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Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
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Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs

Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs | #georic | Scoop.it
Facing religious discrimination in the Hindu-dominated job market, many are forced to assume fake identities.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:11 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

Jackson and Marduk's curator insight, October 27, 2014 4:03 PM

Religion: The main religion in India is Hindu. Since this is so widely practiced in India, other religions are discriminated. This article explains how some people have to act like they practice Hindu just to get a job.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 2, 3:39 PM

Having to masquerade as a different religion in order to get a job is not a concept that most Americans are familiar with, as we live in a highly secular society.  India, which too is supposed to be a secular society, is failing at this as the article shows.  Muslim women have to pretend to be Hindus in order to get a job, as many Hindus (who are dominant in India) will refuse to higher people who follow Islam.  There are historical reasons for this, as the Hindus of the country were dominated by the Muslims for years under the Mughal Empire.  However, it is a sad fact that the secular country of India which is striving towards becoming a superpower would treat citizens of a different faith in such a poor manner.  This is very interesting for Americans to think about, and it even parallels our history.  In the 19th Century and even the earlier 20th century we were much more aware of religions and ethnicity and these groups stuck together, however by the time of the 1960s and 70s this landscape was rapidly disappearing.  India should itself move on from this practice, yet I believe it will be difficult given the nature of the situation, and the baggage carried by the groups.

 

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
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Fair Housing

Fair Housing | #georic | Scoop.it
Where you live is important. It can dictate quality of schools and hospitals, as well as things like cancer rates, unemployment, or whether the city repairs roads in your neighborhood. On this week's show, stories about destiny by address.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

this podcast can gives us insight into other peoples experiences and decision making processes in choosing were to live and how that effects life for them. Depending on where we live rent may be cheaper but also living conditions and employment may not be all that great. Gentrification or community improvement also shows us, this renovating process helps change our old neighborhoods and tries to create better places for people to life, it speaks about fair housing and the various experiences that people have in the American way of living.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 27, 2013 1:50 PM

This hour-long podcast addresses some has key issues in urban geography by exploring the history of redlining, the Fair Housing Act and other fair housing initiatives.  The urban cultural mosaic of the United States and the neighborhoods of our cities have been greatly shaped by these issues.   Currently gentrification is reshaping many U.S. cities and fits into the wider scope of the issues raised in the podcast.


Tags: housingracism, urban, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood, ethnicity, race, podcast.

Mrs. B's curator insight, December 3, 2013 8:44 PM

PODCAST FOR URBAN UNIT

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Protests and the World Cup

Protests and the World Cup | #georic | Scoop.it
Fury, anarchy, martyrdom: Why the youth of Brazil are (forever) protesting, and how their anger may consume the World Cup.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

it is great to know that young people in countries like Brazil are standing up and being heard though it costs some their lives to protest social ills. it is interesting how sporting events  like the World Cup or usually tied to government and poltics. A country wants to show the world the best that their country has, but these young people are letting the world know that the poor are being overlooked, and what the opulance of big cities and beautiful stadiums does not reflect how poor people are being overlooked. I support these demonstraters and it is important that young people everywhere gain the courage to protest for Just causes

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:48 AM

(Sidebar I used this article while gathering information for my research paper). Even though this is happening in Brazil i would like to beleive that this is exaclty what the United States founding fathers would of wanted us to do if our goverment was blatanly mistreating us like the politicians in Brazil. The youth of brazil realized what a moumentus occasion this was and didnt waste their chance to show the world their problems which forced the hand of the politicians into a political reform. Great example of how can make a difference if you have enough followers.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 2014 2:08 PM

This is about so much more than the World Cup. It is protest against government corruption and politicians lining their pockets with money under the guise of public works.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 3:01 PM

When construction was occurring for the World Cup, a friend of mine was teaching in an extremely poor area of Brazil.  Seeing his pictures compare to the ones on ESPN really opened my eyes to the immense poverty gap.  Yes, soccer is major for Brazil and is extremely profitable however we see here a moral issue.  Billions spent on something as trivial as a sport, when millions are living in extreme poverty. Regardless of how serious people are about sports at the end of the day it means nothing when the country is comfortable with using billions to fund a recreation rather than feed their own people.