The Geography Classroom
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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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Dangerous global warming could be reversed, say scientists

Dangerous global warming could be reversed, say scientists | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
A combination of burning trees for energy and capturing and storing carbon dioxide could offset and even reverse emissions.
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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

Altaira Wallquist's curator insight, March 18, 2015 4:47 PM

This article goes in depth to define and describe globalization.  It discusses globalization  through an economical, political, and cultural standpoint.

 

This connects to Unit 1 in that it discusses globalization and things from a global perspective. It all discusses the society we live in today.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:18 PM

globalization

This video describes and really breaks down globalization. The video talks about how some countries benefit and some countries don't benefit from globalization. The video also separates globalization into three parts: economic, politics, and culture. It goes over the huge role that technology plays in globalization and covers it well.

This relates to our unit, because globalization is a huge factor in human geography as a whole. It is one of the main factors why our cultures are beginning to intertwine and have things in common.     

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Making Sense of Maps

TED Talks Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city -- less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places.

 

This video touches on numerous themes that are crucial to geographers including: 1) how our minds arrange spatial information, 2) how to best graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your audience and 3) how mapping a place can be the impetus for changing outdated systems. This is the story of how a cartographer working to improve a local transportation system map, which in turn, started city projects to improve the infrastructure and public utilities in Dublin, Ireland. This cartographer argues that the best map design for a transport system needs to conform to how on cognitive mental mapping works more so than geographic accuracy (like so many subway maps do).

 

Tags: transportation, urban, mapping, cartography, planning, TED, video, unit 7 cities.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:42 PM
When trying to graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your particular audience, you will have a lot to take into consideration. How familiar are the travelers with the area you map out? Are there visuals to precisely mark on the map so that will they accurately correspond to the area?
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Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

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fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 9:00 AM
que lindo
oyndrila's curator insight, June 3, 2013 1:35 PM

Useful and interesting visuals. They help us to understand significant aspects like varying population density, variable intensity of use of social media, digital divide etc.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 10, 2013 8:12 AM

Communication and social media. 

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Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes.


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Utiya Chusna Sitapraptiwi's curator insight, July 15, 2013 5:44 AM

Easy to find a picture of the city in the world. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:45 PM

I have been using Google Earth to check out a few different areas that I have and have not been to, particularly Washington D.C./Maryland, which I visited last month for the first time.  I thought it was truly awesome and loved all the subtle differences as well as the larger and more obvious differences from RI.  This Observatory is pretty interesting, and doesn't limit your observations to strictly visual perceptions, unlike most Astrological Observatories.  It is a compendium of knowledge, information, and facts that define and characterize, categorize and redefine areas of the world.  This seems like something out of Minority Report or Deja Vu (two really good sci-fi movies with visual observation technology that looks through time), both because of its appearance, and because of its general function.  It also reminds me of some stuff that I've seen in the 1967 "The Prisoner" series, which really blew my mind about sociological portayals of the occasionally subversive human condition from entirely oppressing parties and circumstances.  Hopefully this information will, as comes with great power, be treated with great responsibility... For all our sakes.

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:05 PM

Nice. I'm going to try it.

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Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America?

Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America? | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

There is a pretty ridiculous North-South split, although Maryland, northern Virginia, and southern Florida (which is pretty much the North anyways) fall into pancake territory, while Waffle House has made inroads into Ohio and Indiana.


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Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, January 9, 2014 11:35 PM

This article basically shows that South prefer waffles than pancakes. Although, there's very small part of Texas that prefers waffles over pancakes. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 1:13 PM

This map shows how divided north and south are in terms of Pancakes and waffles, with Pancakes having a larger reach than waffles, and showing how regional differences are effected by something as odd as fast food.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 10:05 PM

I have never been to a Waffle House and I hate IHOP. I chose this article because the map popped out at me. It was like an IHOP take over with a poor Waffle House in the middle. However, it is interesting to see that when you open the article, the IHOP density comes out to  1,543, while Waffle House density comes out to 1,661. By looking at this map, you would think that IHOP would have the bigger density. Waffle House gets most of its business from states in the South, while IHOP seems to be all over the place, Northern and Southern states.

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137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art

137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
The Bay Area's Jenny Odell creates maddeningly complex sets of similar structures, like stadiums, nuclear plants and cargo ships.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 10, 2013 10:57 PM

I love geographically inspired art.  How many of the 137 icon features (as portrayed in Google Maps but removed from their context) can you identify?  For a higher-resolution, image and more of her art, click here


Tags: mapping, art, google, trivia.

Sean de Basti's curator insight, August 27, 2013 10:31 AM

do you know where everything is located?

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 1:04 AM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography

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Choices Program Presentation

What Does Good GeographyTeaching Look Like? Answering the Big Questions in Geography.


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Zhanat Shanbatyrova's comment, June 28, 2013 6:11 AM
Thanks a lot for the valuable information!
Jorge Joo Nagata's curator insight, June 28, 2013 11:26 AM

Me encantó la presentación... dice tantas cosas de una disciplina tan querida (e importante) para mi y que debe tener una relevancia primordial ahora más que nunca.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, June 28, 2013 3:07 PM
It came from Seth.. take a look at his pages. Awesome things.
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One-minute World News

One-minute World News | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Watch the latest news summary from BBC World News. International news updated 24 hours a day.

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Asia will Drown, Africa will Starve in 30 years: World Bank Report on Global Warming

Asia will Drown, Africa will Starve  in 30 years:  World Bank Report on Global Warming | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Juan Cole | Energy, Environment, Uncategorized (Climate Change >> Asia will Drown, Africa will Starve in 30 years: World Bank Report on Global Warming http://t.co/AWLIlNdPTe)...
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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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GIS demonstrates links between health and location

GIS demonstrates links between health and location | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
The neighborhoods in which children and adolescents live and spend their time play a role in whether or not they eat a healthy diet, get enough exercise or become obese, concludes a collection of studies in a special theme issue of the American...

 

Spatial analysis shows that numerous disciplines can utilize the 'geographic advantage' to improve research. 


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Why Scale is Important

Discover why and how scale matters in geography education, with real-world examples using fieldwork, GIS, and much more. This video introduces the topic and ...

 

This is a sample Youtube clip from the 'geographyuberalles' channel which has over 800 videos produced by @josephkerski (NCGE president, Educational Manager at ESRI).  This is a great resource. 


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 7:39 PM

Unit 1

 

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 9:06 PM

This video expresses how important scale is and how different scales effect each other. Climate and the weather and effected by scales, you must know what the scale they are talking about is in order to know how precise the weather is. 

 

It talks about absolute and relative scale, and how they affect each other. It also discusses how a large scale a smaller size of land is than a small scale. The whole world would be a small scale map, whereas a city would be a large scale. 

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What If the Entire World Lived in 1 City?

What If the Entire World Lived in 1 City? | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

Two Yale architects pose the question in an ambitious research project.

 

"Hsiang and Mendis have increasingly come to believe that the only way to study and plan for our urban planet is to conceptualize its entire population in one seamless landscape – to picture 7 billion of us as if we all lived in a single, massive city."


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:54 PM

I was very exited by the work being done by Bimal Mendis and Joyce Hsiang.  I hear to much on the news and in conversation about over population, energy shortages and brutal living conditions.  Creating a digital interactive medium is the most efficient way to educate the internet consuming public about issues and developments all over the world.  It reminds me of the blue marble picture taken from Apollo 17, the first full color image of our planet.  This image is considered to be the defining moment that awoke the conservation movement and understanding that the earth is our home and should be treated as such.  I cant help hoping a program like “the city of seven billion” will help people to relies we are all one species and from that develop a move beneficial way of coexisting.

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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 6:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

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Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World

Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Adapted from the book by Professor Susan Hanson...

 

This is an excellent review/summary of an edited volume that shows the value of geographic thought and its importance in the modern world.  This review conveniently gives a one paragraph synopsis of each chapter.  It does not need to be read chronologically, so you can pick and choose what you find relevant to your course.  The top 10 are (in order of inclusion in the book): the Idea of the Map, the Weather Map, GIS, Human Adjustment, Water Budget Climatology, Human Transformation of the Earth, Spatial Organization and Interdependence, Central Place Theory, Megalopolis and Sense of Place. 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 29, 2013 9:40 AM

This is an excellent review/summary of an edited volume that shows the value of geographic thought and its importance in the modern world.  This review conveniently gives a one paragraph synopsis of each chapter.  It does not need to be read chronologically, so you can pick and choose what you find relevant to your course.  The top 10 are (in order of inclusion in the book): the Idea of the Map, the Weather Map, GIS, Human Adjustment, Water Budget Climatology, Human Transformation of the Earth, Spatial Organization and Interdependence, Central Place Theory, Megalopolis and Sense of Place.

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 5:24 PM

Summary: This article demonstrated how geographic concepts have been able to change daily life for humans everywhere. It talked about the log term effect of many life changing geographic concepts, such as how maps have influenced weather forecasts which have become an important part of daily life.

 

Insight:  This article showed me how important geographic processes can be on daily life.  It also demonstrates that nearly everyone in a developed country today relies on their ability to read geographic information even in something as simple as a weather map.

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Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS

Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

"GIS has given us the chance to re-examine how the Civil War battle was won and lost." 


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Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 2014 10:34 PM

I really like this interactive map application.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 28, 2014 1:13 PM

unit 1

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 3:14 PM

Just another of the millions of uses for GIS...

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What will you do?

What will you do? | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 2013 9:02 PM

The world is in the palm of your hand; what will you do?  This is a question that each generation collectively needs to ask itself.  We can consider ourselves stewards of this planet with its vast natural resources and abundant potential.  If we make choices that are sustainable for the future we will keep many of these amazing possibilities open to future generations.  (For Hi-res image click here).  Just one more reason to read Geography Education.  


Tags: resources, sustainability.

Hoàng Phương's comment, July 8, 2013 5:22 AM
My hand make all thing.
Susana Negrin's comment, July 8, 2013 1:17 PM
Excelente estrategia para visitar el blog que es muy interesante!!
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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:48 AM

It's fascinating to look at the effects of globalization, and a great look at how economies change.  When people in the Western world drop a bag of clothes off at a charity, I doubt we think they'd end up in a village in Africa. Warning:  it does get a little preachy at the end. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.

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UN projects world population will hit 9.6 billion by 2050

UN projects world population will hit 9.6 billion by 2050 | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Population growth is projected to be highest in Africa, while UN projects world population will top out at 9.6 billion in 2050.

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China's reliance on coal reduces life expectancy by 5.5 years, says study

China's reliance on coal reduces life expectancy by 5.5 years, says study | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

........"Linking the Chinese pollution data to mortality statistics from 1991 to 2000, the researchers found a sharp difference in mortality rates on either side of the border formed by the Huai River. They also found the variation to be attributable to cardiorespiratory illness, and not to other causes of death."

 

High levels of air pollution in northern China – much of it caused by an over-reliance on burning coal for heat – will cause 500 million people to lose an aggregate 2.5 billion years from their lives, the authors predict in the study, published in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:44 PM

We talked in class about how certain poor working conditions or pollution emissions are permissible in countries whose laws allow for such situations, and how countries like the US arrange for certain work to be done in those countries.  This 'work' stuff all centers around an ever-necessary "profit" that exists as a carrot being dangled in front of a horse as it runs all of its life, blinded to everything else.  It is almost cartoonish, that for a percentage increase in profit due to minimalized expenses, a moral businessman might yield and give in to the temptation of exposing workers to dangerous conditions... or that all businesses might do the same thing... It is socially dangerous; a hazard like bullying, or cheating, using others as human shields to collect the damage while someone else collects the benefits.  I don't think that any life form should be exposed to such unfairness, because it just does not resonate with my philosophical consciousness that any individual should have a better life than another (or worse).  And why make it worse for someone?  Why pollute their areas?  Why steal their natural resources?  Why... Capitalism at all?  I do not think greed is innate to human nature, because selflessness does occur, and is often leaned towards in conventional modern morality/ethics.  I think that the vicious cycle that capitalism puts us in causes us to self-servingly run around like angry rats trying to feed ourselves, which causes us to take out risks on other people, and polluting other people's living space.  It really is sad, because this planet is alive... there is so much life on this planet, assumedly and debateably from this planet, this planet that we consider our home.  To be killing ourselves by not keeping our home clean and healthy is like a very bad habit- it's like smoking.  And it is taking a toll on the planet, as well as its inhabitants

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 2014 11:20 AM

This article and the accompanying resources describe the damage the pollution problem China has in its cities. China's economic desire to do things as cheaply as possible for the best profit margins has done significant damage to the air and now to its own people. By burning cheap coal to meet energy needs China has created a fairly toxic atmosphere in its Northern cities. The pollution is causing high rates of cardiorespiratory illness and even the government-controlled news can't keep quiet about the issue.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:28 PM

This article explains how China is burning an abundance of coal for heating. The Chinese population is over 1 billion; image the amount of coal that must be burned in order to supply heat for the people of northern China. Unfortunately, the burning coal is polluting the air and causing the Chinese to have lower life expectancies. China, along with other countries should start to find other ways to heat their homes. 

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Demographic Transition Model Song

A song which I wrote to teach students about the key concepts of demographic transitionm, put to a moviemaker. Written by Mr Sims Vocals, keys and guitar: Mr...

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Geography of Aspiration

Geography of Aspiration | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Try to replicate it with development schemes all you want, but you're overlooking what makes New York City—and other places of ambition—so great.

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Dean Haakenson's comment, June 6, 2013 11:30 AM
Very cool.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:31 PM

I think that historical opportunity is what makes NYC so great... well, great as implied by the writers of this article.  Having a good history, it is only natural that it would become something so popular and draw the ambitious to it.  In contrast, a newly formed colony of humans on Mars would be potentially better- because in this hypothetical/planned colony, people would be able to benefit from the fact that they are building from the ground up, from scratch, and with the knowledge of other development schemes/trends that occurred elsewhere.  This could entirely circumvent all ill aspects of society... Sometimes to create, one must first destroy... perhaps NYC should be rebuilt to eliminate problems, before humans move on to other worlds?  I thought NY was a bit of a mess when I drove through with my cousin.  The graffiti was gorgeous, but the filth and traffic were quite triumphant, and it is not a place where my ambition would lead me.  I think true talent will be found, regardless of this subliminal advertisment brought about by the article endorsing NYC as a 'place of ambition.'  Not all of us can go to these 'meccas' of talent... but it doesn't mean we are any less extravagent as life forms.  I would ask if most people would want to make it big in places like that, or if they would rather be happier, elsewhere.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:53 PM

This reminds me of the production method idea you taught us where even though you may be able to produce 2 products better than a third world country it is for the best if you have them do what they excel at while you do your thing. (You made a lebron james reference in class). the reason why im connecting this is because every city has its own thing to offer with San fran being the arts portland with the mom and pop shops and new york with the enterainment. if you can excel at what you do then your city can blossom.

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Analysis Finds 3x More Farmers’ Markets in Areas with the Lowest Obesity Rates

Analysis Finds 3x More Farmers’ Markets in Areas with the Lowest Obesity Rates | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
An independent analysis conducted by mapping analytics firm PetersonGIS shows that locations with the highest obesity rates contain the fewest farmers’ markets.

 

Agricultural production has become a big business, not only in total dollars, but in the scale of production.  In the last 50 years, the rise of 'agribusiness' has dominated the food industry and has redefined how food is produced.  In reaction to this, farmers' markets and organic farming is enjoying success within select demographic groups...and this study shows some of the results of that linkage.


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