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The Problem With Megacities

The Problem With Megacities | Geomatic | Scoop.it
Megacities in developing countries should be seen for what they are: a tragic replaying of the worst aspects of the mass urbanization that occurred previously in the West.

Via dilaycock
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Urbanisation and sustainable mobility in India

Urbanisation and sustainable mobility in India | Geomatic | Scoop.it
As India's population rapidly increases, the need for sustainable urban development and transport must be addressed. Efficiency, cost and employment will all be key factors in this change.

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For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill

For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill | Geomatic | Scoop.it
Methane from a landfill will flow to a power plant, helping to keep the lights on in the city.

 

When Mexico City’s government shut down the giant Bordo Poniente landfill last December, officials announced that they had a full-blown plan for the site...the city aims to capture the methane gas produced by the landfill to fuel a power plant that could supply electricity to as many as 35,000 homes. 


Via Seth Dixon, dilaycock
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James Hobson's curator insight, September 28, 2014 9:41 PM

(Central America topic 8)

This article bears striking resemblance to the situation unfolding just a few blocks from my home: Johnston's Central Landfill.

The main similarity is with the use of methane gas for electricity production. Not only is this  a 'green' form of energy (natural decomposition), but it helps to prevent the foul odor of methane gas from spreading to nearby cities and towns. Before upgrading methane pumps at the Central Landfill, my neighborhood smelled like a dumpster most days. Now the air is cleaner and clean electricity is being produced... "two birds, one stone." Hopefully other landfills will take these examples to meaning in some way.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 4:20 PM

Usually when a landfill becomes overloaded, it just gets shut down and left to rot. Mexico City is trying to do something new and ingenious with its massive landfill. Instead of closing off the land and letting it stay as reusable space, Mexico is hoping to develop a way to harness landfill gases in order to make electricity. If it is successful, it could prove to be a world-changing solution for other large, developing cities. It has the potential of lowering energy costs, creating jobs, and finding a purpose for land that would otherwise remain unusable for probably centuries. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:58 AM

In class we discussed the numerous environmental issues that exist in Mexico City. This is a great way of turning a negative into a positive. On a larger scale, I think this is going to be the kind of solutions that every country will have to eventually find. Creative ways of using technology to turn harmful waste into energy is a great idea. Methane is a cleaner than coal and recycling lessens the burden on natural resources.

Rescooped by gemtice from Geography in the classroom
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Megacities @ National Geographic Magazine

Megacities @ National Geographic Magazine | Geomatic | Scoop.it

By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India.


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For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill

For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill | Geomatic | Scoop.it
Methane from a landfill will flow to a power plant, helping to keep the lights on in the city.

 

When Mexico City’s government shut down the giant Bordo Poniente landfill last December, officials announced that they had a full-blown plan for the site...the city aims to capture the methane gas produced by the landfill to fuel a power plant that could supply electricity to as many as 35,000 homes. 


Via Seth Dixon, dilaycock
more...
James Hobson's curator insight, September 28, 2014 9:41 PM

(Central America topic 8)

This article bears striking resemblance to the situation unfolding just a few blocks from my home: Johnston's Central Landfill.

The main similarity is with the use of methane gas for electricity production. Not only is this  a 'green' form of energy (natural decomposition), but it helps to prevent the foul odor of methane gas from spreading to nearby cities and towns. Before upgrading methane pumps at the Central Landfill, my neighborhood smelled like a dumpster most days. Now the air is cleaner and clean electricity is being produced... "two birds, one stone." Hopefully other landfills will take these examples to meaning in some way.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 4:20 PM

Usually when a landfill becomes overloaded, it just gets shut down and left to rot. Mexico City is trying to do something new and ingenious with its massive landfill. Instead of closing off the land and letting it stay as reusable space, Mexico is hoping to develop a way to harness landfill gases in order to make electricity. If it is successful, it could prove to be a world-changing solution for other large, developing cities. It has the potential of lowering energy costs, creating jobs, and finding a purpose for land that would otherwise remain unusable for probably centuries. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:58 AM

In class we discussed the numerous environmental issues that exist in Mexico City. This is a great way of turning a negative into a positive. On a larger scale, I think this is going to be the kind of solutions that every country will have to eventually find. Creative ways of using technology to turn harmful waste into energy is a great idea. Methane is a cleaner than coal and recycling lessens the burden on natural resources.