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Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia?

Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia? | #georic | Scoop.it

"This map illustrates the country's deep division – and why the protests might not be what you think. Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe?"


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

language and ethnicity make a big difference in a country like ukraine, ethncity usually brings along with it relgious and political ties. It would be easier for a country divided as ukraine to ramain autonomous and trade with Russia, and the EU. It would not hurt the country to stay that way.  Right now citizens are tearing down russia related statues and are politcally divided not wanting to merge with Russia with their president. it is important to choose what is most viable for their citizens and country

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 11, 2013 6:30 PM

The country of Ukraine is both ethnically and linguistically divided and since the fall of the Soviet Union, the partisan politics have mirrored these divisions.  The northwestern portion of the country is primarily ethnic Ukrainian and with the majority speaking Ukrainian.  This section of the country that is hoping to strengthen economic and political ties with the EU and face Europe; those that aren't as bullish on the EU here at least want to explore other options so they aren't overpowered by Moscow's shadow.  The southeastern portion of Ukraine primarily speaks Russian with sizeable ethnic Russian populations (although many ethnic Ukrainians speak Russian here); not surprisingly, this is the part of the country that would rather join in an economic union with Russia and other former Soviet Republics, or at least not turn their backs on Moscow. 


Questions to Ponder: Why are language and ethnicity often tied to political orientation?  Why might trading with all economic partners not be as viable an option?

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:52 PM

Language and ethnicity are often tied to a political oriantation because maybe the people feel as if they can connect to someones ideas or beliefs because they are the same gender, race, or share the same cultural traditions. People like to be able to relate to others. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 11:29 AM

There is such a solid division right through the middle of the country maybe it should split like Czechoslovakia did. The North can go with the EU and the south can go with Russia.

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(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages

(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages | #georic | Scoop.it

"What language is spoken in Croatia? Croatian is now the 24th official language of the European Union, but there are disagreements about whether it’s a distinct language or just a slightly different dialect of Serbian. Serbian nationalists believe that everyone shares the same language, “Serbian”. But many Croats persist in making their national language as distinct from Serbian as possible. Listeners will discover how politics is intruding on language, and how it is changing the map of linguistic patterns in unexpected ways."

 

Tags: language, Croatia, political, podcast, Maps 101.


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

These countries share issues that stem from cultural dialects that come from the standard Serbian language spoken in that region. These growing language differences can cause poltical geographical changes that interfere with Serbian solidarity. The croatians feel that they speak a different language while all serbians claim that it is one language. These differences may cause a wider seperation among the peoples politically changing language patterns in these regions where ancient Macedonia and Greek cutures once pervaded. They have experienced national divisons in the past, these language differences may cause their identity in the EU to shift to have no cultural relation to their immediately surrounding Serbian countries.

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CCRES's comment, November 6, 2013 1:06 AM
Baška tablet , Croatian: Bašćanska ploča, pronounced is one of the first monuments containing an inscription in the Croatian recension of the Church Slavonic language, dating from the year 1100.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 12:03 PM

This part of the world has been so mixed up for so long. Each country wants their own identity, language and name but the borders are continually changing. Although these fights seem petty to me (an American) I am sure they mean quite a bit to the people living in these areas. National identity is very important to humans in general. Where we come from is the basis of who we are.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:51 AM

Languages are sometimes a mystery to countries but mostly has to do with who's occupying these countries and where the countries are located.  Croatia is only a few countries away from Serbia so the fact that the language they speak may/not be close to Serbian is no surprise. Migration and other factors contribute to the language developed in specific countries.

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Cultural Syncretism

Cultural Syncretism | #georic | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 8, 2013 5:39 AM

I found this image on social media from a great geography teacher (link to his site--looking for APHG group activities?  Try this).  This picture taken at the Jewish Community Center (JCC) in Memphis, TN shows an intrguing linguistic combination that I had never imagined before.  This is referred to as cultural syncretism, where two or more cultures or cultural traits combine together to make something new.  Globalization and migration are making more cultural combinations than we've ever seen before in this human mosaic we call home.


Tags: language, culture, the South, APHG, religion, landscape.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 10, 2013 9:01 PM

Interesting 


Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 8:02 PM

This was taken in Memphis, TN. I liked how it mixes the religion with the surrounding culture and dialect, really interesting and shows that people can have the same religion and different backgrounds. 

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How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines

How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines | #georic | Scoop.it

Few know "boondocks" is a relic of U.S. military occupation in the Philippines.

 


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

We have all heard the phrase living in the "Boonies" The boondocks was a word that was taken from a philipino word called Bundok, that meant the guerilla warfare they were experiencing from phillipino insurgents during the Spanish American War with the America. In this war which Teddy Roosevelt helped lead we gained US Puerto Rico and Guam as new Territories from the Treaty of Paris. The war was fought against Emilio Aguinaldo who was a master at guerilla tactics against American soldiers. This was a desperate war involving coloniazation or exerting our power as a country against other countries that ammassed a huge death toll. Now that we know the word boondok, is not an all American word that was popularized in the 1950's but it was actually taken from the Phillipino language during a time of fighting in the Jungle or the Sticks. But boondocks also refers to a people living around mouintainous regions. Just some food for thought.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 7:06 PM

I imaged that the term 'the boondocks' was of Asian origin, but I was surprised to learn how this U.S. military lingo was able to become a mainstream term.  The Tagalog word bundok means mountain and given the guerrilla warfare tactics, U.S. soldiers thought of their enemies as hiding 'in the boondocks.' This term spread throughout the military to mean an isolated region, but today the term has morphed from its military-based meaning of mountainous jungles to one that can also describe a sparsely populated rural America.  This is a fascinating article from NPR's Code Switch team that focuses on issues of culture, identity and race. 


Tags: language, toponyms, historical, conflict, culturediffusion.