Geospatial Human Geography
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Geospatial Human Geography
This paper will address human, political, cultural, historical, and socioeconomic processes in a geospatial and cartographic manner.
Curated by Geocrusader80
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Creating American Borders

30-second animation of the changes in U.S. historical county boundaries, 1629 - 2000. Historical state and territorial boundaries are also displayed from 178...

Via Seth Dixon, Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby, Cindi Patten
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Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:36 PM

This video does a fantastic job of showing how the United States has expanded and grown since its original 13 colonies. While many today might imagine that our nation was simply always this size in fact over many years of colonization, land purchases and land grabs America has eventually become what it is today.

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5 Stupidest Things Ever Done With Borders

5 Stupidest Things Ever Done With Borders | Geospatial Human Geography | Scoop.it
Where you find a border, you usually find somebody pissed off about it.

 

Disclaimer: This article is more glib and crude in its language than I typically post.  However there is some great insight in this article about the curiosities that can occur on the borders that merits inclusion here.  Enclaves, walls, roads, glaciers, and tables all play prominent roles in these 5 quirky borders. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Ms. Harrington's comment, July 24, 2012 6:48 PM
Wow, I never knew border issues like this existed! Some are strange, but they live with the issue, like Canusa and the Netherlands/Belgium. Some are high tension, like Pakistan and India. I guess some of these issues are inevitable, the border has to go somewhere, and people over hundreds of years have moved outward.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 25, 2012 7:09 PM
Although some of these boarders were established for security reasons, many more like the one along the American boarder seem to be constructed for more symbolic purposes as a physiological rather than a physical barrier.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:24 PM

Within this article the author said it well, referencing that although these borders just seem silly and "stupid" to us, those who live within these boundaries must have an incredibly frustrating life. Having to hop three-four borders to get to the mainland of your country sounds completely crazy. I'm glad I live in Rhode Island.