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Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
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Pipeline On Wheels: Trains Are Winning Big Off U.S. Oil

Pipeline On Wheels: Trains Are Winning Big Off U.S. Oil | #georic | Scoop.it
The railroad industry is eager to be the go-to oil shipper, but some worry it's moving too fast.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

The idea of using trains instead of oil pipelines in the North Dakota regions is smart, over the idea of the time and energy it takes to transport oil through pipes. Big industry always causes parts of the enviornment to suffer but the lesser of the evils must be chosen. In the area of shipping oil on trains it is the sandy prarie like areas that can suffer physically. With oil business fracking has also been a big issue were rocks deep beneath the ground are broken up to release oil up to the surface. Yes this brings companies lots of money, but causes harm to homes, leaking oil, causing explosions and even earthquakes. This can be tricky especially when these kinds of companies are supported by the federal government

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 7, 2013 11:38 AM

Many hoping to stop environmental degradation of Canada's Tar Sands and the Dakotas "Kuwait on the Prairie" have opposed the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.  It's been decades since crude oil has been shipped by rail in the United States but fracking technologies have opened up areas without oil pipelines to become major producers.  As demonstrated in this NPR podcast, the railroad industry has seized on this vacuum and since 2009 has been supplying the oil industry the means to get their product to the market.   


Tagstransportation, industry, economic, energy, resources, environment, environment modify.

Connie Anderson's curator insight, December 8, 2013 12:01 PM

"Forward on climate?" This news is backwards and at least 40,000 people who attended "Forward on Climate" rallies throughout our nation in February 2013 will continue to question, protest peacefully, and convince others that we MUST reduce our dependence on oil no matter how it is transported!

ManuMan's curator insight, December 8, 2013 7:55 PM

As steel and rail built this county, oil and rail will rebuild it. 

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
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Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | #georic | Scoop.it

"A floating vessel that is longer than the Empire State Building is high has taken to the water for the first time.  Despite appearances, Prelude cannot strictly be described as a ship as it needs to be towed to its destination rather than travelling under its own power."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

The Worlds biggest ship to be launched soon by Shell is an amazing feat, created by human ingenuity. It is incredible that it is longer than the Empire state building. it is difficult to imagine how an object so long even moves by itself. Nicaragua is attempting to make a canal Bigger than Panamas to support a ship thate size of the prelude that will operate off the coast of Australia for the next 25 years. The fact that it needs to be towed to its destination makes one question if its really a ship or not. Regardless Shell will share the cost of the Oil vessell once its finished being built

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, December 7, 2013 10:17 AM

This is a crazy and a testament to how we keep trying to move more and more material and conduct more and more operations across our world ocean.

Julia Rose Turco's curator insight, December 11, 2013 5:02 PM

Wow, this is interesting! I can't believe its that long! I wonder how long it took them to build it? Also, where is it going?  Also, why would they need it to be so big? Why can't they just use a smaller ship and make more trips? But overall this is very cool.

Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 9:34 AM

I've got a weak spot for massive ships, plain and simple. I think there's even a future in ship-based cities which move around the world's oceans. Eventually ships can become so large and so advanced that the normal threats associated with the open ocean will do little to scratch them. For a comparison, the ship pictured is the Prelude FLNG, and it's almost twice the length of the Titanic.