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Rescooped by Courtney Burns from Geography Education
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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Georgraphy World News | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Burns's insight:

When we first looked at this picture in class there was no way that I thought this map could be true. We are warned all the time to be careful what we look at on the internet, because for the most part a lot of the information is not true. When we looked at this photo in class we zoomed in on the area in the circle and first determined what was included  in that circle. Once we were able to detrmine what cities were within that circle we were then able to look up the population in each of those cities. We added up the total of each city to get the total population of the places within the circle. Then we researched the total population of the world. Once we were able to find this we subtracted the population from within the circle from the total population, and what we were left with was smaller than the total population within the circle. Which means that the map was true. I was shocked. There was no way that I thought this was true. What was interesting to me was the process we went through to determine that this map was even true. We had to detrmine the area we were working with and then research the information to get a solution. I think you learn a lot just by this simple picture. This map happened to be true however there are many picture listed under this map that are untrue that we are faced with all the time, that if we took the time to research we woudl realize are silly pictures. Just by researching information about a picutre like this can teach us a lot about a place. 

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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:25 PM

After analyzing this map and looking at the busiest cities and countries in the world I believe this statement to be true. China a giant and very populated country, India is also within the top ten and so is Japan. Once all these have been looked at you can clearly tell that this area of the world is easily the most populated. Many of the other countries and nations have large swaths of land that are very lightly populated. This is a robust area of the world and in some cases the most expansive.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:33 PM
It surprises me how many people live in just that one circle! it is hard to believe or probably explain to someone that with all the other space in the world, that the circles region has more people in it than what is not circled. Although, it could be validated by more reliable or more sources, because with the world that we live in now, numbers can easily be forged. I do believe though that 51% of the world's population does live here.
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:58 PM

This is perhaps the most intriguing map I've been able to analyze. Could it be possible that more people live in that circle than out of it? The world is HUGE and to think the majority of the population resides here, is truly incredible. India, has a huge population living in there for such a small area. Currently, India has over 1 billion people living there making it the second most populous country before China with 1.3 billion. China has a bigger surface area than India and it is interesting to know how these areas compare. The important issue with India is the fact that, with so many people, there is a lack of housing and sanitation unavailable to provide to so many people. The facts are giving that India suffers from overpopulation, clearly, this image has to be true.

Rescooped by Courtney Burns from Geography Education
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Soda vs. Pop with Twitter

Soda vs. Pop with Twitter | Georgraphy World News | Scoop.it
One of the great things about Twitter is that it’s a global conversation anyone can join anytime. Eavesdropping on the world, what what!

 

While many educators have been using http://popvssoda.com/ to show the linguistic regions in the United States, this is a similar map, with the added social media component.  To map out these regions, the cartographer used the word choice on geo-tagged tweets as the data source.  For another twitter, map, the following link shows which regions are most actively engaged on Twitter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/top-countries-on-twitter_n_1653915.html

What do these regions show us?  What types of regions are these?


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Burns's insight:
Twitter is something that is becoming widely used, and is something I usually check everyday. I never really thought of twitter beyond advertising and communicating. It is amazing the kind of data that can be extracted from peoples tweets. In the soda vs. pop argument I would say soda which makes sense since the data shows that people in the Northeast refer to it as soda. Twitter is so current that you can actually get some current and accurate data just from reading the hash tags in peoples tweets. It's amazing that such information can be extracted from all around the world.
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Chris W's comment, August 27, 2012 11:02 AM
This is a really cool use of twitter! I use the term soda, which most of the northeast uses as well.