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The Middle East’s Surprising Appetite for Oil

The Middle East’s Surprising Appetite for Oil | Georgaphy of Southwestern Asia | Scoop.it
CFR experts examine the science and foreign policy surrounding climate change, energy, and nuclear security.

Via Seth Dixon, Kellie Beaumont
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Seth Dixon's comment, December 12, 2012 3:07 PM
In essence, this is measuring "how many miles per gallon" your economy is getting.
geofoodgraz's curator insight, December 15, 2012 4:37 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

"Most everyone knows about the importance of Middle Eastern oil to the global economy and how that impacts geopolitics.  What isn't well-known is that the Middle East's own demand for oil has been increasing as their wealth and standard of living has been rising.  This chart does not show the amount of oil consumption, but the "energy intensity."  This is the amount of energy (often oil) used to produce a unit of GDP for a country's economy.  

 

Questions to Ponder: How will this change oil-producing countries economic development in the future?  How does this make us re-assess these economies?  Does this impact how we think about climate change issues?"

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 1:49 PM

Many people are well-aware of the Middle East's important part in the world oil market, but many fail to realize that this region consumes more oil than any other. Government subsidized oil prices combined with a rising economy spurring increased population growth and development makes parts of this region thirsty for petroleum. Cars are becoming more popular and as areas develop, electricity is being produced by the direct burning of fossil fuels. Meanwhile, countries like Saudi Arabia continue producing massive amounts of oil. This natural resource is what is going to shape this region in the upcoming years, providing major economic development that may trickle down to the people. 

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The Middle East’s Surprising Appetite for Oil

The Middle East’s Surprising Appetite for Oil | Georgaphy of Southwestern Asia | Scoop.it
CFR experts examine the science and foreign policy surrounding climate change, energy, and nuclear security.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, December 12, 2012 3:07 PM
In essence, this is measuring "how many miles per gallon" your economy is getting.
geofoodgraz's curator insight, December 15, 2012 4:37 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

"Most everyone knows about the importance of Middle Eastern oil to the global economy and how that impacts geopolitics.  What isn't well-known is that the Middle East's own demand for oil has been increasing as their wealth and standard of living has been rising.  This chart does not show the amount of oil consumption, but the "energy intensity."  This is the amount of energy (often oil) used to produce a unit of GDP for a country's economy.  

 

Questions to Ponder: How will this change oil-producing countries economic development in the future?  How does this make us re-assess these economies?  Does this impact how we think about climate change issues?"

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 1:49 PM

Many people are well-aware of the Middle East's important part in the world oil market, but many fail to realize that this region consumes more oil than any other. Government subsidized oil prices combined with a rising economy spurring increased population growth and development makes parts of this region thirsty for petroleum. Cars are becoming more popular and as areas develop, electricity is being produced by the direct burning of fossil fuels. Meanwhile, countries like Saudi Arabia continue producing massive amounts of oil. This natural resource is what is going to shape this region in the upcoming years, providing major economic development that may trickle down to the people. 

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NASA finds parts of Middle East have seen alarming rate of water loss in 7 years

NASA finds parts of Middle East have seen alarming rate of water loss in 7 years | Georgaphy of Southwestern Asia | Scoop.it
An amount of freshwater almost the size of the Dead Sea has been lost in parts of the Middle East due to poor management, increased demands for groundwater and the effects of a 2007 drought, acc...

Via Sylvain Rotillon
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Vietnamese guards brave attack to reverse destruction of the forest

Vietnamese guards brave attack to reverse destruction of the forest | Georgaphy of Southwestern Asia | Scoop.it

Vietnam's remote forests have finally come to the attention of ecologists, but efforts to protect wildlife and people risky being stymied by the habits and hardship of poachers and loggers


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All Points East's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:54 PM

Forest conservation in Vietnam

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It's 2012--It's Just Absurd That We're Still Addicted To Middle-Eastern Oil

It's 2012--It's Just Absurd That We're Still Addicted To Middle-Eastern Oil | Georgaphy of Southwestern Asia | Scoop.it
In case you missed it, Iran just vowed to close the Strait of Hormuz if the world imposes tighter sanctions on its authoritarian regime.
Why does that matter?
Because one-sixth of the world's oil supply passes through the Strait of Hormuz.
If Iran actually did close the Strait of Hormuz, it would send the price of oil skyrocketing and clobber the world economy. It would also possibly, lead to war.
Is Iran just blowing hot air? Probably. But the fact that Iran can even threaten to close the Strait of Hormuz is annoying enough.

______________________________________

So, to reiterate:

 

We're highly dependent on a finite fuel source controlled by crazy people who hate us

 

We've done next to nothing about this problem for four decades

 

In some places, this inaction on our part would be referred to as insanity. Or at least gross stupidity.
In other places, it would just be called denial.
But better late than never.


If we focus on trying to wean ourselves from dependence on oil, we can do it.


No, it won't be easy--kicking an addiction never is. Yes, it might lead to some people eventually switching jobs or being slightly less fantastically wealthy (oil industry executives). And, yes, it will require some lifestyle and philosophical changes (ditto). But some of those changes will eventually be positive, not negative.


And, done intelligently, kicking our Middle Eastern oil addiction will also lead to the development of vast, exciting new jobs, companies, and industries--industries that we own and control and that will ultimately employ and enrich millions of Americans.

 


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NASA: Alarming water loss in Middle East

The study, to be published Friday in Water Resources Research, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, examined data over seven years from 2003 from a pair of gravity-measuring satellites which is part of NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate...

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Southeast Asia wasting too much food

Southeast Asia wasting too much food | Georgaphy of Southwestern Asia | Scoop.it

BANGKOK, 9 October 2012 (IRIN) - Food losses in Asia due to disasters or poor storage, packing and delivery are set to worsen, and governments are ill-prepared to stem the wastage, according experts recently convened by the Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies in Singapore.


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Huge paper company promises to stop being deforesting jerks

Huge paper company promises to stop being deforesting jerks | Georgaphy of Southwestern Asia | Scoop.it

Under pressure from activists, the world's third-largest paper pulper has agreed to stop clear-cutting natural rainforest in Indonesia.


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All Points East's curator insight, February 6, 2013 8:38 PM

Good news for Sumatran and Borneo forests