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Rescooped by gemtice from Geography in the classroom
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For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill

For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill | Geomatic | Scoop.it
Methane from a landfill will flow to a power plant, helping to keep the lights on in the city.

 

When Mexico City’s government shut down the giant Bordo Poniente landfill last December, officials announced that they had a full-blown plan for the site...the city aims to capture the methane gas produced by the landfill to fuel a power plant that could supply electricity to as many as 35,000 homes. 


Via Seth Dixon, dilaycock
more...
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 20, 3:47 PM

I think it's great that Mexico City is leading by example and reusing the landfill. The article discussing how the United States has had plans of figuring out what to do with the gases that come from landfills but nothing ever actually happens. The U.S just keeps rebuilding more landfill cells. The methane gas produced by the landfill is going to fuel a power plant that could supply elecricity to about 35,000 homes.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 23, 10:06 PM

I believe this is an environmental innovation. If a country such as Mexico with staggering amounts of methane from landfills ,can orchestrate this plan there is hope for the world. This plan seems to be well thought out and as long as it is used in the correct way and only offers positive results ,I do not see why this could not work. It is our duty as humans and creators of this waste to find a way to reduce it's harmful impact on the environment.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 28, 9:41 PM

(Central America topic 8)

This article bears striking resemblance to the situation unfolding just a few blocks from my home: Johnston's Central Landfill.

The main similarity is with the use of methane gas for electricity production. Not only is this  a 'green' form of energy (natural decomposition), but it helps to prevent the foul odor of methane gas from spreading to nearby cities and towns. Before upgrading methane pumps at the Central Landfill, my neighborhood smelled like a dumpster most days. Now the air is cleaner and clean electricity is being produced... "two birds, one stone." Hopefully other landfills will take these examples to meaning in some way.

Rescooped by gemtice from Geography in the classroom
Scoop.it!

For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill

For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill | Geomatic | Scoop.it
Methane from a landfill will flow to a power plant, helping to keep the lights on in the city.

 

When Mexico City’s government shut down the giant Bordo Poniente landfill last December, officials announced that they had a full-blown plan for the site...the city aims to capture the methane gas produced by the landfill to fuel a power plant that could supply electricity to as many as 35,000 homes. 


Via Seth Dixon, dilaycock
more...
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 20, 3:47 PM

I think it's great that Mexico City is leading by example and reusing the landfill. The article discussing how the United States has had plans of figuring out what to do with the gases that come from landfills but nothing ever actually happens. The U.S just keeps rebuilding more landfill cells. The methane gas produced by the landfill is going to fuel a power plant that could supply elecricity to about 35,000 homes.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 23, 10:06 PM

I believe this is an environmental innovation. If a country such as Mexico with staggering amounts of methane from landfills ,can orchestrate this plan there is hope for the world. This plan seems to be well thought out and as long as it is used in the correct way and only offers positive results ,I do not see why this could not work. It is our duty as humans and creators of this waste to find a way to reduce it's harmful impact on the environment.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 28, 9:41 PM

(Central America topic 8)

This article bears striking resemblance to the situation unfolding just a few blocks from my home: Johnston's Central Landfill.

The main similarity is with the use of methane gas for electricity production. Not only is this  a 'green' form of energy (natural decomposition), but it helps to prevent the foul odor of methane gas from spreading to nearby cities and towns. Before upgrading methane pumps at the Central Landfill, my neighborhood smelled like a dumpster most days. Now the air is cleaner and clean electricity is being produced... "two birds, one stone." Hopefully other landfills will take these examples to meaning in some way.