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Spatial Navigation Before GPS

Spatial Navigation Before GPS | #georic | Scoop.it

"Giant 70-foot concrete arrows that point your way across the country, left behind by a forgotten age of US mail delivery.  Long before the days of radio (and those convenient little smartphone applications), the US Postal service began a cross-country air mail service using army war surplus planes from World War I.  The federal government funded enormous concrete arrows to be built every 10 miles or so along established airmail routes they were each built alongside a 50 foot tall tower with a rotating gas-powered light. These airway beacons are said to have been visible from a distance of 10 miles high."


Via Seth Dixon, Tony Aguilar
Tony Aguilar's insight:

before modern GPS on planes it was interesting that they used these giant markers. It was interesting that a method so simple was used to communicate to pilots needed mail directions. Someone had to be looking outside looking for the next giant arrow. We have definitley come a long way with our GPS systems on planes, but understanding this tool helps us understanding how simple things were back then and the geospatial knowledge and awareness that was necessary to give pilots an understanding about direction once upon a time

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:49 PM

Adesso sembra incredibile che si usasse un sistema simile per guidare la posta aerea. Forse a quei tempi sembrava normale. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:14 AM

I love articles like this one where they talk about the collide of different times. This article speaks of huge concrete arrows which were left from 1930's air mail routes. sadly most of the towers that were paired with the arrows have been dismantled but still really cool that these directional arrows from the past can still be found almost 90 years later.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:44 PM

Wow technology has come a long way in just a short amount of time! We would still be using  those stone arrows if it wasn't for the invention of the GPS. 

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
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Spatial Navigation Before GPS

Spatial Navigation Before GPS | #georic | Scoop.it

"Giant 70-foot concrete arrows that point your way across the country, left behind by a forgotten age of US mail delivery.  Long before the days of radio (and those convenient little smartphone applications), the US Postal service began a cross-country air mail service using army war surplus planes from World War I.  The federal government funded enormous concrete arrows to be built every 10 miles or so along established airmail routes they were each built alongside a 50 foot tall tower with a rotating gas-powered light. These airway beacons are said to have been visible from a distance of 10 miles high."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:49 PM

Adesso sembra incredibile che si usasse un sistema simile per guidare la posta aerea. Forse a quei tempi sembrava normale. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:14 AM

I love articles like this one where they talk about the collide of different times. This article speaks of huge concrete arrows which were left from 1930's air mail routes. sadly most of the towers that were paired with the arrows have been dismantled but still really cool that these directional arrows from the past can still be found almost 90 years later.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:44 PM

Wow technology has come a long way in just a short amount of time! We would still be using  those stone arrows if it wasn't for the invention of the GPS. 

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
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Create Your Own Map

Create Your Own Map | #georic | Scoop.it

"Create a color-coded Visited States Map, showing off your road travel in the United States and Canada."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

create your own map is interesing because it allows you to visualize and share with others your own journey around the country in terms of residence and visits being in seperate colors. Compared to the size of the country I myself have only been to very few states. I have yet to go to Alaska, Hawaii, the Midwest parts, and much of the Western part of the country. I am convinced that extensive travel is something i will accomplish in the yeard ahead. For the professor himself he still has several more states to visit. It is propbable that he will visit many more in the years to come

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Charles Adami's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:52 PM

Students color code states involved in expedition. Louisiana Purchase , and US circa 1803.

Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:40 PM

I took the liberty of using this site which was linked on my Professor's page to create my own map of travels within the United States! Green represents states which I've spent many nights, amber for states which I briefly passed through, and red for states I've never been to at all. I didn't include the map for Canada as well, but I've been to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Ontario primarily. I'm very into the idea of travel and intend to visit as many places as I can in my lifetime, but I have focused much of my journeys for the future into foreign countries. This map gave me the hint that I might want to focus homeward a bit more.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:40 PM

http://vsm.defocus.net/img/vsm-28fc2e56c17b6506f2405817cce289c4.png This link is a picture of my map. It was divided by different colors. Red was for places you have not seen. Amber was for places you have seen some and maybe slept there a couple times. Blue meant that you have been there a fair amount of times and green meant that you spent the most time their and slept there on multiple occasions. Unfortunately, almost my whole map was the color red. I haven't been many places. The only places that I have consistently been to are Florida, New York, and Massachusetts. Connecticut on rare occasions and of course Rhode Island was the number one place on my map. I hope to one day turn all those red states into green states.

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Happy GIS Day


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

Geospatial awarness and application is important GIS Day allows people to learn about and plug in to present technology that helps make geopraphy more palpable and easier to understand. There are more and more resources and advancements that have been made available to teach us and simply things in the world around us. understanding relatability and awareness helps us to answer questions about geography that we might not know because of distance and allows those who are preparing to be social studies or history majors to communicate to their students a better understanding of the world around them, and as time passes more helpful resources will be teaching aides in the classroom

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, November 21, 2013 3:46 AM

Interesting, educational and new learning for some.

Pájaro Chogüí's curator insight, November 26, 2013 4:42 PM

torne47@yahoo.es

 

Mr Inniss's curator insight, July 21, 2014 7:03 PM

Well, you may have missed 2013, but the next one is going on in Birmingham on the 20th of November: http://www.gisday.com/gis-day-events-map.html

 

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
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Spatial Navigation Before GPS

Spatial Navigation Before GPS | #georic | Scoop.it

"Giant 70-foot concrete arrows that point your way across the country, left behind by a forgotten age of US mail delivery.  Long before the days of radio (and those convenient little smartphone applications), the US Postal service began a cross-country air mail service using army war surplus planes from World War I.  The federal government funded enormous concrete arrows to be built every 10 miles or so along established airmail routes they were each built alongside a 50 foot tall tower with a rotating gas-powered light. These airway beacons are said to have been visible from a distance of 10 miles high."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:49 PM

Adesso sembra incredibile che si usasse un sistema simile per guidare la posta aerea. Forse a quei tempi sembrava normale. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:14 AM

I love articles like this one where they talk about the collide of different times. This article speaks of huge concrete arrows which were left from 1930's air mail routes. sadly most of the towers that were paired with the arrows have been dismantled but still really cool that these directional arrows from the past can still be found almost 90 years later.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:44 PM

Wow technology has come a long way in just a short amount of time! We would still be using  those stone arrows if it wasn't for the invention of the GPS. 

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can We Save Venice?

Can We Save Venice? | #georic | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

It is interesting to know that Venice is sure to sink but not anytime close to our lifetime. Our children may see a very different Venice because of Structural errosian. There should be more preicse research done as some researchers believe that the complete destruction will happen sooner than later. one of the finding says that Venice is siking 7.8 inches every one hundred years. and another finding says that it will be gone within one generation. I think that it is important to visit nenice sooner than later because we really do not know whats going to happen. I beleive that restoration should be high on the list for preserevation of this beautiful water filled city. I want to be able to enjoy a romantic evening with my wife there.

 

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:42 PM

This detailed account of the problems faced by the people, and city, of Venice is a great account of the idea of Human Environment Interaction that is central to Human Geography. Human actions are causing the city to sink while more human actions are attempting to raise the city out of the water.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 28, 2013 3:24 PM

It is no surprise to anyone that one day the beautiful city of Venice will one day be completely submerged under water. However looking at this map makes it hopeful that the process may be slowed down or even stopped! Looking at the map the green boxes represent the parts of Venice that have been uplifted, while the red boxes represent the parts that are sinking. What was surprising was that there appeared to be more green boxes on the map than red. Most of the boxes, both green and red, are along the coastline. I would think since most of the damage is along the coast line it would be a little easier to try and uplift. Hopefully the green boxes can make up for the red boxes in order to keep Venice from continually sinking. With these advances who knows where we will be in even another twenty years. We may be able to continue to uplift Venice to prevent it from submerging under water. It appears that the city is making progress in this process from the data given in the map. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:53 AM

As we all know Venice is known for its lack of streets because the city is navigated by canals. This map shows where humans are actually causing the city to sink (in red) and where through restoration and consideration are helping the city stay afloat (Green). These little acts of restoration can become increasinly important in the future with growing population density. Lets hope that Venice doesnt get to populated though so the next generation dosent have to refer to it as the lost underwater city of venice.