The Geography Classroom
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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 4:02 PM

This gallery of 16 families from around world together with their week food is quite a treat that shows agricultural, development and cultural patterns.  Pictured above is the Ayme family from Ecuador, just one of the many family's highlighted in the book Hungry Planet.  The Ayme family that typically spends $31.55 on food and commonly eat potato soup with cabbage.  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, worldwide, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, book reviews, culture, development, unit 3 culture.

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It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All!

It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All! | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

Ever since my first visit to to Disneyland, I was intrigued by the  the ride 'It's a Small World After All."  As a youngster, it was an opportunity to get in cool boat ride that I always regretted half way into the ride once the song was firmly chiseled into my mind.  This blog post explores the curious and fascinating geographical imaginations, the visions of folk cultures and global harmony behind this Disneyland ride.  This fabulous map charts that vision. 


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melissa stjean's comment, September 4, 2012 12:20 PM
"It's a small world" is what thousands if not millions of kids hear on this ride a year. They are driven through the continents and are greated by happy faces of the natives to that land. The ride is somewhat dumbed down for kids, showing them what "its really like" in these countries, but the truth is most of the these countries are not clean, and happy as Disney makes them out to be. Though the ride is a good step to open kids minds about the world, but when they grow up they realize that its not that small, happy world afterall.
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The United Nations at a Glance

The United Nations at a Glance | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
This is the site for the United Nations at a Glance. Here you will find information and links on history, members, visitis, employement and other details.

 

While some critize the ineffectiveness of the organization, the United Nations remains a key organization to get understanding modern geopolitics.  Through their UN voting patterns, we can assess the geopolitical motivations, interests and alliances of member states.  Also, initiatives (whether successful or not) and highlight the important issues of the day that globally aware students should understand.  


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Geography game: how well do you know the world?

Geography game: how well do you know the world? | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Play the Global development game: identify the world's countries and territories, rank them according to GDP then fingers at the ready for the picture round

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Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, December 22, 2012 3:42 AM

Geography game

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 6:46 AM

Are you ready?

 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 12, 2013 12:07 AM

Ughhhhhh, this is addicting. Must stop playing. Must keep playing so I can beat JC.

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Experiencing World Regional Geography

Experiencing World Regional Geography | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Two hundred countries and 20 times around the planet - a man's amazing journey in his Mercedes.

 

This 5 minute video is a glimpse into the life and travels of Gunther Holtorf, on a 23-year, 500,000 mile journey.  This man has experienced, lived and seen so many of the places, cultures and environments that we try to make come to life for our students as we study the wonderful world we live in.   


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