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The Islands of Rhode Island

The Islands of Rhode Island | #georic | Scoop.it

"How many islands are in Rhode Island?"


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

It is interesting that RI as a small state has alot of areas to discover with a map and a good drive. There are many islands near jamestown and Newport and also near Westerly that resemble the Jettey rock like formations that  also have lighthouses. There is so much to see and discover for its natural beauty. I am still amazed at the areas yet to discover in Rhode island. There are about thirty islands in Rhode Island Aquidneck is the largest, Conanicut is the second largest and Prudence ranks third

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 5, 2013 9:08 PM

I recently received this question and immediately thought that this is a great geographic question, but one that geographic tools can be used to find the answer.  I downloaded all the Rhode Island toponymns (place names) listed by the United States Board on Geographic Names and filtered out all the listed Islands (108 is the answer!!).  A spreadsheet of the data didn't help to visualize this data so I created this interactive mapOnly 1 of the locations didn't have coordinates, some are scarcely more than rocks, and this is only according to the the U.S. Board on Geographic Names, but this is the most complete map of islands in the state of Rhode Island that I could produce.  Additionally, here is an article about some sailors who sought to explore every island of the Narragansett Bay.  

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Happy GIS Day


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

Geospatial awarness and application is important GIS Day allows people to learn about and plug in to present technology that helps make geopraphy more palpable and easier to understand. There are more and more resources and advancements that have been made available to teach us and simply things in the world around us. understanding relatability and awareness helps us to answer questions about geography that we might not know because of distance and allows those who are preparing to be social studies or history majors to communicate to their students a better understanding of the world around them, and as time passes more helpful resources will be teaching aides in the classroom

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, November 21, 2013 3:46 AM

Interesting, educational and new learning for some.

Pájaro Chogüí's curator insight, November 26, 2013 4:42 PM

torne47@yahoo.es

 

Mr Inniss's curator insight, July 21, 2014 7:03 PM

Well, you may have missed 2013, but the next one is going on in Birmingham on the 20th of November: http://www.gisday.com/gis-day-events-map.html

 

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Create Your Own Map

Create Your Own Map | #georic | Scoop.it

"Create a color-coded Visited States Map, showing off your road travel in the United States and Canada."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

create your own map is interesing because it allows you to visualize and share with others your own journey around the country in terms of residence and visits being in seperate colors. Compared to the size of the country I myself have only been to very few states. I have yet to go to Alaska, Hawaii, the Midwest parts, and much of the Western part of the country. I am convinced that extensive travel is something i will accomplish in the yeard ahead. For the professor himself he still has several more states to visit. It is propbable that he will visit many more in the years to come

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Charles Adami's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:52 PM

Students color code states involved in expedition. Louisiana Purchase , and US circa 1803.

Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:40 PM

I took the liberty of using this site which was linked on my Professor's page to create my own map of travels within the United States! Green represents states which I've spent many nights, amber for states which I briefly passed through, and red for states I've never been to at all. I didn't include the map for Canada as well, but I've been to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Ontario primarily. I'm very into the idea of travel and intend to visit as many places as I can in my lifetime, but I have focused much of my journeys for the future into foreign countries. This map gave me the hint that I might want to focus homeward a bit more.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:40 PM

http://vsm.defocus.net/img/vsm-28fc2e56c17b6506f2405817cce289c4.png This link is a picture of my map. It was divided by different colors. Red was for places you have not seen. Amber was for places you have seen some and maybe slept there a couple times. Blue meant that you have been there a fair amount of times and green meant that you spent the most time their and slept there on multiple occasions. Unfortunately, almost my whole map was the color red. I haven't been many places. The only places that I have consistently been to are Florida, New York, and Massachusetts. Connecticut on rare occasions and of course Rhode Island was the number one place on my map. I hope to one day turn all those red states into green states.

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Urban Exploration

Urban Exploration | #georic | Scoop.it

"The French have a wonderful word—flâneur—for someone who seeks to explore and understand the nature of a city’s landscape, usually by taking spontaneous adventures amidst the ebb and flow of life going on around them. In this week’s theme we invite you to lose yourself reading about the flâneur-esque adventures of Maptia’s streetwise connoisseurs and explore a myriad of cities through their eyes."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This article demonstrates that there are so many places around the world yet to visit and it is important to plan and save as soon as possible becuase seeing all the beautiful cities of the world ma ytake several years, so preperation in is a must, From Cities in Asia, to Paris, London, Russia and Turkey you will be able to travel on festive dates and examine the landscapes that define these beautiful metropolises. From Cathedrals, to Big Ben, and Haggia Sophia in Instanbul, one will be marveled by the multicutural beauty and night life that exists around the world

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 30, 2013 11:16 PM

If you have yet to discover Maptia, a hybrid map/storytelling online platform, this is a good introduction.  This article also serves as portal for 21 city profiles of cities around the world. 


Tags: neighborhoodurban, place.

Helen Rowling's curator insight, December 1, 2013 8:18 PM

Gr8 immersion of stories of lives in other countries.

Tony Gough's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:09 AM

Travel the world and read the short stories to learn more!

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How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines

How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines | #georic | Scoop.it
Volunteers across the world are building the digital infrastructure for the organization's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

online maps are being used to help locate the best way possible to help transport food and resources to those most in need. They van locate bridges and the world is pulling together with tehcnolgy and accurate maps to help the  American red Cross maximize in time and manpower. It seems that after Hurricane Katrina and the Earthquakes in Haiti and Japan, We have been improving our strategies for how to best help people around the globe come together put our time energy and resources together to best help people whose lives have been devasted and crushed by the forces of mother nature.

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:28 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  Can you join in and help?


Tags: disasters, mappingPhilippines, STEM.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:14 PM

Having a map of the current landscape, after the typhoon will speed up relief and rescue efforts by showing areas to land and set up help stations. The digital world is immediate now and this will change how organizations such as the Red Cross provide relief to suffering people.