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The State of USA Economy

The State of USA Economy | #georic | Scoop.it
From Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

This is an interesting map that uses color to show us economic differences nationwide. The red stands for bad and the green is fo r better economic regions. Southern parts of Texas appear to be above average and also georgia and the Carolinas. It is interesting that MA was red in terms of below national average. I was also impressed that Minesota was Green on the Above average this map is a quick fact lens into national conditions giving us a glimpse of the current state in our country.

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James and Drew's curator insight, December 1, 2013 6:38 PM

This article is on the economy of North America. It includes a map of the economic activity in the United States

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A Wave of Sewing Jobs as Orders Pile Up at U.S. Factories

A Wave of Sewing Jobs as Orders Pile Up at U.S. Factories | #georic | Scoop.it
Factories are finding that years of doing business overseas has withered what once was a thriving textile and apparel work force in the United States.

 


Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's insight:

Due to the growing demands of more domestically made goods. companies have been opening jobs for American workers for specialized jobs that machines cannot do. in the past year there have been issues concerning the fires in Bangledesh, and companies having been creating jobs with promises to train people from scratch, there also have been difficulties in finding people to work for them or groups of young people that are interested in finding those kind of jobs, in areas such  as Minnesota. They are also attracting immigrant workers and people with Spanish and math skills to grow their companies. i think that it is going to take a while to grow a culture of Americans that are interested in taking jobs that involve menial or detailed meticulous requirements. Anyways it is better as an American culture to know that more of the products we use actually get to say made in the USA

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 9:33 AM

This article highlights the biggest problem in the American job market today, the skill gap.  People have been told for years that the only way to a good job is to go to college.  This is not always true and this article highlights this.  There are skilled trades out there but no one skilled to do them.  This problem needs to be addressed so that the unemployed work force can be trained to do these types of jobs.  Young people today seem to feel that the only way is a college degree but this article highlights the other paths to work which are through skilled trade labor.  People complain that nothing is made here but there are reasons for that and when companies try to bring industry back to America they encounter the skill gap. 

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 4:06 PM

Manufacturing companies have to weigh the pros and cons of outsourcing or staying domestic.  Many companies have chosen profits over quality and safety by outsourcing jobs over the past couple decades.  Outsourcing of jobs is a product of globalization.  However, the internet and other informational resources are also a large part of globalization which have allowed citizens of the United States to be exposed to what is actually happening in these outsourced manufacturing factories (similar to the role photography played in exposing behind-the-scenes truths of the United State's domestic manufacturing during the Industrial Revolution).  The demand for domestic-made products is increasing, and companies are listening.  However, the years that these jobs have been overseas have allowed not only the specialized skills of domestic workers to disappear, but also the creation of stigmas towards these jobs.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 10, 3:16 PM

This article is quite interesting.  Everyone seems to complain that more product needs to be made in the USA instead of elsewhere in poorer countries.  This company in Minnesota is doing just that.  After receiving complaints about not enough product being made here they decided to leave countries where safety is not such an issue and bring it home.  Now the problem lies with finding skilled workers here.  Being a 'sewer' isn't very glamourous and not appealing to the youth of America.  This being said, it is going to be very difficult to bring jobs back to America when no one here is interested in putting the energy forth to gain the skills needed to hold these positions.