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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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Making Sense of Maps

TED Talks Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city -- less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places.

 

This video touches on numerous themes that are crucial to geographers including: 1) how our minds arrange spatial information, 2) how to best graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your audience and 3) how mapping a place can be the impetus for changing outdated systems. This is the story of how a cartographer working to improve a local transportation system map, which in turn, started city projects to improve the infrastructure and public utilities in Dublin, Ireland. This cartographer argues that the best map design for a transport system needs to conform to how on cognitive mental mapping works more so than geographic accuracy (like so many subway maps do).

 

Tags: transportation, urban, mapping, cartography, planning, TED, video, unit 7 cities.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 12:42 PM
When trying to graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your particular audience, you will have a lot to take into consideration. How familiar are the travelers with the area you map out? Are there visuals to precisely mark on the map so that will they accurately correspond to the area?
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What is GIS?

This is a brief introduction to what geographic information systems are.  This is not a tutorial on how to use it, but a conceptual overview on the potential uses and applications for GIS.  

 

Tags: GIS, video, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples, geospatial, mapping and location.


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What are Continents?

This is not as straightforward a question as you might think. 


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Pangaea

Pangaea - the idea of Pangaea and some of the evidence behind it... 

 

This is a video produced by Khan Academy, which is a key resource and proponent for the 'flipped classroom.'  While they do not have many human geography resources (math is their specialty) they do have several video designed for teaching physical geography including this one that covers


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West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    


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Arlis Groves's comment, February 27, 2012 9:11 PM
Ah, I mean Karen. I see that my direct rescoop it from your site. Thanks. Arlis
ethne staniland's curator insight, May 16, 2013 8:58 AM

Not so much for the children but interesting none the less.

Beth Jung's curator insight, February 9, 5:26 AM

This article is about children trafficking and child labor in West Africa. The director of this documentary is trying to tell people around the world that almost all famous chocolate factories such as Snickers, Nestle, etc, use cocoa from the cocoa plantations in Ivory Coast that use child labor to make as much chocolate they can with the least amount of money used. There are serious issues going on in West Africa, because most cocoa plantation workers are children who were smuggled around many countries such as Mali, Niger, and Burkina Faso and were separated to isolated plantations. People who are working in the Cocoa Industry have all denied the fact that the children are working in the plantation; Even the Vice President of Ivory Coast denied the fact of children trafficking. Also, all the famous chocolate factories had declined the interview for this documentary. A lot of people around the village have helped the captured children escape back to their home, saving more than a hundred children. This article helped me understand more about Africa's bad economy. By using child trafficking, people get free workers as well as sell children; 230 Euros each. It costs less to buy children than to pay the workers. This article made me realize that the only way I could help the African children is to spread the awareness to the whole wide world. This article also made me want to go to Ivory Coast when I get older. Children Trafficking hurts my loving heart and I would go to Ivory Coast and help children go back to their home.

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Agriculture: Back to the Start

Coldplay's haunting classic 'The Scientist' is performed by country music legend Willie Nelson for the soundtrack of the short film entitled, "Back to the St...

 

Sure this is an animated commercial for Chipotle Grill, but this perfectly encapsulates the beliefs, values and ethics that underscore the organic farming movement. 


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:49 AM

A very insightful video into the organic farming movement. Chipotle is taking a leap into spreading the word about this, and personally I find it enlightening. It is nice to see such a widely known restaurant take in interest in the food they serve and it makes it seem like they care about their customers. When you eat at Chiptole, you know what you are eating, but with other fast food places you can't be sure exactly what went into making that hamburger. They want people to see that they can get organic food made fast and it still tastes good. Chipotle is starting a consumption cultural revolution. 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:57 AM

This video, although it is a Chipotle Grill advertisment, does make a clear point. The industrialization of agriculture has made our food unhealthy and has taken away jobs from the farmer. Although we are a highly industrialized and developed nation today, it is still necessary for our necessary food to be naturally grown on farms rather than in factories where it was not meant to be grown. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:13 PM

What this commercial is trying to make aware is that there are ethics involved in agriculture. What the organic farming movement is all about is providing good for people that is produced fresh and no harm is done to the animals or environment .

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FARM-Africa Cassava project

A short film showing the work of FARM-Africa's Maendeleo Agricultural Technology Fund (MATF) in Uganda. The National Farmers Union (NFU) is working with FARM...

 

The Green Revolution is (belatedly) impacting Africa.  Notice the cultural environment within which agriculture takes place here.   What are the gendered differences in the production of food?  What impact does that have on society?


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:29 AM
Wow not just the men in the video are working this hard, but women and children as well. It makes you think how much we have as Americans and how much we take everything for granted. These African people are tough, they have to do so much more to survive than we do.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 7, 2012 7:46 AM
This video helps us to see the innovative ways African farmers use Cassava. Cassava is a market crop that many African people are dependent on. They know in order to achieve an income from the crop they need to market it in different varieties, for example- to turn it in to flour. Cassava is labor intensive crop that can take up to a year to be at it's full potential, but the people, women and children included, know that they need to tend to the crop in every stage to insure its success. With the income from the crop, families are able to send their children to school.
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Food, Nutrition and Geography

Peter Menzel's beautiful photography and our Hungry Planet...

 

This video is a fascinating portal into global food systems and how globalization is impacting local foods.  He traveled around the world to see what families eat in a given week, and how much all the food cost and where it can from.  Many wealthy countries exhibit poor nutritional habits (eating food high in fat, sugar and salt) while some in poorer people have a very balanced diet.  This leads him to describe the 'Nutritional Transition.'  Warning before showing in class: there are brief instances of non-sexualized nudity in the video. 


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The Authoritative Map

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie "Pooh's Grand Adventure," the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map. 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable?  

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, K12, video. 

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Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
An amazing 26-second video depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880.

This quick visualization is a excellent summary of the data of anthropogenic climate change.


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:09 PM

I wonder why the climate is changing so much it seems to be devastating. It can probably affect a lot of people because many people depend on a certain type of weather to grow food or do anything else that involves the weather like going for a swim in a pool or lake. The weather is something that many people need and depend on. Many people want the heat because they cant be in a cold area or vise versa. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 12, 2013 4:13 PM

A great visual dispay showing how tempetures have flucuated over the past 130 years and the futer implications of climate change today. Thoughout the video it shows how the tempeture is chaging (rising and falling) all acorss the board. However you cleary see at the end that tempeture stop flucuating and only contiues to rise. While over all it is only a 1 or 2 dagree differnce, its clear that if we go 80 years with a stable tempture and then it starts to only get warmer that weve got a climate change problam on our hands. 

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This is Our Planet

The best thing about the space program is all the satellite imagery we receive to better understand our home planet. 


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Hayley Allen's comment, September 2, 2012 4:30 PM
This video was amazing because it showed the earth in a way that many people have rarely seen it. I have never seen the earth in this way and I think it is wonderful that our technology today allows us to see the world from this perspective. I hope we get to watch more videos similar to this one, during class this year.
Jennifer Keyorian's comment, September 2, 2012 6:26 PM
This video is really entertaining . You can see a lot of the lights from the cities and the mountains . The cameras they put on the satellites are amazing . Its cool to see what the world looks like from outer space with the amazing technology humans have created .
Haley Wayland's comment, September 2, 2012 9:32 PM
This video is so interesting. It really shows how advanced technology has become to be able to take a video of Earth from space. It is amazing how far we have come and how much we are capable of doing in our lifetime and beyond. It would be interesting to see how advanced technology will become over the next decades.
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West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Arlis Groves's comment, February 27, 2012 9:11 PM
Ah, I mean Karen. I see that my direct rescoop it from your site. Thanks. Arlis
ethne staniland's curator insight, May 16, 2013 8:58 AM

Not so much for the children but interesting none the less.

Beth Jung's curator insight, February 9, 5:26 AM

This article is about children trafficking and child labor in West Africa. The director of this documentary is trying to tell people around the world that almost all famous chocolate factories such as Snickers, Nestle, etc, use cocoa from the cocoa plantations in Ivory Coast that use child labor to make as much chocolate they can with the least amount of money used. There are serious issues going on in West Africa, because most cocoa plantation workers are children who were smuggled around many countries such as Mali, Niger, and Burkina Faso and were separated to isolated plantations. People who are working in the Cocoa Industry have all denied the fact that the children are working in the plantation; Even the Vice President of Ivory Coast denied the fact of children trafficking. Also, all the famous chocolate factories had declined the interview for this documentary. A lot of people around the village have helped the captured children escape back to their home, saving more than a hundred children. This article helped me understand more about Africa's bad economy. By using child trafficking, people get free workers as well as sell children; 230 Euros each. It costs less to buy children than to pay the workers. This article made me realize that the only way I could help the African children is to spread the awareness to the whole wide world. This article also made me want to go to Ivory Coast when I get older. Children Trafficking hurts my loving heart and I would go to Ivory Coast and help children go back to their home.

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
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Agriculture: Back to the Start

Coldplay's haunting classic 'The Scientist' is performed by country music legend Willie Nelson for the soundtrack of the short film entitled, "Back to the St...

 

Sure this is an animated commercial for Chipotle Grill, but this perfectly encapsulates the beliefs, values and ethics that underscore the organic farming movement. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:49 AM

A very insightful video into the organic farming movement. Chipotle is taking a leap into spreading the word about this, and personally I find it enlightening. It is nice to see such a widely known restaurant take in interest in the food they serve and it makes it seem like they care about their customers. When you eat at Chiptole, you know what you are eating, but with other fast food places you can't be sure exactly what went into making that hamburger. They want people to see that they can get organic food made fast and it still tastes good. Chipotle is starting a consumption cultural revolution. 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:57 AM

This video, although it is a Chipotle Grill advertisment, does make a clear point. The industrialization of agriculture has made our food unhealthy and has taken away jobs from the farmer. Although we are a highly industrialized and developed nation today, it is still necessary for our necessary food to be naturally grown on farms rather than in factories where it was not meant to be grown. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:13 PM

What this commercial is trying to make aware is that there are ethics involved in agriculture. What the organic farming movement is all about is providing good for people that is produced fresh and no harm is done to the animals or environment .

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Defining an Independent Nation

Defining an Independent Nation | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
While the terms country, state, and nation are often used interchangeably, there is a difference.

 

A straightforward explanation of important vocabulary terms for a political geography unit. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 16, 2012 7:07 PM
Do you think current maps contribute to the issue of using the terms country, state and nation interchangeably as they do not visually distinguish the differences between them?
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FARM-Africa Cassava project

A short film showing the work of FARM-Africa's Maendeleo Agricultural Technology Fund (MATF) in Uganda. The National Farmers Union (NFU) is working with FARM...

 

The Green Revolution is (belatedly) impacting Africa.  Notice the cultural environment within which agriculture takes place here.   What are the gendered differences in the production of food?  What impact does that have on society?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:29 AM
Wow not just the men in the video are working this hard, but women and children as well. It makes you think how much we have as Americans and how much we take everything for granted. These African people are tough, they have to do so much more to survive than we do.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 7, 2012 7:46 AM
This video helps us to see the innovative ways African farmers use Cassava. Cassava is a market crop that many African people are dependent on. They know in order to achieve an income from the crop they need to market it in different varieties, for example- to turn it in to flour. Cassava is labor intensive crop that can take up to a year to be at it's full potential, but the people, women and children included, know that they need to tend to the crop in every stage to insure its success. With the income from the crop, families are able to send their children to school.
Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
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The Geography of Hunger and Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk...

 

Excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues.   This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.  


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 4, 2011 10:02 PM
This is a incredible clip that does challenge students to synthesize information and make the connections between topics, but it can also help students to realize making a difference at a early age is important. I learned an abundance of facts just from watching, it was informative and intriguing. As I was watching the video I was thinking of ways it can be incorporated into the classroom. This video could get students to learn about the world's number one health risk. Incorporating it into the classroom by holding a food drive, or having a school wide fundraiser to donate to the British Red Cross is also another way to help. Getting our future minds informed and helping the community will make an impact in the future.