Gettin' resourceful in Stage 2 HSIE! - The diversity of groups within and between communities.
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Introduction into the Scoop.it Site!

Introduction into the Scoop.it Site!

Miriam Gergie's insight:

This is an introduction into the scoop.it site that revolves around the outcome CUS2.4 - "Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities", with an embedding of the CUS2.3 outcome "Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities" outcome also with the subject matter "The Diversity of groups within and between communities". The 5 resources that have been posted up are selected while thinking about the inquiry question "How diverse is the world we live in?". With these resources, there are 2 teacher resources and 3 student resources that relate to the topic/subject matter of 'The diversity of groups'. Hope you enjoy the Scoop.it Site!

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National Museum of Australia - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories

National Museum of Australia - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories | Gettin' resourceful in Stage 2 HSIE! - The diversity of groups within and between communities. | Scoop.it
Miriam Gergie's insight:

Having students explore diversity from an Aboriginal Perspective is very important. Gilbert and Hoepper (2011) have said that "Embedding Indigenous perspectives is incorporating Indigenous was of being and knowing, viewing and relating to the world" (p.387). Is is also essential that teachers respect the owners of the land when incorporating such a lesson to students "

An Aboriginal perspective is something that recognises and values Aboriginal culture and identity" (BOS, 2003).

This website holds a wide range of links to Aboriginal history, culture and people. This is an excellent resource when it comes to teaching students about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia and will give students a clear introduction and understanding. 
There is a useful and excellent resource on the website that students can access which is located at the bottom of the page under "Classroom Resources - Batmania: Flash Interactive (http://www.nma.gov.au/engage-learn/schools/classroom-resources/multimedia/interactives/batmania). This online activity is a great way for students to explore and have an understanding of some of the many islands and cultures that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people live in and there everyday life because “Knowledge about Aboriginal people is often derived from popular myths or from media which distorts or omits Aboriginal issues” (NSW DET, 2003, p. 11). This will also give students a brief introduction into the many diverse groups of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia. 

Following this, an interactive Indigenous map of Australia is an excellent resource that will link well with the Aboriginal perspective topic. 
http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/map-aboriginal-australia 
Using this map, it shows the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander regions which are located in red. This is a great way as it gives students a visualisation of the many diverse communities within Australia. It is very important that students have a broad knowledge of these communities around Australia. It is also essential that teachers guide students throughout such a topic and set a task. Teachers can have students in small groups and give them each a region to look at, and have them write a narrative  about their culture, food and everyday life so it gives further information about an idea about their life and how similar there cultures are to there own culture. By introducing students to the topic of Diversity through an interactive, computer based game, engagement and interaction is immediately heightened (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). This will often keep students engaged within classroom activities.
Then, to have students critically thinking, as a whole class, have a brainstorm and have students come up with some ideas about different ways the community can respect and value each other.

 

 Aswell as the CUS2.4 Outcome, this activity also has a link to the CUS2.3 "identity" indicator "identifies some significant customs, practices and traditions of their local community, beginning with Aboriginal people " as students are are looking at it from a cultural diverse perspective, but also embedding the Aboriginal perspective to it.

 

References:

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

New South Wales Department of Education and Training. (2003) Aboriginal Education K-12: Resource Guide. Sydney: Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate NSW DET.

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Australian Bureau of Statistics

Australian Bureau of Statistics | Gettin' resourceful in Stage 2 HSIE! - The diversity of groups within and between communities. | Scoop.it

Via Monique Jamgotchian
Miriam Gergie's insight:

Using the Australian Bureau of Statistics is a great way for students to explore the many religions and cultures throughout Australia. Although, this website would be suitable as a teacher resource as the language and content may be too advanced for a stage 2 class and they may have difficulty understanding some of the concepts and statistics on the page. Using such a website could also give students and idea of the many diverse communities and further broaden their knowledge on diverse communities. This could give students knowledge about religions globally, that are not within their own community.

 

A teaching idea would be for students to find statistics on religions throughout Australian communities and create a pie chart listing these different religions from the largest religious groups, to the smallest throughout Australia. Depending on the level of the Stage 2 students, teacher may provide and display these statistics and graphs on the Interactive White Board for student's to view. This will give students broad information into the many religious groups. It is important that students Select appropriate methods to collect data, construct, compare, interpret and evaluate data displays including tables, pictures, graphs and column graphs -  MA2-18SP, which links in with the Maths Syllabus (Board of Studies, 2012, p.187). Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, p. 111) have emphasised the importance of young learners developing their skills in comprehending, reconstructing and applying given information. This is an excellent task in which students initiate their learning of community diversity using the process of comprehend, reconstruct and apply. For active learning to occur, students need to be actively involved (McInerney & McInerney, 2010, p.9).

 

In addition to this, students can watch a short video which focuses on the Rosh Hashanah and how they celebrate New Years Eve/Day.
http://splash.abc.net.au/media/-/m/154002/rosh-hashanah-what-does-it-mean-?source=early-primary-history. This video will broaden students understanding that every culture has a religion and they all have religious events they celebrate in many different ways. Furthermore, teacher can have students critically think about some of the things they viewed in the video. For example, there was a man blowing a horn in the video which is called a "shofar". Then you can have students research about the "shofar" horn and explain why it's an important part of Rosh Hashanah. 

Furthermore,  students can choose a cultural instrument that is apart of their own religion and explain why it's an important part of their cultural event, how it's used and share this with the class. Students can even bring in a picture to show their class to explore a wide range of religions.

 

This is a great source that Monique Jamgotchian (Scoop.it, 2014) has provided that both teachers and students can play around with and is a great way to have students thinking in a broader perspective about the world they live in. 

 

 

References 

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). NSW Mathematics K-10 Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum. Sydney: DET.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational Psychology: constructing Learning. Sydney: Pearson.

Australian Government Initiative - ABC Splash. (2014). Rosh Hashanah: What does it mean?. Retrieved April 3, 2014 From: 

http://splash.abc.net.au/media/-/m/154002/rosh-hashanah-what-does-it-mean-?source=early-primary-history. 

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Monique Jamgotchian's curator insight, March 27, 2014 1:11 AM

The Australian Bureau of Statistics is a useful website for students wanting to locate specific information relating to the diverse cultural and religious backgrounds of people from communities, and particularly address the Syllabus content descriptor: "identify the various cultural groups that live and work in the local community"

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Australia's emerging communities - YouTube

Latest census data reveal the growing communities that are likely to shape Australia in the 'Asian century'. Who are our four migrant communities who are ent...
Miriam Gergie's insight:

This short video shows the Australias emerging communities. There's a combination of people from different cultures who talk about there own cultures living in Australia. This video clip may be slightly difficult for younger stage 2 learners because it's from a short section of the news, and the language used maybe slightly difficult for their age group, however, it can be used as an excellent teacher resource. Also, Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, p. 109) have indicated that stage 2 students need to construct new meanings of what they already know from a range of different sources. Because it is a visual resource, it may be more powerful and engaging than a written form, so students would have the ability to understand some of the features in the film. Having students watch a short film such as this would create higher order thinking and have them think beyond prior knowledge built from previous lessons. 
 

 A teaching idea, ask students to look through magazines and newspapers and cut out pictures which depict popular aspects of Australian life such as food, music, fashion, sports and art which may have originated in a culture other than their own (Rasim.No.Way, 2012). Then have students label their "cut-outs" with their culture of origin, have them make a collage of these cut-outs, then lead to a discussion by asking student's "How communities have contributed to the Australian way of life?". Students can write down their ideas on a separate piece of paper and present their idea to the class. Teachers may want to begin by writing a few ideas down on the board to give students a better understanding of the question. In addition to the discussion, have students think about different ways in which citizens in communities can value and respect each other in addition to the Syllabus Outcome CUS2.4: Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities (Board Of Studies, 2007). As McInerney & McInerney (2010) have stated that "Teachers need to build on the experiences of there students in order to advance their academic and social development" (p.329). 

In addition to this activity to sum up what they have learned, as a whole class, students can create a mind map of the different religions, celebrations and a cultural tradition for 2 or 3. For example, "Religion", students can then come up one at a time and write the different religions, they can also add a celebration of even this religion celebrates.

 

 

References:


Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational Psychology: constructing Learning. Sydney: Pearson.

Rasim. Noway. (2013). Prejudice No way: Anti-prejudice activities for years K-3. Retrieved on April 7, 2014 From

http://www.prejudicenoway.com.au/year3/2.4.html 


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Multicultural and Indigenous Learning Resources, Cultural Diversity, Child Care Learning Resources, Early Learning Tools - Cultural Calendar

Multicultural and Indigenous Learning Resources, Cultural Diversity, Child Care Learning Resources, Early Learning Tools - Cultural Calendar | Gettin' resourceful in Stage 2 HSIE! - The diversity of groups within and between communities. | Scoop.it
Miriam Gergie's insight:

This website is an excellent way to get students to gather information about significant multicultural celebrations in the local community or in other communities. Since there are a wide range of cultural celebrations that occur throughout Australia in the year, this is a great resource for students to use as it gives them an insight into the importance of celebrating such events and give students a Global Perspective within and between the communities of Australia. This website also has a range of links which students can explore and play around with. 

 

An activity that a teacher could set for students is to have them develop a multicultural calendar or Diary of Multicultural Events.

Have students organise celebrations included in the calendar, highlight the days that are celebrated by students or in the community which will give students a Global Perspective on diversity within the community. The Teacher then can have the students use different colours to highlight the events they do know about, but don't usually celebrate. Rob Gilbert (2011), believes that "studying culture and identity will involve students in a diverse range of learning experiences" (p.288). To continue from this, in small groups, you can have students discuss personal experiences they have participated in with events and share them amongst each other.

 

As an assessment, the teacher can assign each student or in small groups a world culture to research using The Global Education Website (http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/global-issues/country-profiles.html), and have students present their ideas in a poster, chart, or even a mini speech. Have students use images, words, symbols that represent these cultures. Marsh (2010) believes that "assessment can often increase the motivation of students, even though the teacher may not consciously highlight it as an incentive to work hard" (p.313). This also links in with the English syllabus outcome EN2-4A - uses an increasing range of skills, strategies and knowledge to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on increasingly challenging topics in different media and technologies as students need to view, and write down these ideas (NSW Board of Studies, 2012, p.80).

 

Furthermore, to make this activity a memorable and enjoyable lesson and to further explore a Global Perspective view, have students bring in a cultural symbol, object or even clothing that reflects their culture and celebration, have students present this to the class by talking about how it's used in their culture and why it's important for them. This will give their fellow classmates an idea that everyone celebrates these special events in many different ways, and this will also give them an insight into the different cultures in their own classrooms. Having students explore a Global Perspective is important because it gives them "an opportunity to explore important themes such as change, interdependence, identity and diversity, rights and responsibilities, peace building, poverty and wealth, sustainability and global justice" (Global Education, 2011). 

 

 

References:

 

Australian Govertment - Ausaid. (2011). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Carlton South Vic 3053 Australia.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). NSW English K-10 Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum. Sydney: DET. 

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming A Teacher: Knowledge, Skills and Issues. French Forest: Pearson Australia. Heritage, M. (2011). Formative Assessment: An Enabler of Learning. University Of California, Los Angeles. 

 

 

 

 

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Difference Differently

Difference Differently | Gettin' resourceful in Stage 2 HSIE! - The diversity of groups within and between communities. | Scoop.it
Miriam Gergie's insight:

Difference Differently is a great resourceful website that can be used by both Teachers and Students. It has a wide range of great resources which will help give students a better understanding of the many diverse communities within Australia and even in their own classrooms. Using such a website increases students knowledge as it gives them many ways to explore a variety of communities that are within Australia. 

 

A great activity to start students off exploring some of these diverse communities can be used from this website is from the Level 1 'Civics and Citizenships' - getting to know each other. This is a great resource for both teachers and students. This activity gives students knowledge to explore, learn and understand the concept of the diversity of groups within their communities. In addition to this activity, students can work in groups of 3 or 4 and list the similarities and differences between each other in a Venn Diagram to begin as a brainstorm activity and give them a little introduction into the diversity groups amongst each other and in the community. A major reason why teachers opt for using small groups within their classes is that it creates opportunities for student's to develop personally and socially (Benjamin, Bessant & Watts, 1997).


The 'School Playground' section on the website is another excellent way of having students explore a range of diverse communities and embeds well with the first activity to broaden knowledge. It has a range of profiles of children from many diverse cultural backgrounds. This an excellent activity to have students explore and read through the profiles of the children which also has an activity at the end that students can complete to broaden their knowledge. This exercise links well with the English Syllabus outcome EN2-1A communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts (NSW Board of Studies, 2012 p.75). Instead of having students writing a recount about there own cultural backgrounds, teachers could have students role play these stories to the class and then this will lead to a discussion by their fellow students asking them questions such as "How did you feel?", "Are there any cultural similarities between you and the character?". It is essential that students communicate with one another as this will have students sharing their ideas and often feed off one another which creates interaction as, Rika, 1996 has stated that "The best way for teachers to encourage communication from all students is through classroom discussion or small group work".

 

 References:

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). NSW English K-10 Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum. Sydney: DET. 

 

Fleith, Denise de Sonza. (2000). Teacher and Student Perceptions of Creativity in the Classroom Environment. Roeper Review, 22 (3) & 148-153.

 

Marsh, C (2010). Becoming a Teacher: knowledge, skills and issues. French Forest: Pearson Australia. 

 

 

 

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