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Esri Ireland wins first round of Connected Health initiative

GIS specialist to develop web site and mobile app for local asset management
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Topics for Geospatial techniques and technology
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Mont Blanc panorama becomes the world's largest ever photograph

Mont Blanc panorama becomes the world's largest ever photograph | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
An international team led by photographer Filippo Blengin publishes an enormous 365 gigapixel panoramic photograph of Europe’s highest mountain setting a new record for the world's largest photo
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APOD: 2015 April 21 - Vesta Trek: A Digital Model of Asteroid Vesta

A different astronomy and space science
related image is featured each day, along with a brief explanation.
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NGA: 'Seismic Shift' in Geospatial Intel

NGA: 'Seismic Shift' in Geospatial Intel | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
The world of geospatial intelligence is undergoing a "seismic shift," the head of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) said Tuesday — one that will require a growing reliance on unclassified sources of intelligence.
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Create Space Time Cube—ArcGIS Help | ArcGIS for Desktop

Create Space Time Cube—ArcGIS Help | ArcGIS for Desktop | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
ArcGIS geoprocessing tool that aggregates points by space and time into a netCDF data file.
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Google Lat Long: Mapping Brazilian islands, above ground and under the sea

Google Lat Long: Mapping Brazilian islands, above ground and under the sea | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
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Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 22, 3:09 PM

This article explains how Google Map's street view now allows people to access pictures of Brazil's most beautiful destinations, like dangerous cliffs and perfect white sand beaches that weren't available to access before. The street view also allows people to travel underwater and see pictures of Brazil's beautiful coral reefs and underwater life that they have there to offer.

 

I think that it is so cool that someone could just sit on their couch and look at pictures and underwater views of beautiful places all around the world. We all have technologies like GIS and remote sensing to thank for wonderful developments like this.

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MAP: The Most Popular Beer In Every Country | VinePair

MAP: The Most Popular Beer In Every Country | VinePair | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
See the map of the most popular beer in every country in the world. This
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Story Map Journal - Motion of Tectonic Plats

Story Map Journal - Motion of Tectonic Plats | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Story Map Journal application in ArcGIS Online.
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This Map Shows Where the Happiest and Unhappiest People Live in the US

This Map Shows Where the Happiest and Unhappiest People Live in the US | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
All other things being equal, the south, parts of the west, and upper midwest are the happiest places in the United States according to a recent study.
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Esri & Google in a Post Google Earth Enterprise World

Esri & Google in a Post Google Earth Enterprise World | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
“Google and Esri are working closely together to provide replacement software and training to all of Google’s enterprise customers and partners that have implemented Google Earth Enterprise and Google Maps Engine technology. Esri will be providing the new 10.3 version of ArcGIS for Server and related client/app technology to all Google Earth Enterprise and Google …
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JAXA | World Elevation Data (30-meter mesh version) is now available at JAXA's site free of charge!

JAXA | World Elevation Data (30-meter mesh version) is now available at JAXA's site free of charge! | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
Get information on the World Elevation Data (30-meter mesh version) is now available at JAXA's site free of charge!. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) performs various activities related to aerospace as an organization, from basic research in the aerospace field to development and utilization.
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Getting to know Esri Maps for Office 3.0: Part 1 | ArcGIS Blog

Getting to know Esri Maps for Office 3.0: Part 1 | ArcGIS Blog | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
Esri Maps for Office 3.0 is the biggest update to the add-in since it launched nearly 3 years ago. From an updated visual design to improved workflows and under-the-hood improvements, there is a lot to take in. In part 1 of this blog series, I will talk about the new ability to add multiple map windows, the new location of your map tools, and the search tool. In part 2, coming next week, I’ll talk about the beautiful new add data workflow, expanded coordinate system support, and the new capability to use linear feature services with custom location types.
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Critical Space Time Pattern Mining Patch | Support Services Blog

This patch has been released to repair logic functionality of the Space Time Pattern Mining tool used In the Spatial Statistics toolbox in ArcGIS for Desktop.
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Journey to the Centre of the Earth

Journey to the Centre of the Earth | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
How far would you have to travel to reach the Earth's core? And what would you see along the way? Discover what lies beneath...
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Story Map Journal - Mountains of Fire

Story Map Journal - Mountains of Fire | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it

Mountains
of Fire
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 
Touring the world's deadliest and most active volcanoes
 
 
 
They're strung across the breadth of the Earth like glowing necklaces. They cluster densely along geologic boundaries where tectonic plates collide. They threaten millions of people who live within their shadows. They may lie dormant for centuries and then, overnight, spew cubic miles of molten rock and ash.
 
Scroll down to peer into the planet's most dangerous mountains.
 
 
Left: Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull erupts at dusk on March 27, 2010.
 
 
 
Mapping
the Ring of Fire
 
 
Hundreds of volcanoes fringe the vast Pacific Ocean in a Ring of Fire. Most of these volcanoes are the result of the collision of tectonic plates. As oceanic crust slips beneath other oceanic plates or thicker but lighter continental plates, water is released and moves upward, causing melting of surrounding rock. The resulting magma pushes upward and ultimately breaks through the crust, spawining volcanoes.
 
Millions of people, from the Philippines to Japan, from the Pacific Northwest to the Andes of South America, live with the double threat of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes, the latter triggered as subducting crust moves in fits and starts beneath continental edges and island arcs.
 
In the middle of the Pacific, a hotspot--a plume of magma rising from deep within Earth's mantle--has created the Hawaiian Islands. As the Pacific Plate has crept northward and westward, the stationary hotspot has left behind a chain of mountains hundreds of miles long.
 
Pan, zoom, and click on the map to explore volcanoes and plate boundaries.
 
CHILE:
Villarica

 
 
In the wee hours of Tuesday morning, March 3, 2015, Villarica, a highly active volcano located 400 miles south of Santiago, Chile's capital, came to life in a spectacular eruption. More than 3,000 people were evacuated from the area.
 
 
ITALY:
Mount Vesuvius
 

 
Italy's storied Vesuvius looms over Naples, posing a direct threat to more than a half-million people. The mountain has erupted many times in recorded history. A 1631 event killed 3,000 people. The most famous eruption was in 79 A.D. when pyroclastic flows obliterated Pompeii and Herculaneum. Pliny the Younger, in an eyewitness account of the eruption, wrote that "a fearful black cloud was rent by forked and quivering bursts of flame, and parted to reveal great tongues of fire, like flashes of lightning magnified in size."
 
The mountain's last major eruption was in 1944, as reported in the newsreel above.
 
 
WASHINGTON:
Mount St. Helens
 

United States Geological Survey
 
On Sunday, May 18, 1980, the north slope of Mount St. Helens in southern Washington state collapsed in a gigantic landslide. The slope had bulged and weakened over the previous several weeks as magma pushed toward the surface beneath it. The landslide triggered an explosive eruption that killed 57 people and sent a column of smoke and ash 80,000 feet into the air. Thousands of acres of forest were flattened.
 
St. Helens has become a laboratory for vulcanologists and ecologists; the latter are observing the return of forest to the volcano's slopes and surrounding area. The NASA satellite images also document the re-greening of the landscape. Click on the dates below:
 
June 17, 1984
August, 21, 1996
August 20, 2013
 
For many years following the eruption, thousands of logs clogged the surface of Spirit Lake (below), a few miles north of the mountain.
 

Photo by Stephan Schultz
 
 
 
ALASKA:
Mount Katmai
 

United States Geological Survey. Information about the map
The June 1912 Katmai eruption was the largest on the entire planet during the twentieth century. The actual site of the eruption was several miles west of the crater lake in the image (foreground in scene at left and tan area in the geologic map above); however, the eruption caused the collapse of Mount Katmai, forming a crater which later partially filled with water. About 28 cubic kilometers of material was ejected in the eruption.
 

Katmai is part of a cluster of volcanoes that includes this crater. Photo: National Park Service
 
 
ITALY:
Stromboli
 

 
Stromboli, a highly active volcano that dominates an island north of Sicily, has a penchant for hurling boulders--volcanic bombs--into the air. This violent, "strombolean" form of eruption has been observed on many other volcanoes worldwide. The island of Stromboli is inhabited (pan toward the northeast and southwest on the image at left), but most of the mountain's wrath is aimed seaward and toward the northwest.
 
INDONESIA:
Krakatoa

Lithograph by Parker & Coward, UK
The cluster of small islands in the foreground at left are the remnants of the mountain that was obliterated in the famous 1883 eruption of Krakatoa. The eruption spawned tsunamis that killed some 38,000 people.
 
 
ICELAND:
Eyjafjallajökull
 
 

 
This Icelandic volcano is as difficult in its behavior as its name is to pronounce (click here for an audio sample). Its last major eruption, in the spring of 2010, created an ash cloud that closed many airports in Europe, forcing the cancellation of thousands of flights.
 
 
 
UNITED STATES:
Yellowstone Caldera
 

Photo by Greg Willis
Yellowstone National Park sits atop a giant caldera, the thermal energy of which powers Old Faithful (above) and many other geysers. The caldera in turn is the surface expression of a hotspot that has left a path of lava fields across the western United States as the North American plate has moved over it.
 
The last major eruption of the Yellowstone Caldera occurred about 640,000 years ago—a blink of the eye in geologic time. The eruption ejected about 1,000 cubic kilometers of material; thus a repeat of this sort of event would be a very big deal.
 
 
UNITED STATES:
Mauna Loa and Kilauea

United States Geological Survey
 
Mauna Loa (foreground in view on left) is the largest of five volcanoes on Hawaii's Big Island. Together these volcanoes are the largest on Earth; in fact, measured from their seafloor base to their summit they comprise the largest mountain on the planet.
 
Both Kilauea and its neighbor to the east, Mauna Loa, are highly active. But their lava is low in silica, resulting in eruptions that, although sometimes spectacular, are for the most part non-explosive. Below is an exception: lava from Kilauea explodes as it meets the waters of the Pacific.

Photo by United States Geological Survey
 
REUNION ISLAND:
Piton de la Fournaise
 

 
"Peak of the Furnace" is the English version of the name of one of Earth's most active volcanoes. It, like Hawaii's volcanoes is of the shield type, with broad, gradual slopes and eruptions that, for the most part, are not explosive.
 
 
ANTARCTICA:
Mount Erebus
 
 

Topographic map of Ross Island by the U.S. Geological Survey
Mount Erebus looms over Ross Island, just off the icy coast of Antarctica. It is the southernmost active volcano in the world. Despite its remote location, it is thoroughly studied due to its high degree of activity and its proximity to two Antarctic research stations.
 
 
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO:
Mount Nyiragongo
 

 
Nyiragongo is well-known among volcano experts for its frequently occurring, cauldron-like lava lake which can span as much as two kilometers.
 
The mountain is one of a long string of volcanic formations associated with the Albertine Rift, caused by the slow separation of the Somali Plate from the African Plate.
 
 
SOLOMON ISLANDS:
Mount Tinakula
 
 

 
 
Commemorated on a stamp, Tinakula erupts almost hourly. It has killed or chased off its island's human population at least twice, in 1951 and in 1971. 
 
 
Time-Lapse Videos of
The World's Most Active Volcanoes
 
 
Without several thousand years of observation it's impossible to definitively rank the world's most active volcanoes. But this video hints at the power and peril of volcanic eruptions.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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South America & Western Europe SRTM 30 m in Esri World Elevation Services | ArcGIS Blog

South America & Western Europe SRTM 30 m in Esri World Elevation Services | ArcGIS Blog | Geospatial Pro - GIS | Scoop.it
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