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Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | #georic | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

The author of thid article shares how his father moved to the farm in search for economic prosperity and opportunity. Then as a soon he desires one day to make his fathers farm into a place were organic food would be sold one day. Due to land projects and government needing the land his fathers orginal agricultural enterprise in the Minnesota region shifted. I was very suprised after reading this article that the best way to have economic and environmental sustainability is to work with with the markets and develop genetically modified foods as the most viable way to create a surplus in a highly urbanized growing landscape. I found it very saf fake food is prefered over real food that ws once made though the old school agricultural process of sowing reaping and harvesting natural foods to be placed in the market and provided to people.

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Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 27, 11:24 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

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Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms

Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms | #georic | Scoop.it

"Feedlots, a new series of images crafted by British artist Mishka Henner, uses publicly available satellite imagery to show the origins of mass-produced meat products."

 

Tags: Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.  


Via Seth Dixon
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Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 6:00 PM

Does this motivate you to become #vegetarian? 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:19 AM

Some wild photgraphs about the devastation of mass aggriculture to the enviroment. Also their is a nice little bit about the laws behind why most people havent seen farming conditions till recent, such as some states preventing people to take pictures of their farms or factories without consent. If you are intreged by this article i suggest you watch FOOD Inc. This movie goes into great detail about how our food is made. But caution this may be one instance where igroance is Bliss because once you know exactly how your food is made you may never be able to eat some meats again. This movie can also be found on Netflix.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:35 AM

British artist Mishka Henner took photographs and enhanced the colors of feedlots to reveal the agribusiness of meat production. Photographs of feedlots are considered illegal and the legal repercussions of Mishka Henner are not clear at the moment, but the photographs are shocking and reveal again how little Americans know about their food production. 

Americans have changed the places and utilized them to build agribusiness empires and have introduced new problems to the landscape of feedlot and farming towns.