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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.
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Next Supercontinent Will Amaze You

Next Supercontinent Will Amaze You | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Fifty million to 200 million years from now, geologists expect Earth's continents to smash together into one big supercontinent, just as they've done repeatedly in our planet's distant past — and a new computer model suggests that the Arctic Ocean...

 

This graphic displays the fluidity of the plate tectonic systems, and instead of thinking about what happened during the era of the dinosaurs, looking into the future provides an interesting perspective the dynamism of Earth systems (Disclaimer: this is one possibility on what might happen, there are other possible outcomes).  In human geography, I use this map to discussion the concept of region: regions are not static, but the the Earth is put together is (sometimes literally) shifting beneath our feet. 


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 29, 1:12 AM

The continental drift shows that 225 million years ago, Africa, Asia & Europe, North America and South America were touching while Antarctica and Australia were really close to those 5 continents. These 7 continents together were known as Pangea. 125 million years later North America, Africa and Europe elevated north in terms of latitude but to sum it up, North America, South America, Africa and Europe all drifted north in the world. Let's jump ahead 50 million to 200 million years from now. North America, South America, Europe and Africa can quite possibly all drift northward. As for Asia, the only difference between 225 million years ago and now is that Asia drifted east and barely drifted north. Also, I feel that Australia will barely make it to the equator since it barely drifted northward throughout the past 225 million years.

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Wind Map

Wind Map | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version.  Super cool!!


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Ken Morrison's comment, August 30, 2012 8:25 PM
That was cool. Thanks for sharing. I have a new fun tool for virtual storm chasing. I'm not as adventurous as I used to be. Is there any chance that there is an international version? We had a big typhoon in Asia this past week. Crazy weather.
Luis Sadeck 's comment, September 24, 2013 9:01 AM
Very crazy this map! One good application from technics of collect of data and building of map enviromental.

Thanks for sharing
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2014 8:53 AM

This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version.  Super cool!!

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Pangaea

Pangaea - the idea of Pangaea and some of the evidence behind it... 

 

This is a video produced by Khan Academy, which is a key resource and proponent for the 'flipped classroom.'  While they do not have many human geography resources (math is their specialty) they do have several video designed for teaching physical geography including this one that covers


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Michelle Winemiller's curator insight, January 22, 2:22 PM

great source with the video information and fossil evidence for students to get good reinforcement

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Texas Storm Was Over Eight Miles High

Texas Storm Was Over Eight Miles High | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
The astonishing power of Mother Nature....

 

3D NASA images show the magnitude of last week's storm in Texas was immense, vertically towering 8 miles above the Texas landscape.  The storm "spawning 14 tornadoes and golf ball sized hail was immense...[NASA's] Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite watched the storm develop and measured its cloud height at above eight miles high." 


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