The Geography Cla...
Follow
Find tag "socioeconomic"
565 views | +0 today
The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Street Art Project Maps Rap Lyric Shout Outs Around NYC

Street Art Project Maps Rap Lyric Shout Outs Around NYC | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
If a NYC location got a shout out in some rap lyrics, Jay Shells has probably made a sign out of them and placed it at that specific location for his amazing new project.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2013 1:51 PM

Street art has a subtle, but powerful connection with place.  How does an art installation alter a neighborhood's sense of place?  How does a place alter the meaning(s) of an art installation?


Tags: art, mapping, NYC, culture, landscape, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

bancoideas's curator insight, April 24, 2013 7:59 AM

¿que tal esta idea de arte callejero? Letras de rap y señaléticas de tránsito

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 23, 2013 10:28 AM

I just got back at two in the morning from a road trip with one of my cousins to see her sister in Maryland.  It was a fabulous time, and I'd like to point out that we did drive through New York, and caught some glimpses of NYC across the way.  My whole experience on the trip was illuminated by different forms of cultural exposure.  I rarely travel, and it was quite fascinating to see the different locations on the way.  One thing that I noticed was a large presence of graffiti, that completely varied in styles and colors in every city and every state.  It was as if these different people from different places all had different things to say.  The rap lyrics on signs are interesting as well, because these rap lines are not intended to be written on signs, contrasted from graffiti, which is meant to be seen publicly.  The culture in New York is one that includes art and appreciation of art, and these rap lyric signs are both catchy and artsy.  Poetry has long been a way to teach people to remember things- such as in nursery rhymes.  It seems to me that it would be sufficiently easier for a person to remember what avenue they are supposed to meet someone on, by quoting existing rap lyrics that are also present on signs in the area.  These aesthetic embellishments also demonstrate a striving towards a revival of a human blend of Platonic cultural ideas with the presenece of art and poetry in public, and the human imperfection that accompanies rap music with the stigma of sex, drugs, and violence. 

         One of the bad things about the trip was the traffic in New York, but if I had rap lyric signs to read, I really would not have been that bad off.  Some people like to read books or magazines while using the bathroom, and it is becoming increasingly clear that there must be a similar level of tolerance/inclination towards people wanting to read rap lyrics on signs in New York that indicate the areas referred to in song.  There really are very few problems with this, and I am often more offended by the billboards in cities that tell me what religious ideas are right for me to believe, such as the Christ-Supremacist group billboards that tell me Jesus will save me.  I think Kanye West is a slightly more contemporary savior that might be to the liking of the citizens of New York City... At least, in this particular place, during this particular time.

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Analysis Finds 3x More Farmers’ Markets in Areas with the Lowest Obesity Rates

Analysis Finds 3x More Farmers’ Markets in Areas with the Lowest Obesity Rates | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
An independent analysis conducted by mapping analytics firm PetersonGIS shows that locations with the highest obesity rates contain the fewest farmers’ markets.

 

Agricultural production has become a big business, not only in total dollars, but in the scale of production.  In the last 50 years, the rise of 'agribusiness' has dominated the food industry and has redefined how food is produced.  In reaction to this, farmers' markets and organic farming is enjoying success within select demographic groups...and this study shows some of the results of that linkage.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

"Political Landscapes"

"Political Landscapes" | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

While touring Kevin Babola's art studio yesterday, I found this thought-provoking piece entitled ‘Political Landscapes.’ I greatly enjoyed my conversation with the artist about the political, economic and urban visions that went into this painting.  The conceptual idea behind this painting started when the artist was exploring the neighborhoods of New Bedford, MA and noticed how a sense of place can change very quickly. I dare say most cities have areas similar to the one portrayed here where the socioeconomic character changes very abruptly. While physically it might be very easy to cross from the side of the street with tenements to the neighborhood with single family homes, making that transition permanent is incredibly difficult.

 

Questions to ponder: what leads to cities having abrupt changes in the urban fabric? What might this chasm represent to people on either side of the divide? How does this impact the neighborhood institutions (schools, local government, etc.)?  Please visit the artist's webpage at: http://www.kbolaillustration.com


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2013 1:03 PM

While touring Kevin Babola's art studio yesterday, I found this thought-provoking piece entitled ‘Political Landscapes.’ I greatly enjoyed my conversation with the artist about the political, economic and urban visions that went into this painting.  The conceptual idea behind this painting started when the artist was exploring the neighborhoods of New Bedford, MA and noticed how a sense of place can change very quickly. I dare say most cities have areas similar to the one portrayed here where the socioeconomic character changes very abruptly. While physically it might be very easy to cross from the side of the street with tenements to the neighborhood with single family homes, making that transition permanent is incredibly difficult.

 

Questions to ponder: what leads to cities having abrupt changes in the urban fabric? What might this chasm represent to people on either side of the divide? How does this impact the neighborhood institutions (schools, local government, etc.)?  Please visit the artist's webpage at: http://www.kbolaillustration.com

Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 8:41 AM
this picture meant a lot to me simple due to the fact that I've lived in the city of providence for the last three years now. everywhere I look in the city shows an identical view to this picture that protrays inner-city compact houses vs grass and space of the kind of suburbs. on the right is the inner-city version where houses are only separated by a one car width driveway and are two to three stores high to accommadate more families and people. the left side of the picture protrays a more suburb area of the city. but this area isn't necessarily the suburbs because it would be an area just minute outside of the busy city center like a north providence or east providence area. in north providence yes you technically have a yard and grass but it is so small that you mine as well have scissors to cut the lawn. with a bite more space houses being more single family oriented this is more luxurious than the left side of the picture
Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:27 PM

This pictures shows the difference between the city and suburbs. Even in the same city, you can  have some parts that look more economically wealthier. But looking at it from a political view, I would guess that the whole in the ground that divides the two neighborhoods would be the line that divides democrats and republicans. City folk tend to vote more democrat because they want the government to assist the people. WHile Republicans tend to look out more for themselves.