#georic
Follow
Find
97 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:46 PM

I watched this short commercial with my geography class. While watching, you could almost forget that it was only a commercial. The commercial brings up that the internet can be a great tool in finding information. It also shows that the internet breaks down boundaries that had been impossible to get over physically.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 3:59 AM

These ads reflect the changing culture of India. There is a more progressive culture taking hold which is quite possibly caused by the effects of globalization. Along with India's industrialization, technology is a factor in the culture change. Taboo topics, like remarriage and the partition with Pakistan, are being used by advertisers be provocative without being offensive to most people.

 

The culture of India will undoubtedly be affected by its media representing more progressive ideas as well. Repeated exposure to these ideas will create new generations of Indians more comfortable with remarriage, much like newer generations in the United States are more comfortable with gay marriage.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:21 PM

Commercials work even when they don't. When its an annoying commercial, everyone still remembers exactly what the commercial is for. What Google does here is brilliant. This is very powerful and the reunited states could be an idea to get used to.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

So you want to form your own state? It may take a while

So you want to form your own state? It may take a while | #georic | Scoop.it

Voters in five Colorado counties said on Tuesday they want to form their own state.  But the breakaway regions face almost impossible constitutional and political obstacles. The North Colorado movement supporters claim that their counties have little in common with more urbanized parts of the state, and they are unhappy with state-wide laws about gun control and energy standards. 


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

movements to secceed and create their own state is a popular idea but will not be easy because of the political and cultural implications. Already exisiting states would become smaller and turn into smaller autonmous states. in the long run it may be more to manage because we would not more representatives and senators to represent this additional state. THe independant states may have more states but could become a headache for the 50 original states we already have.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 14, 2013 12:06 PM

There are other secessionist movements, and other ways the states might have formed, but these are all very unlikely.  There's that little document called the Constitution that makes these movements impractical.  

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 10:27 AM

Theres an old saying that fits well with this article and its "if its not broke dont fix it" theres no major problem with having some demographicial differences in a state. Sure Nor Cal and So Cal may be nothing alike but that doesnt mean they need to officially seperate. Thanks to the constitution the seperation of a state/ forming of a state isnt a easy proccess, because if it was there would be endless amounts of states in this country because no 2 people share the exact same opinion.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 10, 3:18 PM

This article was very insightful and thought provoking. The idea of having 51 states in our country does not frequent in conversations,however it is surprising that it is not a more popularized idea. In our country there are many states that for lack of better termonolgy are too "big". States like California,Texas and Alaska are three that come to mind. In the idea of government and governing it seems somewhat impossible to keep a large mass of citizens organized. I can see in some cirrcumstances where citizens  would want to have more direct connection with their government instead of being generalized with individuals from the same state but different environments.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult | #georic | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

The phillipines is made up of many islands, it is difficult to bring aid quickly and promptly. Disease may be an issue for the still unreached. Aid has come from all over world. and it was also stated that China was a bit stingy in it contribution to the disaster. Again this an important opportunity to increase effecient strategies in dealing with natural disasters and working together with the world at large in improving the speed and manner in which aid is distributed.

more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 30, 2013 10:59 PM

This is a devastating time for the people of the Philippines. All they have to worry about is staying alive and being close to there family members. Help is on the way. Everyone in the world should pitch in and try to help them in anyway they can. But what I would like to find out is why this has happen when it has not before in this country. This country I have not seen in the news before this big devastation had happened. I am also curious to find out how come the help aid is taking so long to arrive when people are dying because they have no food available for them because it has been destroyed or it is trapped under all the debris from all the buildings that have collapsed because they were not structured properly. this situation is a repeat of hurricane Katrina in the united states were all the house were not hurricane proof and were built in places known for disaster.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 10:37 PM

Due to the fact the Philippines is made up of over 7,000 islands, it makes aid response very difficult. When natural disasters such as typhoons occur in the Philippines it can negatively affect hundreds of islands, making it difficult to help the people on every island. It can takes days for supplies to arrive on some of the islands, and sometimes people do not even receive necessary supplies such as food and water. Countries, which are composed of numerous islands, face many challenges.  

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:09 PM

Fortunately, the Philippines has a relatively stable infrastructure so even though lots of areas were hit, the human fatalities and issues are not as bad as they could have been. Unfortunately, these are many islands and getting from one to the next is very difficult when all communications and landing areas are compromised.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan

'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan | #georic | Scoop.it

The news from the Philippines, where it's feared that last week’s powerful Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 10,000 people, isn’t getting better as hundreds of thousands of people struggle to survive and authorities struggle to get help to them.

 

"Its absolute bedlam right now," says Richard Gordon, head of the Philippine Red Cross.  “There's an awful lot of casualties, a lot of people dead all over the place, a lot of destruction.”

 

According to the BBC, a huge international relief effort is underway, but rescue workers have struggled to reach some towns and villages cut off since the storm.

 

Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, Philippines.


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

people have  not slept normally for days. There hasnt been one person who hasnt lost someone in the devastation. THe government of the Phillipines is doing all they can for help. one woman is asking for international help to come not tomorrow but as soon as they possibly can. It is absolute chaos. There are villages that have been cut off from public assistance, and the international community is pulling together now to help bring relief. People are with signs asking the world for help.

more...
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 8:50 AM

Even though the death toll resulting from Typhoon Haiyan is around 1,000, it is expected to reach 10,000.  International aid will hopefully help cities such as Tacloban City recover from this storm.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:16 PM

This is insane. It has affected millions of people and and even killed people. Its good that so many people are going to help though.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:05 PM

With so many of the citizens living on the coast, a large typhoon like this completely destroys most of the country. When this much devastation happens all at one time it takes a very long time to recover.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines

How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines | #georic | Scoop.it
Volunteers across the world are building the digital infrastructure for the organization's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

online maps are being used to help locate the best way possible to help transport food and resources to those most in need. They van locate bridges and the world is pulling together with tehcnolgy and accurate maps to help the  American red Cross maximize in time and manpower. It seems that after Hurricane Katrina and the Earthquakes in Haiti and Japan, We have been improving our strategies for how to best help people around the globe come together put our time energy and resources together to best help people whose lives have been devasted and crushed by the forces of mother nature.

 

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:28 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  Can you join in and help?


Tags: disasters, mappingPhilippines, STEM.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:14 PM

Having a map of the current landscape, after the typhoon will speed up relief and rescue efforts by showing areas to land and set up help stations. The digital world is immediate now and this will change how organizations such as the Red Cross provide relief to suffering people.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Create Your Own Map

Create Your Own Map | #georic | Scoop.it

"Create a color-coded Visited States Map, showing off your road travel in the United States and Canada."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

create your own map is interesing because it allows you to visualize and share with others your own journey around the country in terms of residence and visits being in seperate colors. Compared to the size of the country I myself have only been to very few states. I have yet to go to Alaska, Hawaii, the Midwest parts, and much of the Western part of the country. I am convinced that extensive travel is something i will accomplish in the yeard ahead. For the professor himself he still has several more states to visit. It is propbable that he will visit many more in the years to come

more...
Ken Peterson's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:18 PM

This is pretty flexible in that you can use 4 different colors to shade individual states.

Charles Adami's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:52 PM

Students color code states involved in expedition. Louisiana Purchase , and US circa 1803.

Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 12:40 PM

I took the liberty of using this site which was linked on my Professor's page to create my own map of travels within the United States! Green represents states which I've spent many nights, amber for states which I briefly passed through, and red for states I've never been to at all. I didn't include the map for Canada as well, but I've been to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Ontario primarily. I'm very into the idea of travel and intend to visit as many places as I can in my lifetime, but I have focused much of my journeys for the future into foreign countries. This map gave me the hint that I might want to focus homeward a bit more.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

more...
harish magan's comment, November 6, 2013 1:02 PM
Great Source for studies.
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

Mrs. K's curator insight, August 27, 6:41 AM

2G Contemporary Period

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Geography Lesson: Just How Big is Africa? | Big Picture Agriculture

Geography Lesson: Just How Big is Africa? | Big Picture Agriculture | #georic | Scoop.it

This map of Africa was created by Kal Krause, who calls it a small contribution in the fight against rampant immappancy, a word meaning insufficient geographical knowledge.

 

For comparison, the U.S. including Alaska, has a land size that is only 32 percent of the size of Africa.

 

Next, let’s look at a map showing renewable water per capita in Africa. As you can see, water security in Africa varies greatly by country, but on average is scarce.

 

Click headline to read more and view maps full screen--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Tony Aguilar's insight:

no one ever takes thought that most European nations including USA big parts of China India and the UK fit inside the African continent in terms of size. UK being the size of Madagascar off the coast of Mozambique in East Africa. This means that most people do not have this common sense of map countries proportion and size relativiley compared to other countries. Because of the massiveness of Africa they also have disproportionate water shortages per per person. i think more must be done to provide clean water supply, and help Africa become a developed nation across the Board

more...
Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, November 5, 2013 1:02 AM

Here is a great lesson with a map!

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages

(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages | #georic | Scoop.it

"What language is spoken in Croatia? Croatian is now the 24th official language of the European Union, but there are disagreements about whether it’s a distinct language or just a slightly different dialect of Serbian. Serbian nationalists believe that everyone shares the same language, “Serbian”. But many Croats persist in making their national language as distinct from Serbian as possible. Listeners will discover how politics is intruding on language, and how it is changing the map of linguistic patterns in unexpected ways."

 

Tags: language, Croatia, political, podcast, Maps 101.


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

These countries share issues that stem from cultural dialects that come from the standard Serbian language spoken in that region. These growing language differences can cause poltical geographical changes that interfere with Serbian solidarity. The croatians feel that they speak a different language while all serbians claim that it is one language. These differences may cause a wider seperation among the peoples politically changing language patterns in these regions where ancient Macedonia and Greek cutures once pervaded. They have experienced national divisons in the past, these language differences may cause their identity in the EU to shift to have no cultural relation to their immediately surrounding Serbian countries.

more...
CCRES's comment, November 6, 2013 4:06 AM
Baška tablet , Croatian: Bašćanska ploča, pronounced is one of the first monuments containing an inscription in the Croatian recension of the Church Slavonic language, dating from the year 1100.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 3:03 PM

This part of the world has been so mixed up for so long. Each country wants their own identity, language and name but the borders are continually changing. Although these fights seem petty to me (an American) I am sure they mean quite a bit to the people living in these areas. National identity is very important to humans in general. Where we come from is the basis of who we are.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:51 AM

Languages are sometimes a mystery to countries but mostly has to do with who's occupying these countries and where the countries are located.  Croatia is only a few countries away from Serbia so the fact that the language they speak may/not be close to Serbian is no surprise. Migration and other factors contribute to the language developed in specific countries.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geographically Yours

Geographically Yours | #georic | Scoop.it

"If an urban population demands the freshest vegetables, they should be produced within a 24-hour field-to-table delivery zone.  What, therefore, should be the highest and best use of agricultural land between Taiwan's two largest cities, Taipei and Kaoshiung, only 200 miles apart?  The Lord of the Rings, a.k.a., Johan Heinrich Von Thünen, has the answer."  [2011]


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This image communicates the importance of agriculture and marketplace relativity. in an area where transportation is minimal and people happen to be more more poorer then need to supply needed resources in a timely manner is very important. Farmers and resource providers need to be close enough geographically. This image shows an outside clothing and food market were people get to shop around and choose in a convientent ways there most needed items. The umbrella suggests rain as the child and other shoppers are being covered. This outdoor market doesnt necessarily suggest poverty but a wide range of population given a convenient location to buy goods quikcly and efficiently. The market may be located in a urban downtown area or also a village central area. Regardless the location, and goods provided shows the valuable commodities need to be provided in a manner, freshest possible for delivery.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 5, 2013 4:02 PM

This image and analysis comes from the blog "Geographically Yours" by Don Zeigler.  He's a well-traveled cultural geographer and has been collecting great teaching images over his career and is now sharing them on this site.  These pictures are great discussion starters and bell ringers to start the day.


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, APHG, images.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, November 13, 2013 8:40 AM

It is said that locally grown food can have more nutritional value than organic if the latter comes from thousands of miles away. If you had to choose, which would you rather have, locally grown or organic? 

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography and Literacy Connection

The Geography and Literacy Connection | #georic | Scoop.it

"What do you think of when you hear the word literacy? Depending on what you teach, chances are geography is not the first thought that comes to mind. But believe it or not, geography and literacy naturally share many similarities. And you can deepen students’ learning in both geography and literacy when they are integrated in the curriculum."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

The geography and literacy connection helps new generation student apply common core to better be prepared in the 21st century for vocation and keen awareness of geopgraphy, history and the world around them. Common core allows them to apply critical thinking and connections to the wolrd around them including a thurough understanding of geopgraphy. History and geography are being integrated to apply a different way of preparing students and creating a better awareness of changes in our world. literacy will not only be focused on reading but studying and analyzing data and statistics that help them become better integrated in the world around them.

more...
TechMarm's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:01 PM

Literacy opportunities exist in every nook and cranny of the curriculum.

Ana Melo's curator insight, November 4, 2013 9:41 AM

Geography provides a lot of fundamental knowledge and gives you also a sense of place, which I find very relevant in times of globalization where you belong everywhere and nowhere simultaneously.

Chris Cividino's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:06 AM

Understanding key terminology in geography is paramount to demonstrating deep knowledge of geographical concepts.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement | #georic | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

These rural colorado area feel that being overheard or misrepresented by their local government would lead them to seceed and create their own state. This may be a good idea only in making sure they are being heard as an autonomous state it will only be a potentially bad thing if they attempt to be their own country. urbna centralized governments may overlook farmers anf other people who have needs that dont coincide to well with government whose agenda is focused on urbanizing and expanding in a non agricultural way. It is aparent though that there are leaders who do  want a seccession and want to see the rural areas come together and feel that they are being more better represented.

more...
Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:25 PM

On election day this year, several Colorado counties voted on whether to secede from Colorado and create a new state. Many of the counties voted in favor of the idea. (See the link below for more info on the Colorado secession movement.) This is not the first time groups of Americans have considered (and voted on) breaking away from their state. When political issues come up and decisions are made by the government and/or the people, some get their way and others do not. The article explains one way that some people have decided to take action when they do not feel their interests are being served.

 

BONUS for my students:

1) What steps do you think should be taken before people consider seceding from their state?  

2) What are some possible pros and cons of breaking away from a state to create a new one?  

3) Hypothetically speaking, what would it take for you to want to create a new state?

 

Here is the link to the article about Colorado's secession movement:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/colorado-rural-voters-approve-secession-idea-20850962

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:43 PM

Some states urban and rural areas have had differences and beliefs when it comes to politics. For example Virginia and West Virginia have had their differences and this is what has caused them to seperate. If every state did this there would be too much craziness because im sure each state would have a different belief and nobody would agree on anything. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 7:57 PM

This article is about segments of California, Colorado, and Oregon wanting to separate and become their own states so their voices can be heard in Congress.

 

If, hypothetically, new states were formed out of existing ones this kind of gerrymandering would likely only lead to even more new states. It might even lead to a secession arms race to gain more Democrat and Republican seats in the Senate. With so many new states, it could lead to increased division, with no Democrat or Republican wanting to set foot in an opposition’s state. In the long run though, political affiliations do eventually change and we would have a precedent analogous to attempting to take the ball home when the other kids don't want to play the same game as you, which is not how a democratic republic works.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | #georic | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

The author of thid article shares how his father moved to the farm in search for economic prosperity and opportunity. Then as a soon he desires one day to make his fathers farm into a place were organic food would be sold one day. Due to land projects and government needing the land his fathers orginal agricultural enterprise in the Minnesota region shifted. I was very suprised after reading this article that the best way to have economic and environmental sustainability is to work with with the markets and develop genetically modified foods as the most viable way to create a surplus in a highly urbanized growing landscape. I found it very saf fake food is prefered over real food that ws once made though the old school agricultural process of sowing reaping and harvesting natural foods to be placed in the market and provided to people.

more...
Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 27, 11:24 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

HDI Map

HDI Map | #georic | Scoop.it

"Our mission is to provide easy-to-use, yet methodologically sound tools for understanding well being and opportunity in America and to simulate fact-based dialogue about issues we all care about: health, education and income. "


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This article allows us to see development in our country. There is abviously less very developed areas and more lower develops on a macro level in this country. This map provides a better understanding for what the looks like in areas of the US we are familiar with. It also helps us to glean strategies of how to spatially implement the development of more lands. This focuses on how evenly spread healthm education, and income is throughout the country. The oeverall question is how do we improve development as a whole throughout the whole country.

more...
Mrs. B's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:08 AM

Love how this dissaggregates the data to individual states. What are the states with the highest HDI and why?

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, November 23, 2013 5:00 PM

A wonderful tool to explore and play around with demography, income, etc. across the U.S.  It would be great if you could dial in on only coastal counties to compare coastal vs. inland regions of the U.S.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 3, 10:32 PM

HDI...Chapter 9 material HUGGERS!

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

Geography in the News: Bluefin Tuna Decline

Geography in the News: Bluefin Tuna Decline | #georic | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Bluefin Tuna in Decline The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), an international agreement between governments, dealt a serious blow to the Atlantic...

Via Thomas Faltin
Tony Aguilar's insight:

It is quite interesting that a very popular blue fin tuna species is running the risk of endangerment because of overfishing there has been a proposed ban. If the decline continues as it has been this fish can possibly be extinct in a decade. The tuna ban is mad for markets who make a lot of money on the tuna, but for animal conservationists that are looking for opportunities for legislation to help save the blue fin species.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | #georic | Scoop.it

Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial components to it.  My wife and I prepared an article for the Geography News Network on Maps101.com that shows the historical and geographic context of the first Thanksgiving and in the memorialization of Thanksgiving as a national holiday (if you don’t subscribe to Maps 101, it is also freely available as a podcast on Stitcher Radio or iTunes).


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This website is interesting because it gives us the geography of where specific foods in the country are manufactured such as cranberrie sauce, turkeys, sweet potatoes and helps us develop a rich cultural history and earn solidarity of where we come from and the traditions that make us who we are in terms of culinary choices. The original thanksgiving with the early puritan settlers in New England most likely reflected dishes that were synonomous with foods that natives grew and other local items that were family in this area. Now because of industry we to choose foods that have their origin from markets nationwide.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 16, 2013 7:52 PM

One of my favorite combinations of maps for Thanksgiving involves the geography of food production and food consumption.  When we start looking at the regional dishes on Thanksgiving plates we can see some great patterns.  This ESRI storymap asks the simple question, where did your Thanksgiving Dinner come From?

 

This StoryMap is a great resource to combine with this New York Times article that shows the regional preferences for the most popular Thanksgiving recipes.  Where are sweet potatoes grown?  Where do people make sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving? 

Plymouth County, MA is heart of only 3 cranberry producing regions and is was also home to the first Thanksgiving.  How has this New England local ecology and traditional food patterns influenced national traditions? 

For these and more Thanksgiving resources on scoop.it, click here.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 17, 2013 12:35 PM

Love to see where the traditional American Thanksgiving food comes from.  We have that, but growing up in an all Italian household Thanksgivng was more then Turkey...it had an added Italian flavor.  Start with antipasto that had a prosciutto that would met in your mouth, plus cheeses, muhrooms, other meats, then would come the soup, then the pasta, could be any variety then the Turkey, but you would also have a ham because you never knew who was going to stop by, plus all the trimmings and then finally dessert with Italian cookies and pastires along with the Thanksgivng traditions of pumpkin and apple pies.  We took breaks inbetween courses to watch some football and make room for more food becasue it was all good.  We literally ate all day.  So for us out food came form all over the world.  In a nation of immigrants, we added our own flavor to an American Holiday..and to me whats more American than brining in some of your own hertitage into a holiday..we are after all a "melting pot"

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | #georic | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

The before and after effects that are posted on this page is astonishing. The forces of mother nature are responsible for millions of dollars worth of damage througout many mainland and coastal areas of the phillipines. Very similiar to the results that occured with the tsunami that happened in japan. Thousands of lives lost, and it will take about a couple of years for this country to really come back strong and rebuild after surving these difficult times

 

more...
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:35 PM
Looking upfront at the before and after the typhoon hit the Philipines right on the coast line. The coast was completly wiped out and destructed it looked as though nothing was ever there. Not only were homes and businesses destructed but over 2500 people were killed in this natural disaster.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 10:50 PM

By viewing the before and after images, one can see how destructive this typhoon was. Almost every building was absolutely destroyed and the damage looks overwhelming. Disaster's such as this can really set a country back, as the damage appears to be costly. Although sad to look at, these images were informational. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Indian Independence and the Question of Partition

The partition of 1947, which led to the creation of India and Pakistan, was one of the most volatile events of the twentieth century. Partition coincided with the end of British colonial rule over the subcontinent, and Indian independence was overshadowed by violence, mass displacement, and uncertainty.

The scholars in this video were interviewed for the Choices Program curriculum, "Indian Independence and the Question of Partition". For more information, visit the Choices Program.


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This issue was partition was very disheartening for the movement involving passive resistance. They paid a great price to remove Brittish rule but unfortuntaley could not keep the nation together under a united Hinduism and Muslim rule. Ghandi specifically was very sad. They insisted that the Hindus would enslave the muslims so they needed two seperate states india and Pakistan. The nation of Bangledesh. is also descendant of India people as well,1947 set the tone for what happened in the US CIvil rights movement with Dr. King. Before the partiton agreement with Britian, they were able to demonstrate that social change could be achieved in this revolutionary way.

more...
steve smith's curator insight, November 13, 2013 4:38 PM

Great for Level One Geography - population studies

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:44 PM

Cant watch this because of privacy settings?

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | #georic | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This map shows the strongest human slavery areas in the world. The map shows stronlgy in India, Asia, and Africa. This may contribute to religious poltical,  cutural differences where one group dominates an ethnically or culturally inferior group. To some societies slavery is just like normal life, and others such as Sudan were countries that had Islamic to Christian oppression as slaves. it is happening all around the world with small children and sex trafficking where they are completely at the whim of the heads of those organizations. Our consumer dollars may also be used to support some of these henious slavery groups without even knowing. A Global movement to effect cultural, ethnic, and antislavery change should be initiated to help reduce the horribel atrocities of slavery in countries with their many forms.

more...
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:36 AM

For slavery to thrive you need a big business to produce goods for and a large amount of people to actually do the work for little or no pay. We can try to eliminate by having machines produce goods or paying the workers more and giving them better working conditions. Our spending habits are some what responsible because these slaves our producing our products for us for very cheap. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:15 AM

In my opinion slavery is the worst possible living situation. id rather be be free but have no food suply than to be a slave. its dishearting to look at these numbers and see that 30 million people have to deal with the worst quality of live possible. but what sickens me the most is the lack of information we have been given about this though primary schools. In school we were taught about Lincoln freeing the slaves ans american slavery almost every year. But not a single time did they connect or even touch on that it is a massive problem in the world today. It was to the extend that for a few years i was mislead to thinking that Lincoln made this a slave free world, boy was i wrong. Slavery is revesable though, it can be countered by harser punishments and more restrictions on the slave owners. We could also do our best to make it so they bring in as little money as possible so they are forced to find a different occupation. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 5:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Many Countries Are There?


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

What makes a country a country is if they play by the rules, of other soverin nations on a global scale and follow the rules. Most countries recieve taxes from their citizens, have a military and a recognized as a soverin. Not every body of land is a country but are also properties controlled by other countries. There are countries in the South Pacific. In North, South America, Europe, and Asia, and bevcause of politcal geopgrahpy nations sizes are changing often and new countries are usually created from theis process

 

more...
Susan Schuler Blake's curator insight, November 3, 2013 7:24 PM

Fast English, humorous, inconclusive, great!

Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:12 PM

This is one of those frequently asked questions in Geography class that sometimes results in increased confusion. The maker of this video has summed it up nicely.

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 9:44 AM

193....except........

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | #georic | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This article is interesting because it talks about a poorer countries best commodities and its difficulty with making money off of it in the market because of the rise in prices. Quinoa is very popular and may create massive poularity and wealth for producers in the country on a global level but have recently have had to deal with issues of high prices in the market. Bolivia has many poor people and have also searched for government subsidies so that people can afford to but them. This article is a prime example of how indeginous people have a difficult time maximizing earning from powerful natural resources while other global companies or players in the game could make most of the money off of their industry such as areas in East Africa were diamond mines exist, and chocolate markets but the countries themselves profit very little because Big business is in control of the major profits worldwide.

more...
Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 27, 11:23 AM

Its crazy how something grown so far away can become such a dominant aspect in the food consupmtion of people in such distant place.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2:01 PM

Quinoa is the new food to lose weight with. People all over the world have discovered its health benefits and can't get enough of it. However, quinoa only grows in certain climates and places. Since its supply is in high demand, finding places for it to grow would be beneficial to those trying to market and sell the grain. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 6:55 PM

Quinoa has been a staple crop in the Andes mountains for many years. It has only been recently that people in other parts of the world have recognized its health benefits. Since it is grown in only a tiny part of the world, the supply may easily fall behind the demand. Finding a similar geographic area to grow crops in may be what is needed in order to increase the supply.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | #georic | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

An interactive map that allows to glean important material and information on a global map. It is noticed that in proportion to the rest of the world Antartica is massive. The interactive map give you tools for individual countries political, social, economic geograpghy and may help a student glean a deeper understanding of the world around him. The map is also used to pinpont zoom in and identify key places, can be used in a classroom and for students young and old who are seriously enquiring of understanding the world around them in a more understandable manner.

more...
Matt Davidson's curator insight, August 27, 8:45 PM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2:44 PM

This is the key to finding specific articles.

Helen Rowling's curator insight, September 28, 6:30 PM

Use updates to filter through and be collated in your most frequented tools.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Maldives

Maldives | #georic | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

The interesting thing about Maldives is its location on manly islands along the indian ocean and the nation of india. it is an islamic country with many islands like Indonesia and is Islamic in is government. it has very beautiful parts similir to Bora Bora and Fiji, wonderful place for toueism but its inhabitants are kept away from the tourists because differences in religion and culture but they do want to make money off the people that vacation there. It looks like a strange set of islands because they haver also been affected by tsunamis and are a great fishing economy. It seems like a wonderful place to visit for vacation. In the past leaders have been pressured to step down like other Muslim countries. They have many poor inhabitants but have high hopes for having a future with tourism vacation and fishing exports.

more...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 4:19 AM

The Maldives are an extremely interesting case of physical geography. They are made of coral and sands which the oceans have deposited on the coral skeleton of the islands. The ringed shape of the islands suggests there was once something in the center of the them which either receded into the ocean or eroded away leaving only the hardened coral rings behind.

 

Economically, the fairly unique nature of these tropical islands makes them an excellent tourist destination and Maldives has a significant tourist industry. Unfortunately, the unique physical geography of the islands makes them extremely vulnerable to tsunami and rising sea levels. If global warming raises the ocean levels a few feet, the majority of the islands will be flooded permanently.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 6:51 PM

Although they are a country that relies on tourism for their economy, they still limit the number of tourists in respect for the Muslim population of the islands. Unfortunately, geology of the islands puts them in danger of rising sea levels without much of a solution for protection.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:48 PM

Boy would I love to visit the Maldives. What an interesting and beautiful island it is.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Youth TechCamps

Youth TechCamps | #georic | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This is an amazing opportunity for high school students to network build relationships and glean knowledsge and learn ways to plug into their community and their world around them. This allows students to learn more about geographic technolgies to understand mapping and climate changes and would be an amazing opportuinty for students to find their vocation and find ways to plug into people who work in their communities and it seems though that the school is only available in Bolivia Panama and South Africa. We need more students that are more aware geograhically and able to meet the needs in a changing global climate.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2013 10:20 PM

The AAG has requested that I share this with geography educators and I'm delighted to do so because this is fantastic program; please encourage students to apply for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.  "This program aims to provide opportunities for youth to learn more about online geospatial technologies and how to apply them in service to their communities, while gaining a deeper understanding about different places and cultures of the world.  It is conducted by the Association of American Geographers (AAG) with funding and support from the US Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Youth Programs Division. The MyCOE partnership has actively led more than ten years of youth leadership programs, finding solutions to sustainable development challenges in local communities using geographic concepts and tools, while connecting with each other globally." 

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Assessing Online Sources

Assessing Online Sources | #georic | Scoop.it

Tweet from Earth Pics (screenshot preserved for when it gets taken down).  Retweeted over 1,000 times in the first hour.


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

students need to be very careful in the type of sources that they used to glean information. People can manipulate photos and suggest things as fact when they are completetly made up. It is understandable that Wikipedia can not be used as an entireyl reliable source because people have access to add whatever they want to the content matter. Photoshop and other online tools can be used to trick people into beleiving certain things. This photo claiming to be from ireland is really from Thailand is a small island but the castle itself on the top os photoshoped and the image was retweeded like crazy within the first hor. wee must check our sources and make sure that we are getting good primary or at least good secondary services from legit websites.

more...
Tracy Kovach's curator insight, October 26, 2013 1:04 PM

Great internet literacy activity

Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 6:10 PM

Real or not"  Ireland or Tahiland?  Photoshopped or not? - check the length and shape of the shadow!. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 5:08 PM

This just shows that you can't believe everything you see on the internet. In this picture it is said to be of an island in Ireland but in reality it is in Thailand. People believe what they want to believe.