The Geography Classroom
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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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The Detroit Bus Company

"Young entrepreneur Andy Didorosi believes that the way to Detroit’s new era depends on better leadership and a solid connection between the city and the suburbs. The city in 2012 axed its plans to build the M-1 light rail, the transit solution that would’ve bridged that vital connection, Didorosi bought a bus, had a local artist trick it out with a wicked mural, and he started the Detroit Bus Company.  Dedicated to a more connected city, Andy Didorosi is bringing Detroit home one ride at a time."


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Jackie Hinton's comment, July 19, 2013 12:18 PM
love the video,didn't know detroit was in that bad of shape.
Betty Denise's comment, July 20, 2013 5:45 AM
http://www.marchandmeffre.com/detroit/index.html (Detroit détruite)
Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:52 PM

Andy is creating a transportation system for the new Detroit.  Once the inevitable downsize takes place his idea for transportation could take off.

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Gendered Differences in Development

Gendered Differences in Development | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

Being a woman can be much more difficult, based on where you live. 

 


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Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty

Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Extreme poverty in the United States is giving rise to a group of infections known as the neglected tropical diseases, which we ordinarily think of as confined to developing countries.

 

Poor Americans are more likely to contract tropical diseases such as Chagas disease and dengue fever.  Question to ponder: what geographic factors (physical and human) lead poor people in the United States to be more heavily impacted by the spread to these diseases?


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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 25, 2013 6:23 PM
I think it is absurd that the pharmaceutical companies don't see it beneficial enough to produce the vaccines necessary to prevent outbreaks of the potentially harmful diseases. These people may be low-income, but they are still humans and there is no barrier stopping the spreading to middle-class higher income families.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
With the level of development in the United States and the amount of technology there is, it is a little surprising to see such a large number of people living in poverty, but at the same time it is almost expected. Minorities make up the bulk of those living in poverty, which are the biggest targets for these rapidly spreading diseases. Since these people unfortunately receive a below average salary, if any at all, they don’t get the proper health care needed and their symptoms are often overlooked or neglected. They are basically prone to get infected because either their health care provider does not have the knowledge to diagnose and treat these diseases before they spread or the patient does not have the money to pay for treatment and vaccines. These prolonged and chronic diseases are what cause them to stay in the financial situations they are in. Helping these people get better healthcare and providing the doctors with the education needed for these diseases would definitely help. I do find it absurd that some pharmacists believe it is unnecessary to make vaccines when this could easily be passed down from a pregnant woman to her offspring, creating another generation of health disasters.
Alex Weaver's curator insight, October 14, 2013 7:11 PM

NTDs creates a vicious poverty cycle, but WE can help end this

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NYTimes Video: Linking Gaza to the Outside World

NYTimes Video: Linking Gaza to the Outside World | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
A look inside the controversial underground tunnels that link Egypt and the Gaza Strip, where smugglers funnel fuel, food, and potentially weapons into the isolated territory.

 

This video is a look inside the some of the hundreds of tunnels that are used to smuggle goods into Gaza that have become more intensely used since the blockade on goods that went into effect in 2007 when Hamas came to power.  Also, members of the Israeli military demonstrate the evidence they have that these tunnels are being used to bring weapons. 


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West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    


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John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:03 PM

I was not aware that slavery is still not unusual in cocoa plantation in West Africa. It sickens me because nations all around the world consume chocolate produced under slave labor. 

AnthonyAcosta/NoahMata's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:36 PM

 (Social)

 

Chocolate is a very known thing in first world countries and is not known for what is needed to make it. So in Africa they smuggle children from various places in Africa and force them to labor for cocoa beans and work on plantations. Many young children near there   Teen ages are taken and put through labor for most of there young lives.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:13 PM

i mainly find it amazing that slavery is still so commonplace in parts of the world. whether it is "illegal" or not is irrelivent in these parts of the world and child labor and slavery is such a dominating force in labor.

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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:48 AM

It's fascinating to look at the effects of globalization, and a great look at how economies change.  When people in the Western world drop a bag of clothes off at a charity, I doubt we think they'd end up in a village in Africa. Warning:  it does get a little preachy at the end. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.

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Lives on the Line

Lives on the Line | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

As mentioned by the cartographers of this London map, maps have a way of highlighting the social inequalities especially at the neighborhood scale in the urban environment.  Each ward (census tract is colored according to child poverty rates, and the numbers represent life expectany rates in the neighborhood near each underground stop. 


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Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty

Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Extreme poverty in the United States is giving rise to a group of infections known as the neglected tropical diseases, which we ordinarily think of as confined to developing countries.

 

Poor Americans are more likely to contract tropical diseases such as Chagas disease and dengue fever.  Question to ponder: what geographic factors (physical and human) lead poor people in the United States to be more heavily impacted by the spread to these diseases?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 25, 2013 6:23 PM
I think it is absurd that the pharmaceutical companies don't see it beneficial enough to produce the vaccines necessary to prevent outbreaks of the potentially harmful diseases. These people may be low-income, but they are still humans and there is no barrier stopping the spreading to middle-class higher income families.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
With the level of development in the United States and the amount of technology there is, it is a little surprising to see such a large number of people living in poverty, but at the same time it is almost expected. Minorities make up the bulk of those living in poverty, which are the biggest targets for these rapidly spreading diseases. Since these people unfortunately receive a below average salary, if any at all, they don’t get the proper health care needed and their symptoms are often overlooked or neglected. They are basically prone to get infected because either their health care provider does not have the knowledge to diagnose and treat these diseases before they spread or the patient does not have the money to pay for treatment and vaccines. These prolonged and chronic diseases are what cause them to stay in the financial situations they are in. Helping these people get better healthcare and providing the doctors with the education needed for these diseases would definitely help. I do find it absurd that some pharmacists believe it is unnecessary to make vaccines when this could easily be passed down from a pregnant woman to her offspring, creating another generation of health disasters.
Alex Weaver's curator insight, October 14, 2013 7:11 PM

NTDs creates a vicious poverty cycle, but WE can help end this

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    


Via Seth Dixon
more...
John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:03 PM

I was not aware that slavery is still not unusual in cocoa plantation in West Africa. It sickens me because nations all around the world consume chocolate produced under slave labor. 

AnthonyAcosta/NoahMata's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:36 PM

 (Social)

 

Chocolate is a very known thing in first world countries and is not known for what is needed to make it. So in Africa they smuggle children from various places in Africa and force them to labor for cocoa beans and work on plantations. Many young children near there   Teen ages are taken and put through labor for most of there young lives.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:13 PM

i mainly find it amazing that slavery is still so commonplace in parts of the world. whether it is "illegal" or not is irrelivent in these parts of the world and child labor and slavery is such a dominating force in labor.

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Hunger and Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk...

 

Excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues.   This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.  


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 1:02 AM
This is a incredible clip that does challenge students to synthesize information and make the connections between topics, but it can also help students to realize making a difference at a early age is important. I learned an abundance of facts just from watching, it was informative and intriguing. As I was watching the video I was thinking of ways it can be incorporated into the classroom. This video could get students to learn about the world's number one health risk. Incorporating it into the classroom by holding a food drive, or having a school wide fundraiser to donate to the British Red Cross is also another way to help. Getting our future minds informed and helping the community will make an impact in the future.