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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS

Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

"GIS has given us the chance to re-examine how the Civil War battle was won and lost." 


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Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 2014 10:34 PM

I really like this interactive map application.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 28, 2014 1:13 PM

unit 1

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 3:14 PM

Just another of the millions of uses for GIS...

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Why Are States So Red and Blue?

Why Are States So Red and Blue? | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Theories about our right-wing and left-wing mind-sets don't explain why they are tied to geography.

 

While not endorsing all the cultural assumptions in the article, this is still an interesting exploration into expalining why distinct places are are politically aligned with particular parties. 

 

Questions to ponder: What portions of the author's argument do you agree (or disagree) with?  What do you see as the reasons behind the spatial distributions of "blue" and "red" in the United States? 

 

Tags: political, place, USA, culture, unit 4 political.


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BraydenJulietteGeo's comment, November 21, 2013 1:26 PM
this is a extremely interesting article on how certain portions of our country are know for voting for certain political party's during presidential elections. We have seen this political pattern all through our history, and can now almost always guess what states will be red or blue when it comes time for elections. Because this talks about political party's I have put this under political
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Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help

Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
From San Diego to Brownsville, Tex., requests for assistance have become a drain on the resources of fire departments in cities on the United States border with Mexico.

 

This is a poignant example of how site and situation impact the local geographic factors. 


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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:05 PM

This is one factor I never thought about before reading the article. Borders are one of the defining concepts of what constitutes a nation, and yet in emergencies these boundaries can become much more fluid. Of course borders in the first place are a human creation, but I imagine that along any border in the world, someone in dire need would want to get to the closest hospital, even if they're crossing a border to do so. At this point the idea of the authority implicated alongside borders might begin to seem less important. Though this makes me wonder if there are some locations which have international treaties so that local foreign departments may cross the border to help.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 24, 2014 4:43 PM

Medical expenses are a burden on millions of people each and every year. With conditions like this on the border there is no wonder why the Calimex fire department and responders needed funds. They also need to do something about the conditions on the California/Mexican border.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 3, 1:18 PM

After reading this article I think there should be some type of health service at the border, using the fire trucks and ambulance as a taxi is unacceptable. If people crossing the border do not have health care as stated that some done, the ambulance and fire trucks should not have to cover the cost, money should be given to those fire stations across the border and without help the departments might run into some trouble.

 In San Diego more than half of the calls that the department receives comes from the port which is equivalent to the state borders. Are people seriously that desperate for a way to get across the border quicker? 

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TeachSpatial: Resources for Spatial Teaching and Learning

TeachSpatial: Resources for Spatial Teaching and Learning | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

This resource is a comprehensive approach to teaching spatial thinking skills. Terms with spatial reference (i.e.-place, diffusion, migration, situation, scale, region, centrality, proximity, etc.) are defined within their spatial context and related to their multiple curricular connections such as Life Science, Physical Science, Earth Science and (of course) Geography. These terms and concepts then link you to teaching resources, online modules, lesson plans and classroom activities. While useful for all units, this is especially useful for the beginning of a course to teach the importance of spatial thinking skills to then have them permeate the rest of the year. 


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Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World

Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Adapted from the book by Professor Susan Hanson...

 

This is an excellent review/summary of an edited volume that shows the value of geographic thought and its importance in the modern world.  This review conveniently gives a one paragraph synopsis of each chapter.  It does not need to be read chronologically, so you can pick and choose what you find relevant to your course.  The top 10 are (in order of inclusion in the book): the Idea of the Map, the Weather Map, GIS, Human Adjustment, Water Budget Climatology, Human Transformation of the Earth, Spatial Organization and Interdependence, Central Place Theory, Megalopolis and Sense of Place. 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 29, 2013 9:40 AM

This is an excellent review/summary of an edited volume that shows the value of geographic thought and its importance in the modern world.  This review conveniently gives a one paragraph synopsis of each chapter.  It does not need to be read chronologically, so you can pick and choose what you find relevant to your course.  The top 10 are (in order of inclusion in the book): the Idea of the Map, the Weather Map, GIS, Human Adjustment, Water Budget Climatology, Human Transformation of the Earth, Spatial Organization and Interdependence, Central Place Theory, Megalopolis and Sense of Place.

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 5:24 PM

Summary: This article demonstrated how geographic concepts have been able to change daily life for humans everywhere. It talked about the log term effect of many life changing geographic concepts, such as how maps have influenced weather forecasts which have become an important part of daily life.

 

Insight:  This article showed me how important geographic processes can be on daily life.  It also demonstrates that nearly everyone in a developed country today relies on their ability to read geographic information even in something as simple as a weather map.

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Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World

Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Adapted from the book by Professor Susan Hanson...

 

This is an excellent review/summary of an edited volume that shows the value of geographic thought and its importance in the modern world.  This review conveniently gives a one paragraph synopsis of each chapter.  It does not need to be read chronologically, so you can pick and choose what you find relevant to your course.  The top 10 are (in order of inclusion in the book): the Idea of the Map, the Weather Map, GIS, Human Adjustment, Water Budget Climatology, Human Transformation of the Earth, Spatial Organization and Interdependence, Central Place Theory, Megalopolis and Sense of Place. 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 29, 2013 9:40 AM

This is an excellent review/summary of an edited volume that shows the value of geographic thought and its importance in the modern world.  This review conveniently gives a one paragraph synopsis of each chapter.  It does not need to be read chronologically, so you can pick and choose what you find relevant to your course.  The top 10 are (in order of inclusion in the book): the Idea of the Map, the Weather Map, GIS, Human Adjustment, Water Budget Climatology, Human Transformation of the Earth, Spatial Organization and Interdependence, Central Place Theory, Megalopolis and Sense of Place.

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 5:24 PM

Summary: This article demonstrated how geographic concepts have been able to change daily life for humans everywhere. It talked about the log term effect of many life changing geographic concepts, such as how maps have influenced weather forecasts which have become an important part of daily life.

 

Insight:  This article showed me how important geographic processes can be on daily life.  It also demonstrates that nearly everyone in a developed country today relies on their ability to read geographic information even in something as simple as a weather map.

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GIS demonstrates links between health and location

GIS demonstrates links between health and location | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
The neighborhoods in which children and adolescents live and spend their time play a role in whether or not they eat a healthy diet, get enough exercise or become obese, concludes a collection of studies in a special theme issue of the American...

 

Spatial analysis shows that numerous disciplines can utilize the 'geographic advantage' to improve research. 


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TeachSpatial: Resources for Spatial Teaching and Learning

TeachSpatial: Resources for Spatial Teaching and Learning | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

This resource is a comprehensive approach to teaching spatial thinking skills. Terms with spatial reference (i.e.-place, diffusion, migration, situation, scale, region, centrality, proximity, etc.) are defined within their spatial context and related to their multiple curricular connections such as Life Science, Physical Science, Earth Science and (of course) Geography. These terms and concepts then link you to teaching resources, online modules, lesson plans and classroom activities. While useful for all units, this is especially useful for the beginning of a course to teach the importance of spatial thinking skills to then have them permeate the rest of the year. 


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What is Geo-literacy?

Geo-literacy extends far beyond knowing where places are on a map.  National Geographic Education has put an emphasis on geoliteracy, which entails spatial thinking skills and understanding systems in addition to content knowledge about locations and places. 


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Adam Lenaarts's curator insight, September 30, 2013 6:33 PM

Geo literacy explained to all people that don't know I Teacher Much more than just places...

Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2013 10:32 AM

Geo-literacy extends far beyond knowing where places are on a map.  National Geographic Education has put an emphasis on geo-literacy, which entails spatial thinking skills and understanding systems in addition to content knowledge about locations and places.

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:09 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concepts of geo-literacy and spatial perspective because it indicates that for a population to be knowledgeable about geography, it must go above the mere rote memorization of toponyms and instead explore the spatial characteristics of places.

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GIS demonstrates links between health and location

GIS demonstrates links between health and location | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
The neighborhoods in which children and adolescents live and spend their time play a role in whether or not they eat a healthy diet, get enough exercise or become obese, concludes a collection of studies in a special theme issue of the American...

 

Spatial analysis shows that numerous disciplines can utilize the 'geographic advantage' to improve research. 


Via Seth Dixon
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