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Urban Exploration

Urban Exploration | #georic | Scoop.it

"The French have a wonderful word—flâneur—for someone who seeks to explore and understand the nature of a city’s landscape, usually by taking spontaneous adventures amidst the ebb and flow of life going on around them. In this week’s theme we invite you to lose yourself reading about the flâneur-esque adventures of Maptia’s streetwise connoisseurs and explore a myriad of cities through their eyes."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This article demonstrates that there are so many places around the world yet to visit and it is important to plan and save as soon as possible becuase seeing all the beautiful cities of the world ma ytake several years, so preperation in is a must, From Cities in Asia, to Paris, London, Russia and Turkey you will be able to travel on festive dates and examine the landscapes that define these beautiful metropolises. From Cathedrals, to Big Ben, and Haggia Sophia in Instanbul, one will be marveled by the multicutural beauty and night life that exists around the world

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, December 1, 2013 11:04 AM

A wonderful site that currently explores 21 global cities.  If you've ever traveled to India (any major city within it), Mexico City, Rome, or any another travel destination where the human street population is somewhat off the charts, you'll enjoy these blog posts.  Meanwhile, I am thinking about entering a post of my own!  This is a perfect site to share with students prior to journal writing or school trips abroad. 

Helen Rowling's curator insight, December 1, 2013 8:18 PM

Gr8 immersion of stories of lives in other countries.

Tony Gough's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:09 AM

Travel the world and read the short stories to learn more!

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This Is What Detroit Could Look Like In 2033

This Is What Detroit Could Look Like In 2033 | #georic | Scoop.it
If you've never been to Detroit and only know what you see in the news, a story about the city's future could seem confusing. Detroit is bankrupt.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

2033 seems pretty hopeful for the city that was once the Ford motor capital and the city of Rock and Roll. It is interesting to note in this article the various before and after images and the way they hope that this bankrupt city be look in 15 years. There are hopes to completely transform certain landscapes and renovate old warehouses for recreational/educational purposes. There is hope for the city of Detroit as developers continue planning and working on investing money making condemned areas livable and changing the economic culture of each neighborhood.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 27, 2013 10:09 AM

Yes, the news about Detroit has been grim, as de-industrialization has negatively impacted this region more than any other in the United States.  Still, many consider Detroit's economic problems akin to flesh wounds and organ failure.  Extending the analogy, they see Detroit as having 'good bones,' something to build on for a new future.  This article represents some visions of that new future.  


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:38 PM

Looking at these pictures it it is amzaing to think that by 2033 Detroit could look like this. However I think the most confusing part to me would be where the money is coming from to rebuild this city. The city was recently declared bankrupt. How is it that they are going to be able to afford the billions of dollars needed to get detroit to this point? However if the plan does go well and detroit ends up building all of these attraction sites and educational building I believe that Detroit will no longer have a fear of debt, and the culture there would be a lot different. I think this would be a place that families and people vaction to. There would be many nice state parks to visit, a beautiful downtown area with hotels and other attractions. This is the exacct opposite of the type of experience you would have going to Detriot today. By making these changes and moving forward I think there is a huge culture change to will occur for the better of Detroit. If they can pull it off I don't think Detriot will have to worry about bankruptcy in the future. 

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The End of the Nation-State?

The End of the Nation-State? | #georic | Scoop.it
With rapid urbanization under way, cities want to call their own shots. Increasingly, they can.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

The end of Soverign nation states has alot to do with how interact with other states into a more integrated regional economy. The global community is realizing its importance of woking together to mazimize on trade and technology building as an economic world effort. This would blur the lines of independent soverign countires and bring regions together for economic puprposes even redrawing regional lines. Cities want more autonomy on responding to urbanization and move more away from being identified as a nation state. It is the desire to listen less to what washington has to say and act more as an independent state which makes more decisons with the regions around it to mazimize on rapid city growth and the money making opportunities that a re created from a rapidly changing global community.

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Dovid's curator insight, October 17, 2013 8:02 AM

Citizens of the world, worldwide currencies and descentralized power being transformed! Far behind will linger the memory of old nationalism and patriotism. Communities will take over what's rightfully theirs and will make decisions for everybody's benefit! 

Keileem's comment, October 17, 2013 3:41 PM
Just end reading a book: the end of the nation state, but than in mind a non-democratic eu government.
Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:31 AM

Good examples: NYC, Washington DC, Brasilia, Hong Kong, London, and many more.

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Fair Housing

Fair Housing | #georic | Scoop.it
Where you live is important. It can dictate quality of schools and hospitals, as well as things like cancer rates, unemployment, or whether the city repairs roads in your neighborhood. On this week's show, stories about destiny by address.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

this podcast can gives us insight into other peoples experiences and decision making processes in choosing were to live and how that effects life for them. Depending on where we live rent may be cheaper but also living conditions and employment may not be all that great. Gentrification or community improvement also shows us, this renovating process helps change our old neighborhoods and tries to create better places for people to life, it speaks about fair housing and the various experiences that people have in the American way of living.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 27, 2013 1:50 PM

This hour-long podcast addresses some has key issues in urban geography by exploring the history of redlining, the Fair Housing Act and other fair housing initiatives.  The urban cultural mosaic of the United States and the neighborhoods of our cities have been greatly shaped by these issues.   Currently gentrification is reshaping many U.S. cities and fits into the wider scope of the issues raised in the podcast.


Tags: housingracism, urban, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood, ethnicity, race, podcast.

Mrs. B's curator insight, December 3, 2013 8:44 PM

PODCAST FOR URBAN UNIT

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17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

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harish magan's comment, November 6, 2013 1:02 PM
Great Source for studies.
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

Mrs. K's curator insight, August 27, 6:41 AM

2G Contemporary Period