and transporations go up, should we give workers a pay raise? NO. The answer is to find people who are able to work for cheeper. This lead to the mass influx of mexican factorites and the mass influx of forign workers fleeing to mexico for the jobs and simple life.

It was very interesting to see how even workers form the US were going to mexico in search of jobs becuse ten years ago it was the exact oppisit.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 12:44 PM

As domestic problems increase in countries where the United States have been previously "setting up shop", institutions are rethinking where they outsource manufacturing to.  It is becoming increasingly more expensive to ship goods from China or Europe.  People of all sorts are turning to Mexico, where the United States already has a good manufacturing foundation, to find new opportunities in many different increasingly competitive (globally) sectors.  This is allowing Mexico to be culturally, economically, and socially closer than ever before to many countries around the world.  This large influx of people from all around the world is definitely welcomed, but is being monitored and managed with great care and strategy in order to ensure that this shift benefits everyone.  Mexico is currently very flexible since it is transitioning into a more first-world country; this gives entrepreneurs a great place to start experimenting and migrants a chance to shape Mexico.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 7:39 AM

Foreigners on work visas is a huge and broadening event that is happening throughout the world. Most of the people on work visas have migrated from the U.S. and more now than ever, Europe. With dwelling economies, people are being forced to migrate towards the U.S. and Mexico.

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Unit 2: Interactives: War and Refugees

Unit 2: Interactives: War and Refugees | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 7:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 1:25 AM

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Unit 2: Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style

Unit 2: Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it

"In April, the Associated Press decided the word 'illegal' should only be used to describe actions, not people. It's one of several major news outlets that have been reconsidering how to refer to people who are in this country illegally."  

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 10, 2013 2:16 PM

There is power in the words we choose, especially for those those that are in the media that influence the way we frame any topic.  If a reporter in a news article, for example, were to describe a group as freedom fighters instead of insurgent rebels it impacts our perception of the news. See also this gallery of images on the U.S.-Mexico border


Tagsmigrationethnicity, race, population, podcast.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 21, 2013 9:53 AM
It all goes along with the old saying, the victors write the history books. If the US lost the American Revolution it wouodl probably been called the American Insurrection. Also look at the Civil War as we mostly call it today. Many places, especially in the Southern states call this the War for Southern Independence or the War of Norther Aggression.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 4:19 PM

I thought that NPR broadcast  was perpetuating the problem we face today in news media.  They spent there time talking about certain individuals and how they used their words instead of addressing and informing us about the issue of immigration. Labeling is an easy way of separating a human being from the situation, Illegal immigrant is easier to portray negatively in the news.  An illegal sounds better then a disadvantaged Mexican refuge in search of the same American dream our founding fathers were trying to create when the agenda is to close the boarders

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Migration and Geography


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Tony King's comment, January 13, 2013 8:35 AM
Just in case a lot of perfectly sane Americans decide to migrate to a civilized country like Canada
Trisha Klancar's curator insight, January 13, 2013 11:04 AM

I like this as it also sets up the beginning of the lesson if you were were unsure what to do with this.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 7:07 PM

Migration is what is need in order for the human race to relate to one another and survive. This shows us how we can learn form Migration from a geographical stand point. If you look at the Geography of how and where people move you will it will help you to develop a sense of what is next to come or what is needed to survive.

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Unit 2: Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border

Unit 2: Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it

This lesson plan was specifically designed with Arizona examples and aligned to the Arizona state standards, but it be easily adapted.  I saw a presentation based on this lesson at the NCGE conference as was incredibly impressed.  Also, you'll note that like this one, there are many other lesson plans freely available on the Arizona Geographic Alliance website.  

 

Tags: K12, borders, political, landscape, migration, unit 4 political.


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oyndrila's comment, October 14, 2012 8:40 AM
I found very useful resources on the website. Thank you for sharing it.
Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 12:25 PM

This is an important lesson, especially for those who actually live in Arizona/Mexico and have seen the border itself. Learning about the Arizona/Mexican border is important and shouldn't be left solely to teaching it only in those areas. The maps included in the lesson plan are efficient and could be used in the high school setting.

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Unit 2: What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration?

Unit 2: What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration? | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it
Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, warns that a backlash against immigration would wreak havoc on everything from hospitals to the high-tech industry. The interview is part of the Risk Response Network’s “What if?

 

This is article can be an intriguing introduction to a thought exercise geared towards understanding the economic impact of migration and the social processes that create our world. 

 

Questions to ponder:  Which points of the interviewee do you agree with?  Are there some that you think his analysis is off-base?  What do you think the impacts on a given location would be if there was no migration allowed? 

 

Tags:  migration, economic, unit 2 population, immigration, unit 6 industry, labor.


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Unit 2: American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

Unit 2: American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, August 4, 2013 10:45 AM

Awesome way to show how the settlement of the US continues to move west with the population growing on the West Coast at a faster rate.  If you look at the biggest jump between 1850 and 1860 it shows the mass immigration into the US and the further migration to the western part of the US especailly with the gold rush starting in 1849.  Great littel piece of information.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:23 PM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 7:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

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Unit 2: The changing origins of U.S. immigrants

Unit 2: The changing origins of U.S. immigrants | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it
Back in 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they tend to come from Asia and Africa.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2013 3:04 PM

These statistics only include documented migrants although the number of undocumented migration (mostly from Latin America and the Caribbean) has declined since 2007. 


Tagsmigration.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, June 6, 2013 9:57 AM

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:17 PM

From these statistics i dont think the biggest change is the latin american immigrant population but the european population. The european went from 13% to 8 % of the total make up of immigrant population. Thats a 60% decline, and that tells me that the attraction of living in America has diwendled while the EU market is on the rise. I think this is from the growing economies of the EU market and also the fact that the US has been improving in many of the leading statistics such as education, child care, and quality of life. 

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Unit 2: Britain's New Slogan: Don't Come to the U.K.!

Unit 2: Britain's New Slogan: Don't Come to the U.K.! | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it
An advertising campaign designed to illustrate the drawbacks of living in the U.K. is being planned to deter an expected surge of immigrants, according to reports

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 2:19 PM

With the quota limiting the number of immigrants from bulgria and romania due to expire next year it will give 29 million people the right to not only enter but live and work in Britain. One plan is to force those arriving from Romiania and Bulgiaria to prove that they can support themselves for six months. They are also putting out an advertisment to try to show drawbacks to living in Britian to try and detur people from immigrating in.  

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:07 PM

I find this idea very interesting that due to the economic struggles, a country would try to turn away prospective immigrants.  In a way, we see this with some people in America who try to play the card "the immigrants  take our jobs" but I have never seen it outside our lovely racist country. 

It is similar though, to something that Brazilian citizens have posted on websites saying "Don't come to Brazil" to draw attention to the fact that country is in shambles and if people come to the World Cup and Olympics, it will cause more internal problems for the struggling country. 

I understand the phrase and the reasoning behind it but I do not believe it is a solution to the economic problems.  There should be limits on immigration if a country truly cannot support the amount of people already living in it but people should not be deterred from immigrating to a place if there are still better opportunities there than where they came from.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2:22 PM

It appears the U.K. is designing this campaign due to the fact they are struggling financially and they cannot afford to give benefits to some of the immigrants coming into the U.K., as immigrants are entering at a high rate.

When the Olympics games were hosted in London, the weather was beautiful and the sun was shining almost everyday, (which is rare in the U.K.) That made the U.K. even more attractive to foreigners and potential immigrants. This advertising campaign is displaying the drawbacks of living in the U.K., such as the rainy weather and constant grey skies.  

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Unit 2: UN High Commissioner for Refugees

Unit 2: UN High Commissioner for Refugees | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it
The key facts and figures about refugees, IDPs, asylum seekers and stateless people from UNHCR's annual Global Trends report.

 

Not all migation is voluntary.  Refugees and other non-voluntary migrants often are in their situation due to complex geographic factors beyond their control at the national scale. 

 

Tags: migration, population, development, conflict, statistics, war, unit 2 population.


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Good source for stats on non-voluntary migrants.

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Unit 2: Russians are leaving the country in droves

Unit 2: Russians are leaving the country in droves | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it
Over a bottle of vodka and a traditional Russian salad of pickles, sausage and potatoes tossed in mayonnaise, a group of friends raised their glasses and wished Igor Irtenyev and his family a happy journey to Israel.

 

My regional class has been learning about Russia this week and when I first started teaching a few years ago, I would teach that Russia had a population of 145 million.  Today it is 141 million and part of that is due to migrants leaving a country that they see as lacking in economic opportunities and political freedoms (another part of the story is that birth rates plummeted after the collapse of the Soviet Union in what demographers have called the "Russian Cross").  In the last few years the population appears to have stabilized, but there are still many who do not see a vibrant future from themselves within Russia.  

 

Tags: Russia, migration, Demographics, immigration, unit 2 population.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 8:44 PM

In the last 10 years about 1.25 million russians have emigrated out of Russia, but the way they do it is interesting. When they leave they dont sell their houses, or aparments, or cars they simply lock their doors and quietly slip away to the airports at night. The reasons for leaving are different thought, some are leaving because the prime minister is expected to return while some are leaving because of the awful econonmy. Either way the massive amounts of emigration is leading to a higher death rate then birth rate overall. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 10:23 PM

This article from a couple years ago is about Russian emigration. A large number of Russians were leaving the country for better economic opportunity. Some cite the overbearing rule of Putin, but the pay in other countries is just better than what Russia can offer. This was particularly the case for the more educated, another instance of "brain drain" hurting a nation which is already in trouble.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 9:00 AM

Migration occurs for many reasons. People move from country to country every day. Leaving Russia was this families choice and moving to Israel can have an impact on them greater than if they were to stay in Russia.