Georgraphy World ...
Follow
Find tag "physical"
41 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Courtney Burns from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Burns's insight:

Every time you look at a Naturall Disaster you most likely see the end result. You see the before and after pictures. What you don't usually see is the process. Watching this video really puts it into persepective just how fast these things occur. It was literally 5-6 minutes before the once calm area was beginning to get flooded with water. It was amazing how much damage the tsunami caused and how quickly it caused it. I couln't imagine sitting up on a rooftop watching my home be destroyed before my own eyes. Fortunately for the people of Japan they were able to find high enough ground to avoid getting killed by the Tsunami, but the same couldn't be said for their city. It really is so shocking. It started off with just a bell warning and calm waters. Then minutes later the water was rushing in faster and faster causing more and more damage. Then in the same video we see it slow down again. Within 25 miunutes the storm came destroyed families homes and then was gone again. You always see the after math of what happenes during such a disater, but you never see the process in which it happens. Many people of Japan witnessed their city destroyed in front of them, and it was all within 25 minutes. It is truly mind blowing that something like this occurs in such a short period of time and causes so much damage. 

more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 11:05 AM

This shocking video makes me so glad I live where I live, granted we have blizzards but I would definitely take the snow any day over a tsunami or a hurricane. In this video it was like a bad car accident I waanted to stare at the horrific site oof mother nature taking her course but that was just it it was too scary! Can't believe this is normal for some people in the regions that they choose to live in.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 4:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Rescooped by Courtney Burns from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Georgraphy World News | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Burns's insight:

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

more...
Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:57 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:59 AM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 8:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
Rescooped by Courtney Burns from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can We Save Venice?

Can We Save Venice? | Georgraphy World News | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Burns's insight:

It is no surprise to anyone that one day the beautiful city of Venice will one day be completely submerged under water. However looking at this map makes it hopeful that the process may be slowed down or even stopped! Looking at the map the green boxes represent the parts of Venice that have been uplifted, while the red boxes represent the parts that are sinking. What was surprising was that there appeared to be more green boxes on the map than red. Most of the boxes, both green and red, are along the coastline. I would think since most of the damage is along the coast line it would be a little easier to try and uplift. Hopefully the green boxes can make up for the red boxes in order to keep Venice from continually sinking. With these advances who knows where we will be in even another twenty years. We may be able to continue to uplift Venice to prevent it from submerging under water. It appears that the city is making progress in this process from the data given in the map. 

more...
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, September 29, 2013 12:04 AM

It is interesting to know that Venice is sure to sink but not anytime close to our lifetime. Our children may see a very different Venice because of Structural errosian. There should be more preicse research done as some researchers believe that the complete destruction will happen sooner than later. one of the finding says that Venice is siking 7.8 inches every one hundred years. and another finding says that it will be gone within one generation. I think that it is important to visit nenice sooner than later because we really do not know whats going to happen. I beleive that restoration should be high on the list for preserevation of this beautiful water filled city. I want to be able to enjoy a romantic evening with my wife there.

 

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:42 AM

This detailed account of the problems faced by the people, and city, of Venice is a great account of the idea of Human Environment Interaction that is central to Human Geography. Human actions are causing the city to sink while more human actions are attempting to raise the city out of the water.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:53 AM

As we all know Venice is known for its lack of streets because the city is navigated by canals. This map shows where humans are actually causing the city to sink (in red) and where through restoration and consideration are helping the city stay afloat (Green). These little acts of restoration can become increasinly important in the future with growing population density. Lets hope that Venice doesnt get to populated though so the next generation dosent have to refer to it as the lost underwater city of venice.

Rescooped by Courtney Burns from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Earth Structural Layer Cake

Earth Structural Layer Cake | Georgraphy World News | Scoop.it

"One of their lessons [in a series involving geologic sciences] involved teaching the kids about the structure of the Earth. One of her friends came up with the idea of presenting a model of the Earth made out of cake. So my sister asked me if I could make a spherical cake with all the layers of the Earth inside it."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Burns's insight:

I think that this came out awesome! I definetly don't think that I would be able to pull something like this off. However what I found intersting about this was that it was like a cake map. Students were able to get a visual about what the earth's core is like. It visually shows them all the different layers of the earth. Just by visually seeing the cake like this will help a lot more kids to remember this lesson. Also by the baker putting the countries in their accurate locations makes this cake even that much better. They are veiwing a map and they don't even know it. I think this cake is a great tool to use to show students just how the earth is actually made up. By allowing the students to visually see it also makes it more likely for them to remember the material. Viewing maps can teach so much, which is why I think this "cake map" is an awesome way to teach and get the kids attention!

more...
Maree Whiteley's curator insight, August 17, 2013 6:29 AM

How good is this?...and the recipe is included for you to have a go!

Joanne Wegener's curator insight, August 26, 2013 4:42 AM

For all of those super-keen cooks out there ... what a cool idea!

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's comment, September 1, 2013 7:30 PM
Year 8 Unit 1