Georgraphy World ...
Follow
Find tag "EastAsia"
40 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Courtney Burns from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Burns's insight:

Every time you look at a Naturall Disaster you most likely see the end result. You see the before and after pictures. What you don't usually see is the process. Watching this video really puts it into persepective just how fast these things occur. It was literally 5-6 minutes before the once calm area was beginning to get flooded with water. It was amazing how much damage the tsunami caused and how quickly it caused it. I couln't imagine sitting up on a rooftop watching my home be destroyed before my own eyes. Fortunately for the people of Japan they were able to find high enough ground to avoid getting killed by the Tsunami, but the same couldn't be said for their city. It really is so shocking. It started off with just a bell warning and calm waters. Then minutes later the water was rushing in faster and faster causing more and more damage. Then in the same video we see it slow down again. Within 25 miunutes the storm came destroyed families homes and then was gone again. You always see the after math of what happenes during such a disater, but you never see the process in which it happens. Many people of Japan witnessed their city destroyed in front of them, and it was all within 25 minutes. It is truly mind blowing that something like this occurs in such a short period of time and causes so much damage. 

more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:05 PM

This shocking video makes me so glad I live where I live, granted we have blizzards but I would definitely take the snow any day over a tsunami or a hurricane. In this video it was like a bad car accident I waanted to stare at the horrific site oof mother nature taking her course but that was just it it was too scary! Can't believe this is normal for some people in the regions that they choose to live in.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Rescooped by Courtney Burns from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Georgraphy World News | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Burns's insight:

These apartments are so small! Hong Kong is a very widely populated area, but I never would have imagined that people would live in apartments like these. Some of the apartments didn't even have windows. In comparison to apartments in the U.S that room isn't big enough for one person never mind a group of people. I can understand trying to utilize space, but health wise it can't be the best situation for three people to live in such a tight space. Personally I think that I would feel a little claustrophobic living in an apartment like that. I would be interested to see what age range lives in these type of apartments, whether it's students, families, or etc. From reading the article is appears that these apartments are not cheap either! 

more...
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 5:55 PM

With Hong Kong being one of the most densely populated areas in the world, it is no surprise that living quarters are tight with not much space to move. In the photos shown, apartments were so small that they could only be photographed from the ceiling. There is no place to relax and residents are lucky to have whatever they can fit besides their beds. Families with children have to have bunk-beds in order to accommodate. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 5:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 11:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

Rescooped by Courtney Burns from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Georgraphy World News | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


Via Seth Dixon
Courtney Burns's insight:

When we first looked at this picture in class there was no way that I thought this map could be true. We are warned all the time to be careful what we look at on the internet, because for the most part a lot of the information is not true. When we looked at this photo in class we zoomed in on the area in the circle and first determined what was included  in that circle. Once we were able to detrmine what cities were within that circle we were then able to look up the population in each of those cities. We added up the total of each city to get the total population of the places within the circle. Then we researched the total population of the world. Once we were able to find this we subtracted the population from within the circle from the total population, and what we were left with was smaller than the total population within the circle. Which means that the map was true. I was shocked. There was no way that I thought this was true. What was interesting to me was the process we went through to determine that this map was even true. We had to detrmine the area we were working with and then research the information to get a solution. I think you learn a lot just by this simple picture. This map happened to be true however there are many picture listed under this map that are untrue that we are faced with all the time, that if we took the time to research we woudl realize are silly pictures. Just by researching information about a picutre like this can teach us a lot about a place. 

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 14, 2013 4:19 PM

I present this map (hi-res) without any context to my students and ask the question: is this statement true?  How can we ascertain the truthfulness of this claim?  What fact would we need to gather?  This exercise sharpens their critical thinking skills and harnesses the assorted bits of regional information that they already have, and helps them evaluate the statement.

The answers to these questions can be found here.

 

Tags: density, social media, East Asia, South Asia.

lalita pradeep's curator insight, May 14, 2013 10:34 PM

wow....lovely map.........

Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, May 15, 2013 4:52 AM

It's quite amazing!