Getting into College and Paying for It
39 views | +0 today
Follow
Getting into College and Paying for It
Tips for the college admissions and scholarship application processes
Curated by Kelsey
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Kelsey
Scoop.it!

7 Considerations When Thinking About Greek Life

7 Considerations When Thinking About Greek Life | Getting into College and Paying for It | Scoop.it
The decision to go Greek in college has benefits and disadvantages, both for students and parents.
Kelsey's insight:

My Thoughts: 

Aside from thinking of only one’s academic goals during college, students should also think ahead of time about their social goals. A major part of many universities’ social scene is Greek life—involvement in sororities and fraternities. With stereotypes about Greek life prevalent, I think that many incoming freshmen are scared away from recruitment; however, I see Greek life as a networking opportunity that can produce great social growth. At many schools, Greek societies host the majority of social events at school; therefore belonging to a Greek organization allows one to attend a variety of events and more importantly meet a variety of people. Also, at many schools the most involved and academically accomplished students are those involved in Greek life, because sororities and fraternities evaluate academic GPA during the recruitment process. Greek life can be a very positive experience for those that are open to participating; I believe that it should be considered as a factor in college decisions more frequently since social growth is such a major part of life during college.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kelsey
Scoop.it!

College Interviews: Do They Really Count Toward Admission?

College Interviews: Do They Really Count Toward Admission? | Getting into College and Paying for It | Scoop.it
Steve Cohen and Mike Muska break down which really matter—and why some colleges are doing away with them.
Kelsey's insight:

My Thoughts: 

My opinion on this article is two-sided. Admissions decisions today rely heavily on students’ demonstration of interest in the school. Many schools site each correspondence that the student has with the university, and they prefer students that take the time to visit the school. I disagree with this, however, because the opportunity to visit schools is largely out of the control of students, especially for those applying to out-of-state schools. Personally, I have experienced frustration with this because I have chosen schools that are far away as my top-choice schools. Though I am extremely interested in these schools, and have met with students and staff at every opportunity I have had, I have been unable to visit them; however, I have equal, if not more, interest in the schools than local students that have visited frequently. On the other hand, I strongly agree with the use of admissions interviews. I believe that in-person interviews allow students to display more character and passion than do resumes and test scores in electronic applications. In the admissions interviews that I have completed, I have actually appreciated the conversations. After spending so much time completing my applications, it felt as if the interviewees were returning the favor by trying to get to know me personally. I think that colleges should place less emphasis on visits and electronic applications and instead judge students on the writing abilities and social skills and intellect that they demonstrate through essays and face-to-face conversations. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kelsey
Scoop.it!

Weighing the Costs in Public vs. Private Colleges - New York Times

Weighing the Costs in Public vs. Private Colleges - New York Times | Getting into College and Paying for It | Scoop.it
As parents and students cope with the ever-rising cost of higher education, many debate whether attending private institutions is worth the expense.
Kelsey's insight:

My Thoughts:

During my search for the right college, one of the major questions that I, as many other applicants, have encountered is whether a public or private university is best for my academic and financial needs. This article weighs the pros and cons of public and private educations. I have come to the conclusion, however, that private schools, in most cases, provide a more well-rounded education. I believe that along with intellectual growth, college is a period during which students gain many of the social skills that they will carry into their adult life. At state schools, class sizes are often between 50-800 students. In a lecture hall this large, save for the several students that consistently choose the seats in the first row, the professor does not recognize let alone know personally his or her students. However, in private schools classes are usually much smaller, ranging from 8 to 45 students. In this more intimate setting, professors are much more available for individual help and are able to address students personally. Developing relationships with professors allows students to develop mature and intellectually-stimulating relationships; the professors are able to act as mentors rather than simply lecturers. The only downside to private universities, in my opinion, is the price tag. Tuition costs are much higher than what is probably necessary. But, to compensate for this, private institutions are often able to offer much more generous financial aid packages to students. Overall, I believe that students should choose schools to apply to schools based on the environment that they desire, rather than the cost of attendance. Private schools value passionate students, so they are usually willing to work with students to provide adequate financial aid.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kelsey
Scoop.it!

The College Essay: Why Those 500 Words Drive Us Crazy

The College Essay: Why Those 500 Words Drive Us Crazy | Getting into College and Paying for It | Scoop.it

My Thoughts:

The college application process have evolved immensely during the past several decades. Admissions decisions have shifted their focus from academic acheivements to demonstration of personal character. Seniors everywhere fear this portion of the application. We are told at every college fair and meeting with college admissions representatives that the essay is the most crucial portion of the application. In fear of these essays, students put them off as long as possible, which often results in a rushed, poorly-written essay. The solution? Students should forget their fear of an imperfect essay and begin at least a rough draft long before the application due date.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kelsey
Scoop.it!

‘How to write the killer college application’

‘How to write the killer college application’ | Getting into College and Paying for It | Scoop.it

My Thoughts:
This article provides a clear demonstration of the difficulty of college acceptance. While historically, academic grade point average was nearly the only factor considered by college admissions faculty members, today students are expected to display a wide variety of interests and strengths as shown by participation in athletics, clubs, leadership, community service, work, and other extracurricular activities. It is understandable why these activities are favorable to see on an application; involvement often directly correlates with strong academics, and most often fosters growth both socially and intellectually. Heavy course loads and busy after school schedules also indicate responsibility and time management qualities in students. However, I think that the college admissions process has long since crossed the line of reasonable. I cannot help but think that colleges place too much emphasis on the rigor of schedules both inside and outside of school. This has made getting into college extremely competitive—those who remain determined are often sleep-deprived and those who cannot afford to spend as much time or money on school-related functions are forced to settle for less prestigious universities, if any. In the meantime though, the admissions process is fully established and students are forced to do their best in it. This book, written by a former Yale University admissions officer provides insight as to how to highlight your true strengths and draw attention away from flawed schedules or grades—a crucial tool for the college admissions process.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kelsey
Scoop.it!

How Colleges Determine Merit Scholarships

How Colleges Determine Merit Scholarships | Getting into College and Paying for It | Scoop.it
See which factors one private school used to determine merit awards.
Kelsey's insight:

My Thoughts:

I find this article very interesting; it enumerates the characteristics that college admission teams value enough to offer money for. The extra money offered for high test scores and good grades in challenging classes were expected; however, I learned that colleges also look at other factors that are not as well known. For example, colleges seek geographic diversity and are willing to offer scholarship money to out-of-state students. This shows that students should not be discouraged by the price for attending college out of state, because colleges are often so eager to represent different regions that they will offer generous scholarships to attract distant students. Another interesting factor is the choice of major in comparison to the percentages of other applicants choosing the same major. This is interesting because typically interests in majors expressed on college applications are not concrete or binding. Often students change their minds about their major upon taking their initial classes. Yet students claiming to choose less popular majors may have a portion of their first year paid for simply for expressing interest in certain majors. Perhaps college applicants should analyze the percentages of students in certain majors when choosing which major to pursue. If it means having your education closer to being paid for, perhaps it is worth it to choose a more peculiar major. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kelsey
Scoop.it!

How To Choose A College That's Right For You : NPR

How To Choose A College That's Right For You : NPR | Getting into College and Paying for It | Scoop.it
The college search doesn't have to begin and end with the Ivies and the name brand schools. Martha O'Connell, the executive director of Colleges That Change Lives, shares some advice for trying to find schools that works for you.
Kelsey's insight:

My Thoughts:

College has become such a personal experience--much more so than to previous generations. Historically, college has been exclusively a 4 to 8 year period used to gain a useful education. Now, however, these years have become a rite of passage for young adults to gain memories and relationships through the "college experience." Many organizations offer services to help students research colleges that will be a good fit for their personal needs. While this may seem trivial to older generations, it is refreshing to me. For students and families to give up so much of their time and money to gain a college degree, I believe that it is important that they enjoy the process. College is a time that allows students to grow immensely; however, if they are inhibited by unfavorable academic or social situations, students may regress in progress. Above the name or popularity of universities, prospective students should consider the mission and values of universities. Soul-searching in your own life will allow you to recognize what is important to you and then find a university that matches these traits. Since first-choice schools do not always work out, I think that it is important for students to remain true to their values, maintain an open mind, and get involved to find their niche at which school they may end up.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kelsey
Scoop.it!

Focus on 7 Strategies to Get Into College

Focus on 7 Strategies to Get Into College | Getting into College and Paying for It | Scoop.it
Measuring up in the admissions game calls for early preparation and using common sense.
Kelsey's insight:

My Thoughts:

The college application process has become such a grueling process. Beginning as soon as elementary school, children are encouraged to set goals for their future and maintain a flawless academic and disciplinary record in order to get into the universities of their choice. However with all students striving for good grades and extracurricular involvement, the definition of “top student” has changed drastically. Now, in order to get into a selective school, students are absolutely expected to have flawless test scores and grade point averages. Students are also expected to have made significant accomplishments in their extracurricular endeavors. Even such involvement is not enough these days, however. A student with exemplary academics, varsity athletic awards, and over 200 hours of community service has a fair chance of being denied admittance to selective colleges. Students must have awe-inspiring accomplishments in order to be included in the 6% of applicants admitted to Harvard, for example. This makes me wonder…what is the true value of the youth years? Since ivy-league aspiring students must begin preparations and resumes as early as elementary school, so much energy is spent on making achievements and so little time given to personal life. In order to even stand a chance, students must choose a heavy high school course load and then spend every spare moment playing sports or volunteering. Where is the designated social time or family time? Children only spend a short 18 years truly with their parents. If 8 of these years are spent studying relentlessly, how are students expected to form true relationships with their families? I find the current college admissions process frustrating. Sure, it’s possible for students to raise $100,000 for a charity that they created, or compose their own symphony piece, but at the expense of family time. I believe that college admissions teams should put less emphasis on the number of AP classes taken and slightly more emphasis on social well-being, that way even the most ambitious of students will be able to occasionally take a break from the non-stop studying to actually live. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kelsey
Scoop.it!

Steven Levy: Getting Scholarships on FastWeb

Steven Levy: Getting Scholarships on FastWeb | Getting into College and Paying for It | Scoop.it

My Thoughts:

With the rising prices of college tutition, students have become desperatte for scholarship money. Businesses observing this trend have responded with advertisements and inauthentic scholarships. Many scholarship search engines have been created to not only give students access to scholarship information but also to give businesses access to students' information. Students fill out full profiles including their academic information, residential information, racial background, and other personal information.While it appears that this information is solely for the purpose of matching students with appropriate scholarships, any businesses affiliated with Fastweb are able to see this information. Surely this site is an efficient way to find scholarships to apply for but students should think twice before publishing personal information.

more...
No comment yet.