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Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
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Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This video allows us to remember the devastation that is caused oversees. It also gives us the ability to plan years ahead to be most prepared in minutes the moment we realize a tsunami is on its way. It is dangerous to curiously look at tsunami flood waters when a matter of minutes is the difference needed to act before a situation escalates We will never forget the devastation caused to the ancient nation of Japan, and the best we can do is coninue to be prepared for the future to come with the most effecient action steps possibly to ensure safety and save the most lives

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 1:52 PM

So, I will never forget this morning because my brother was living in Japan at the time and I remember getting a text from him saying "we are ok."  My brother is a bit of a jokester so I figured he had something up his sleeve, however, when I woke up and heard of the destruction, I was so relieved to know he and his family were safe.  For the next month my brother flew rescue missions and brought water and food to the survivors.  He had taken hundred of pictures, and I was able to witness first hand how devastating the tsunami had been.  My heart still goes out to those people, and I am forever grateful that my brother is alive and well.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
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Can We Save Venice?

Can We Save Venice? | #georic | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

It is interesting to know that Venice is sure to sink but not anytime close to our lifetime. Our children may see a very different Venice because of Structural errosian. There should be more preicse research done as some researchers believe that the complete destruction will happen sooner than later. one of the finding says that Venice is siking 7.8 inches every one hundred years. and another finding says that it will be gone within one generation. I think that it is important to visit nenice sooner than later because we really do not know whats going to happen. I beleive that restoration should be high on the list for preserevation of this beautiful water filled city. I want to be able to enjoy a romantic evening with my wife there.

 

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:42 PM

This detailed account of the problems faced by the people, and city, of Venice is a great account of the idea of Human Environment Interaction that is central to Human Geography. Human actions are causing the city to sink while more human actions are attempting to raise the city out of the water.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 28, 2013 3:24 PM

It is no surprise to anyone that one day the beautiful city of Venice will one day be completely submerged under water. However looking at this map makes it hopeful that the process may be slowed down or even stopped! Looking at the map the green boxes represent the parts of Venice that have been uplifted, while the red boxes represent the parts that are sinking. What was surprising was that there appeared to be more green boxes on the map than red. Most of the boxes, both green and red, are along the coastline. I would think since most of the damage is along the coast line it would be a little easier to try and uplift. Hopefully the green boxes can make up for the red boxes in order to keep Venice from continually sinking. With these advances who knows where we will be in even another twenty years. We may be able to continue to uplift Venice to prevent it from submerging under water. It appears that the city is making progress in this process from the data given in the map. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:53 AM

As we all know Venice is known for its lack of streets because the city is navigated by canals. This map shows where humans are actually causing the city to sink (in red) and where through restoration and consideration are helping the city stay afloat (Green). These little acts of restoration can become increasinly important in the future with growing population density. Lets hope that Venice doesnt get to populated though so the next generation dosent have to refer to it as the lost underwater city of venice.

Rescooped by Tony Aguilar from Geography Education
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Submarine Canyons

Submarine Canyons | #georic | Scoop.it

"Submarine canyons were identified by the pre-SONAR mappers, but it wasn’t until this technological advancement that we realized how common a feature they are. We now know that there are hundreds (perhaps thousands depending on your definition) of submarine canyons incising into continental shelves and slopes all over Earth."

 

Tags: physical, environment, water, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

submarine canyons are a natural underwater phenomenon with no clear explainable cause. They are located in parts of the world sush as New Zealand and off the coast of Santa Monica california. These canyons at the bottom of the ocean may have been ancient rivers from before prehistoric times, and the erosion and subduction of the tectonic plates over millions of years leave the remains of channels of rivers from the past. Another theory is that they are caused by water forces that caused the sea bed to erode and make way for an actuall canyon. With the use of Sonar technology we are still discovering phenomons of the submarine world as sciene progresses. These canyons are common and are found all over the Earth and give is an understanding of what the world may have looked like long ago.

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