GHS Nature of Geography & Population Geography
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GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography
Articles relating to the AP Human Geography Unit 1: Geography - It's Nature & Perspectives & Unit 2: Population Geography
Curated by Mr Ortloff
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Poop Stories

Poop Stories | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:19 PM

It is fascinating that a country so many lives are lost due to something we find simple and trivial, and really do not even think about but use on a daily basis.

Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:49 PM

Often when people are faced with a tragic fact they instantly attempt to shut it out because it makes them uncomfortable. In the same way Americans can walk past five homeless people a day and not bat and eye...its easier. Using comedy to address a dire situation such as India's sanitation standards, is an ingenious way to get people to actually listen

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Unit 2: 12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges

Unit 2: 12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it
Want to learn more about the issues surrounding poverty in the world today? We ve assembled a collection of some of the best data visualizations for just that.

Via Seth Dixon
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Erica Senffner's curator insight, June 9, 2014 11:01 AM

Unit 6

Helen Rowling's curator insight, June 10, 2014 6:37 PM

STUDY OF RELIGION - COMPARISONS OF HAVE & HAVE NOTS.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:45 PM

APHG-Unit 2

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Unit 2: Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Unit 2: Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:33 PM

In my opinion, I do not think that the world could be approaching stage 5. I'm not sure if the world as a whole will ever reach stage 5. Our population is increasing and even though birth rates are low I still think that stage 4 is where we will be stuck. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 2015 6:52 PM

This article discusses the demographic transition model, mostly Stage 5. Stage 5 is still slightly an unknown thing, because many people argue whether there are any countries in that phase or not. Stage 5 is characterized with very low birth rates, low death rates, lots of family oriented planning, and a slow decrease in population. Some people argue Germany is already in this stage, but I don't really agree. 

I think we should focus more on the developing countries that are stuck in stage 2. 

USA is in stage 4, and I believe that we will be stuck here for a while before advancing to stage 5. 

This is a good article for people that are interested in this unit to read, it gives a new perspective on things. 

Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:44 AM

Summary- With his Demographic Transition Model, Warren Thompson suggested that we are in the midst of a transition shown by stage 4, in which birth rates are equaling death rates. But if we analyze the demography in the present day, we will find that we are already past that stage. Most countries in the world are now entering or already in stage 5, in which birth rates are lower than death rates, making it very difficult, if not impossible for the population to grow. These current trends have led to an increased empowerment of women in western countries, since less babies mean more working hours, and more profits. It has also allowed for inter-generational relationships within families, where a children is able to meet his grandparents and even his great grandparents. In Europe, the birth rate is currently below the replacement level. The only way Europe has been able to increase or at least maintain its population is through waves of immigration.

 

Insight- it's is incredible that we are taught that we are experiencing the fourth stage of the Demographic Transition model, and that stage 5 talks about the future. What we may have not noticed is that many countries of the world are already part of that future; they have started to be part of this stage without us realizing it. I really liked the prediction made in the last paragraph. The fertility increase in more developed countries can take us to a new stage 6 in Thompson's model.

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Unit 2: WomanStats Maps

Unit 2: WomanStats Maps | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 7:48 PM
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

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Human Development Index

"This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola)."


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Maggie Naude's curator insight, March 1, 2013 4:32 PM

some emerging markets, Japan

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:38 PM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde

Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:24 AM

HDI

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Unit 2: Global food crisis

Unit 2: Global food crisis | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it
Climate change, changing diets and a growing global population has pushed food security to the top of the international agenda.

 

Food problems are fundamentally geographic.  Understanding local economics, agriculture and development all play a critical role in contextualizing place-based shortages.  This interactive media guide highlights where these issues are the most problematic. 


Via Seth Dixon
Mr Ortloff's insight:

Neo-Malthusian point of view?

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Development: Poop Stories

Development: Poop Stories | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:19 PM

It is fascinating that a country so many lives are lost due to something we find simple and trivial, and really do not even think about but use on a daily basis.

Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:49 PM

Often when people are faced with a tragic fact they instantly attempt to shut it out because it makes them uncomfortable. In the same way Americans can walk past five homeless people a day and not bat and eye...its easier. Using comedy to address a dire situation such as India's sanitation standards, is an ingenious way to get people to actually listen

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Unit 2: Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."


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Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:19 AM

ATTENTION !
Get Paid To Enlighten African Youth On How To Use The Internet To Grow Rich ! Re: Ref:Jobs Are Moving Online, Lets Us Help You Acquire The Skills Of 21st Century and Help You To Be A head Of the Masses in Getting Online Jobs!
http://www.firstandfastcapital.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=690&Itemid=623

Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

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Unit 2: Water and Development

Australia's engagement with Asia: Water - a case study on Flores

Via Seth Dixon
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 2014 8:38 PM

The children of this village were once sick and could not regularly wash their hands due to the fact water was hard to find, and if it was found the quality was poor. World Vision helped by building a pipeline, which brings clean drinking water to this village. They can now bathe regularly and drink clean water.

Having this clean water also benefits the community from an economic standpoint. The abundance of clean water now attracts educators to their village and it also helps with creation of bricks. These bricks can be sold and can be used for their home improvement projects. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:29 PM

This video shows a positive side to globalization.  The Australian organization that worked with the people in these rural villages to get them access to clean water.  The quality of life when up hugely when the people could access water in their homes.  The hours needed to trek to the wells was eliminated and the water have created jobs and better quality of life for the villages.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:48 PM

This is a pretty sad short documentary, it tells of the diseases and the amount of people that go without water. Just to get water women will have to go to a well and walk a couple hours through a forest. Sometimes the well can be dry. The women and children are affected greatly. The women have neck and knee pain from the weight of the water they are carrying and the children are always sick from the poor drinking water so they are constantly missing school.  With permission, the people of the villages were able to engineer a freshwater system that ran through the different villages, a total of 27 kilometers. This made life significantly better than what it used to be. The one thing that really surprised me is that the villagers opted out to pay $120 a year to neighboring villages to keep the water clean and allow them use. 

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Development: A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World

Development: A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it

Want to know where the poor live? Look at where the light isn’t.

 

"Satellite photos of Earth’s artificial lights at night form a luminescent landscape. But researcher Chris Elvidge of NOAA and colleagues from the University of Colorado and the University of Denver realized that they could also illuminate something much darker: the magnitude of human poverty. By comparing the amount of light in a particular area and its known population, they realized that they could infer the percentage of people who are able to afford electricity and the level of government spending on infrastructure development. This allowed them to extrapolate levels of human development—a measure of well-being that includes such factors as income, life expectancy and literacy."


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Development: Economic Inequality

Development: Economic Inequality | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 20, 2013 3:48 PM

Make your own conclusions...

Tony Hall's curator insight, February 20, 2013 11:44 PM

Really good series of infographics on unequal distribution of wealth in the world. Perfect for teaching IB Geography Disparities in Wealth topic.

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Unit 2: UN High Commissioner for Refugees

Unit 2: UN High Commissioner for Refugees | GHS  Nature of Geography & Population Geography | Scoop.it
The key facts and figures about refugees, IDPs, asylum seekers and stateless people from UNHCR's annual Global Trends report.

 

Not all migation is voluntary.  Refugees and other non-voluntary migrants often are in their situation due to complex geographic factors beyond their control at the national scale. 

 

Tags: migration, population, development, conflict, statistics, war, unit 2 population.


Via Seth Dixon
Mr Ortloff's insight:

Good source for stats on non-voluntary migrants.

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