The Geography Classroom
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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Mrs. Watson's Class
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Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 2:00 PM
que lindo
oyndrila's curator insight, June 3, 2013 6:35 PM

Useful and interesting visuals. They help us to understand significant aspects like varying population density, variable intensity of use of social media, digital divide etc.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 10, 2013 1:12 PM

Communication and social media. 

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
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Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
An amazing 26-second video depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880.

This quick visualization is a excellent summary of the data of anthropogenic climate change.


Via Nathan Phillips, Seth Dixon
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 6:09 AM

I wonder why the climate is changing so much it seems to be devastating. It can probably affect a lot of people because many people depend on a certain type of weather to grow food or do anything else that involves the weather like going for a swim in a pool or lake. The weather is something that many people need and depend on. Many people want the heat because they cant be in a cold area or vise versa. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 13, 2013 12:13 AM

A great visual dispay showing how tempetures have flucuated over the past 130 years and the futer implications of climate change today. Thoughout the video it shows how the tempeture is chaging (rising and falling) all acorss the board. However you cleary see at the end that tempeture stop flucuating and only contiues to rise. While over all it is only a 1 or 2 dagree differnce, its clear that if we go 80 years with a stable tempture and then it starts to only get warmer that weve got a climate change problam on our hands. 

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


Via Seth Dixon
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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 1:06 PM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 7:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 8:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
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80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 6:26 PM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
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Wind Map

Wind Map | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version.  Super cool!!


Via Seth Dixon
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Ken Morrison's comment, August 31, 2012 1:25 AM
That was cool. Thanks for sharing. I have a new fun tool for virtual storm chasing. I'm not as adventurous as I used to be. Is there any chance that there is an international version? We had a big typhoon in Asia this past week. Crazy weather.
Luis Sadeck 's comment, September 24, 2013 2:01 PM
Very crazy this map! One good application from technics of collect of data and building of map enviromental.

Thanks for sharing
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2014 1:53 PM

This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version.  Super cool!!