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Gendered Differences in Development

Gendered Differences in Development | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

Being a woman can be much more difficult, based on where you live. 

 


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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


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Kyle Toner's comment, September 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Globalization is an overall positive drive. In time globalization needs to mold developing countries who are in need of a better political and economical system
Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 1:16 PM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

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The cultural and environmental impacts of tourism

The cultural and environmental impacts of tourism | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Documentary shows how travelers end up spoiling the very "authenticity" they come looking for.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 12:30 PM

Tourism can have negative environmental and cultural impacts and this interview with the film maker of the documentary "Gringo Trails" is a compelling perspective.   

planwithdan's curator insight, January 9, 7:55 AM

A short interview with Pegi Vail and her thoughts on how tourism helps and harms local communities.

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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 11:15 AM

As jobs become less and less available in the United States, it does not surprise me that the number of migrants from the US to Mexico is growing. Globalization is shifting the job markets for production through North America. That is bolster by NAFTA and because production is cheaper in Mexico for US companies, more jobs in production are popping up. My question is that will we see this happen in the future as Mexico continues to grow, will we see migrations of lower wage workers more south to countries that are cheap for companies. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 18, 11:33 AM

For decades America's large producing companies transferred their industries to Asia where the cost of production was set at a rate no one could refuse. With a demand in markets, companies have decided to migrate their companies to Mexico where they can receive the cheaper labor cost. This in turn has the possibility of reducing air pollution, at the same time also has the possibility of increasing air pollution in Mexico.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 11:44 AM

After US and Canada, Mexico is the next choose and of the three "the easiest one". Mexico has a high rate of poverty, but it also has a lot of opportunities for people who really want to work. Asians love Latin America, specially Mexico.

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Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms

Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

"Feedlots, a new series of images crafted by British artist Mishka Henner, uses publicly available satellite imagery to show the origins of mass-produced meat products."

 

Tags: Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.  


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Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 6:00 PM

Does this motivate you to become #vegetarian? 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:19 AM

Some wild photgraphs about the devastation of mass aggriculture to the enviroment. Also their is a nice little bit about the laws behind why most people havent seen farming conditions till recent, such as some states preventing people to take pictures of their farms or factories without consent. If you are intreged by this article i suggest you watch FOOD Inc. This movie goes into great detail about how our food is made. But caution this may be one instance where igroance is Bliss because once you know exactly how your food is made you may never be able to eat some meats again. This movie can also be found on Netflix.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:35 AM

British artist Mishka Henner took photographs and enhanced the colors of feedlots to reveal the agribusiness of meat production. Photographs of feedlots are considered illegal and the legal repercussions of Mishka Henner are not clear at the moment, but the photographs are shocking and reveal again how little Americans know about their food production. 

Americans have changed the places and utilized them to build agribusiness empires and have introduced new problems to the landscape of feedlot and farming towns.

 

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Climate change may increase violence, study shows

Climate change may increase violence, study shows | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
The risk of violence will go up as climate change warms the planet, scientists say.
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A street by any other name...

A street by any other name... | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
...might be easier to sell. By Chris Partridge.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 22, 2013 8:00 PM

As stated by the Church of Geography: "In Europe during the Middle Ages, cities were often segregated (in part) by occupation. So if you needed baked goods, you'd go to the section of the city in which all the bakers lived. Shoes? Go to the neighborhood where the cobblers lived.

And the street names reflected these occupations: Bakers Lane, Cobbler Lane, and so on. Many of these names continue to exist, reflecting those cities' Medieval pasts.  Prostitution also tended to be found in particular districts and on particular streets. Sure, Bordhawe Lane still exists in some places (Bordhawe apparently means "brothel"). Yet for some reason, the more imaginitive street names have all been replaced. "

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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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Shark Tracker

Shark Tracker | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 16, 2013 10:02 PM

This is a project sponsored by OCEARCH (Ocean Reseach) that helps to track the journeys of individual sharks to better understand their migratory patterns.  This data also helps to establish maps of the spatial extend of Shark habitat.  This is in essence another fantastic practical application of GPS technology.


Tags: biogeographymapping, GPS.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 16, 2013 11:51 PM
its just never safe to get back intot he water is it. guess Im just showing my age with that movie reference. Saw Jaws at the Route 44 Drive in the Rustic full the the metal speaker that hung on your window...so much fun
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The Detroit Bus Company

"Young entrepreneur Andy Didorosi believes that the way to Detroit’s new era depends on better leadership and a solid connection between the city and the suburbs. The city in 2012 axed its plans to build the M-1 light rail, the transit solution that would’ve bridged that vital connection, Didorosi bought a bus, had a local artist trick it out with a wicked mural, and he started the Detroit Bus Company.  Dedicated to a more connected city, Andy Didorosi is bringing Detroit home one ride at a time."


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Jackie Hinton's comment, July 19, 2013 12:18 PM
love the video,didn't know detroit was in that bad of shape.
Betty Denise's comment, July 20, 2013 5:45 AM
http://www.marchandmeffre.com/detroit/index.html (Detroit détruite)
Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:52 PM

Andy is creating a transportation system for the new Detroit.  Once the inevitable downsize takes place his idea for transportation could take off.

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How to Cite GIS Materials

How to Cite GIS Materials | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
When writing a research paper or an article that contains references to GIS data, maps, or other geospatial material, it's important to include a proper citation crediting the author of the GIS work.

 

Citations vary depending on if the map is a single piece of work, part of a map series, an atlas, or a map that is part of a book or a journal article. There are even specific citations if the map was created using GIS software or you are citing GIS data. There are varying citation guidelines for static web maps versus dynamic online mapping applications.

 

For each map, first consult the original work in order to extract the necessary information. Scan the map for the necessary information. If some of the needed citation information is not listed directly on the map, access any available background information. If the map is found within a book, article, or atlas, look for any figures or footnotes that provide additional detail. If the map is accessed from a web page, check for any background information on the source web site. Make sure you carefully note within your citation any missing information.......


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Human Development Trends, 2005

Human Development Trends, 2005 | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Elisha Upton's insight:

A presentation for UNDP Human Development Report 2005 in English and some other languages. Human Development Trends was produced in 2005.

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McDonalds Around the World- Google Image Result for http://www.bme.eu.com/media/media-news/infographics/macdonalds.png

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First World Problems Read By Third World Kids

First World Problems Read By Third World Kids | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
A new ad campaign from charitable organization Water is Life features Haitian children and adults reading the everyday gripes and minor irritations first world citizens post on Twitter with the popular #FirstWorldProblems hashtag.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 18, 2013 11:51 AM

In addition to this video, also look at the "Skeptical Third World Kid" photogallery at the bottom as you think about development and the uneasy cultural issues of power that are connected with it. 


Michaela Schumacher's curator insight, December 20, 2013 11:56 AM

This article talks about culture and the aspect of globlization and how the first world countries are worried about something that is so far beyond what is really need that they forget what means the most. This is a video showing people that we take things for granted just becuase we have everything handed to us. That in the third world countries there is bigger worries that are way more important than not having a charger or things of that kind. It is relevent to me becuase i went to Haiti and saw the third world country with my own eyes and know that every word said on the video and every picture are real and that isn't just a studio createing things but real pictures of a world we would have never thought was there. 

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Redistricting

How can cartography swing an election?  Simple.


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Miroslav Milosavljević's comment, July 27, 2013 5:56 PM
This great video example may serve students for a better understanding the term. Well done!
Dean Haakenson's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:40 AM
Thanks Seth Dixon for Scooping this! And thanks Mr. Burton for rescooping. Great lesson for government and geography.
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:14 AM
this video shows the process from which political candidates win their respective elections. gerrymandering is an illegal use of power in the respect to redistricting and moving town lines in order to pump up voting power. this is an illegal action that happens countless times in elections and taper to higher powers. this gerrymandering idea takes the voter power to elect and puts it into the hands of the actual political personnel. by reshaping you can stack votes into one particular area this way you are guaranteed to win that district. this is where you see districts with these crazy shaped areas rather than nice square or other simple shapes.
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Should we be worried?


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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 21, 2013 4:58 AM
Our current predicament in terms of resource depletion, pollution and climate change is mainly due to the industrialized lifestyle of the minority of the world population. Obviously, that's not a result of overpopulation per se.

However, population growth stops when living standards rise. We can't stabilize at 10 billion unless all 10 billion enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Given that even our current resource use is unsustainable, overpopulation is a real issue.
Hongsheng Li's curator insight, September 22, 2013 11:18 PM

人口资源环境承载力

人口过度 or 消费过度

Blake Welborn's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:49 PM

This fits in well with our population chapter now as this is warning of over population. As the population increases so does need for food, which increases global agriculture and pollution

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, October 26, 11:23 AM

Unit 3

How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?

1. Culture traits

2. Diffusion patters

3.Acculturation, assimilation, and multiculturalism

4. Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth

5. Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 8:26 PM

unit 3

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This Pittsburgh restaurant only serves food from America's "enemies"

This Pittsburgh restaurant only serves food from America's "enemies" | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Conflict Kitchen is the only restaurant in the world that serves cuisine solely from countries with which the U.S. is in conflict.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 3, 2013 4:26 PM

Any Ethnic conflicts here HUGGERS?

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:04 PM

Initially I wasn't really sure what I thought about this resturant. My initial reaction was that I hated it and thought it was a bad idea. I to seemed like we were supporting another country by serving their food. However there is a cultural experience involved when we go out to eat. Many people go out to italian resturants to get the experience of italy and etc. However after really thinking about it the US is typically in conflict with another countries government, not the people who live there. By selling the food of countries we are in conflict with almost gives us an idea about what exactly the culture is there. I think it almost educates people in such a way. I think that might be the purpose on the resturant. By eating at this resturant it opens peoples eyes to what people of that particular country are consuming on a regular day basis. That experience can be good or bad, but either way it still opens up peoples eyes to the type of world other countries are living in. I think by eating there you open yourslef up to a new cultural experience, which I belive is exactly the point that the kitchen is trying to serve. Even if it is through food. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:06 PM

Conflict Kitchen serves foods from the countries the United States is in conflict with. They might be doing this to show Americans a little bit of how their culture is b eating their foods. 

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Peru To Power 2 Million Of Its Poorest by Solar Energy

Peru To Power 2 Million Of Its Poorest by Solar Energy | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

 

July 15, 2013  Peru last week initiated a new program that will provide electricity to more than two million of its poorest residents using solar panels.

 

Energy and Mining Minister Jorge Merino said that the program will allow 95% of Peru to have access to electricity by the end of 2016. Currently, approximately 66% of the population has access to electricity.

 

“This program is aimed at the poorest people, those who lack access to electric lighting and still use oil lamps, spending their own resources to pay for fuels that harm their health,” said Merino.

 

The first phase of the program, called “The National Photovoltaic Household Electrification Program” was initiated on Monday (July 8) in the Contumaza province, where 1,601 solar panels were installed. These installations will power 126 impoverished communities in the districts of Cupisnique, San Benito, Tantarica, Chilete, Yonan, San Luis, and Contai.

The program plans to install about 12,500 solar (photovoltaic) systems to provide for approximately 500,000 households at an overall cost of about $200 million.

 

 Peru is the third-largest country in South America, with a population over 24 million. It has average solar radiation levels which can reach 5 kWh per m2 a day in the Sierra (foothill of The Andes). Peru is also home to the first major PV installation in Latin America.

 

This follows Peru’s public commitments to accelerate renewable energy development, as reported here previously by CleanTechnica.

And also:

 Peru Unveils Plan to Use Solar Panels to Provide Electricity to 2 Million People, Latin American Herald Tribune


  http://cleantechnica.com/2012/05/31/peru-south-american-nations-turn-to-reverse-auctions-to-accelerate-renewable-energy-development/


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 30, 2013 11:39 AM

This is a great idea to show how solar power can make a difference in reducing  our use of fossil fuels and making green energy the wave of the future.

 

During last semester I did a paper on Puru that was fun to do.

jminium courses's curator insight, August 1, 2013 1:37 PM

If only other countries could do something like this....

Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 11:32 AM

A very bold move. Peru definitely is in a good position to utilize Solar Energy well, the question is how much extra it will cost to install electricity into many households in Peru which have none. A big initiative like this will be what it takes for more countries to adopt Solar energy if it works out well. The global warming debate aside, it's still a really empowering notion to have your own energy generated by the sun which can be created in your own backyard.

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10 Expectations

We hear often of the 'high expectations' schools must have of and for their students, yet we seldom hear of the expectations students have of their schools.  Students' expectations constitute the new 'rules of engagement' in the relationship that young people want with their schools."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 22, 2013 12:59 PM

This video, produced by Leaving to Learn is a great reminder to educators to design with the end in mind.  What are the students getting out the experience? 

Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:30 AM

Connecting it to the real world...a teacher's challenge.

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Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations?

Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations? | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

"Can you recognize it by its Starbucks locations?  Let’s find out. This quiz shows all of the Starbucks locations within the city boundaries of 20 domestic or foreign cities, and for each you must name the city depicted from four choices."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 2013 1:19 PM

This is my favorite place-based guessing game since GeoGuessr (5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where).  This isn't about knowing Starbucks locations, but understanding spatial urban economic patterns (just as this article showing the locations where McDonald's and Burger King will place stores also relies of understanding urban economic patterns).  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few.  This is one way to make the urban model more relevant.       


Tags: urbanmodels, economic, trivia.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 6:53 PM

Unfortuntaley I wasn't very good at this game. I believe I ended up getting 5 answers correct. However what was intersting about this article was to see how each starbucks was placed in certain areas. There were so much more starbucks locations in city areas. The starbucks' also typically were off of main highways or corners. This is for similiar reasons to what we dicussed about dunkin donuts in class. People are only going to travel so far for coffee. If it is not convienent then people will go else where. It is not like car dealership where people will drive out of their way to look. For a coffee people on average may drive 5 minutes. Anything too out of the way people will avoid. That is why there are so many starbucks and dunkins so close to eachother. They are set up equdistant from each other in locations that are convient for people around the area to try and get them to choose their coffee. It is typical to put a coffee shop on the main roads like we see in the maps, as well as in numerous locations to convience the whole area. The more convient the shop the more money they will make. That is why there are some many locations so close to each other. It is interesting to see it visually on a map just how many locations there actually are. 

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Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.
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Your Love Of Quinoa Is Good News For Andean Farmers : NPR

Your Love Of Quinoa Is Good News For Andean Farmers : NPR | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Despite reports to the contrary, the global quinoa boom has not put the superfood out of reach for the people in Bolivia and Peru who grow it — though it has raised prices.
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MapMaker Interactive - National Geographic Education

MapMaker Interactive - National Geographic Education | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Use our tools to explore the world, learn about human and physical patterns, and make your own maps.

 

This is an excellent online resource to allow student to create thematic maps without GIS software.  


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The Health Toll of Immigration

The Health Toll of Immigration | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
A growing body of mortality research on immigrants has shown that the longer they live in the United States, the worse their rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 7, 2013 10:55 PM

This article highlights a fascinating cultural shift that impacts the migrants that come to the United States.  The second generation might have more money but they tend to live shorter lives than their parents.  As the next generation becomes integrated into American pop culture, unhealthy habits follow (smoking, drinking, high-calorie diets and sedentary lifestyles). 


Tags: migrationpopular culture, population, food, culture.

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Understanding Population Pyramids

This covers what a population pyramid is, and how to analyze one. It covers the three basic shapes and how they correspond to population growth or decline. Fina
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