The Geography Classroom
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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."


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Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:21 PM

Even though this article is now three years old, it is refreshing to see that Mexico is really making their mark on the global market. The Global North seems to be coming to a stalemate while "up and coming countries" like Mexico are becoming the perfect place for people to begin their businesses and have a fresh start on life. I can understand though, how it was mentioned on the third page of the article, that some locals may feel that foreigners, European especially, may be receiving some type of special treatment due to past colonialism. However, these entrepreneurs are shaping the economy of Mexico. This is Mexico's chance to advance in the world and increase its GDP. Young, aspiring moguls all seems to feel the same way about their homelands, "Europe, dying; Mexico, coming to life. The United States, closed and materialistic; Mexico, open and creative" and Diego Quemada-Diez, a Spanish director, was quoted in the article, "Europe feels spiritually dead and so does the United States...[y]ou end up wanting something else".  And apparently, Mexico has that "something else".

 

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 21, 2015 10:25 AM

Again, I would be interested in seeing how these statistics would change if they were to factor in illegal immigration from Mexico into the United States, but the data remains promising. Mexico has the potential to be an economic powerhouse, and hopefully will utilize this potential sooner rather than later. Although rampant corruption remains in the nation's politics and reinforcement agencies, a strong Mexican economy will ultimately deescalate the violence by stripping the cartels of their strongest allure- well-paying employment for uneducated young men. A stronger Mexican economy will also undoubtedly help the US in terms of trade, as well as reducing the rate of cartel-related violence in the southern regions of the nation. With so many Americans today rallying around Trump's racially-charged rants on Mexican immigration, it brings a smile to my face that we are currently sending more Americans to take Mexican jobs than they are sending our way. The hypocrisy of these politicians and their policies are laughable. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:20 AM

I’ve posted earlier about the end of cheap China; the rising cost of doing business in China coupled with the higher transportation costs to get goods to North American and European markets have made manufacturing in Mexican much more competitive on the global market.  Many investors are turning to Mexico as an emerging land of opportunity and Mexico is now a destination for migrants.  This is still a new pattern:  only 1 percent of the country is foreign-born compared to the 13 percent that you would see in the United States.  Mexican migration to the United States has stabilized; about as many Mexicans have moved to the U.S. (2005-2010) as those that have moved south of the border.


Tags: Mexico, industry, location, place, migration.

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The Health Toll of Immigration

The Health Toll of Immigration | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
A growing body of mortality research on immigrants has shown that the longer they live in the United States, the worse their rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 7, 2013 10:55 PM

This article highlights a fascinating cultural shift that impacts the migrants that come to the United States.  The second generation might have more money but they tend to live shorter lives than their parents.  As the next generation becomes integrated into American pop culture, unhealthy habits follow (smoking, drinking, high-calorie diets and sedentary lifestyles). 


Tags: migrationpopular culture, population, food, culture.

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What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration?

What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration? | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, warns that a backlash against immigration would wreak havoc on everything from hospitals to the high-tech industry. The interview is part of the Risk Response Network’s “What if?

 

This is article can be an intriguing introduction to a thought exercise geared towards understanding the economic impact of migration and the social processes that create our world. 

 

Questions to ponder:  Which points of the interviewee do you agree with?  Are there some that you think his analysis is off-base?  What do you think the impacts on a given location would be if there was no migration allowed? 

 

Tags:  migration, economic, unit 2 population, immigration, unit 6 industry, labor.


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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 3, 2015 4:09 PM

When it comes to ethnic groups in the United States, many of the hispanic/mexican ancestors occur in the southwestern area of the United States. That's obviously because Mexico is southwest of the United States. When it comes to emigrating from Mexico, individuals immigrate to the United States (mostly southwest of the United States) so they can live a different, hopefully better economy. Plus, they try to escape the gang violence and drug violence in Mexico.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 1:05 PM

This is a good representation of chain migration.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, April 3, 2015 1:46 PM

Migration

This map show the most popular migratory flows of migration from Mexico to the US. 

This ties into our unit about migration because many Mexicans migrate to the US every year. This map shows the patterns and paths of the migration. 

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The Importance of Place

The Importance of Place | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

Using the vocabulary of this course, please describe in detail the geographic context of a town like this (real or imaginary).  What is the town like?  How did it get that way?  What type of meaning does 'place' have for those that live there?  


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The Health Toll of Immigration

The Health Toll of Immigration | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
A growing body of mortality research on immigrants has shown that the longer they live in the United States, the worse their rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 7, 2013 10:55 PM

This article highlights a fascinating cultural shift that impacts the migrants that come to the United States.  The second generation might have more money but they tend to live shorter lives than their parents.  As the next generation becomes integrated into American pop culture, unhealthy habits follow (smoking, drinking, high-calorie diets and sedentary lifestyles). 


Tags: migrationpopular culture, population, food, culture.

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God Grew Tired of Us

God Grew Tired of Us | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

The story of the "Lost Boys" of Sudan is a heartbreaking and inspiring tale of youth caught in cultural and geopolitical conflicts and fored to leave their homes. The film God Grew Tired of Us tells a moving story of young people overcoming incredible challenges and struggling to improve their own lives and those of family and friends left behind."  Linked here is a lsson plan from National Geographic "to teach students about concepts of migration, cultural mosaics, sense of place, and forces of cooperation and conflict among communities" using this 90 minute documentary.  The film can be viewed online on HULU as well as other media outlets.  

 

Tags: culture, Africa, political, conflict, war, migration, development, APHG. 


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The Importance of Place

The Importance of Place | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

Using the vocabulary of this course, please describe in detail the geographic context of a town like this (real or imaginary).  What is the town like?  How did it get that way?  What type of meaning does 'place' have for those that live there?  


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Mapping migration-China and India

Mapping migration-China and India | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Where are the world's biggest Chinese and Indian immigrant communities? MORE Chinese people live outside mainland China than French people live in France, with some to be found in almost every country.

 

The two most populous countries in the world, India and China, are mentioned frequently when teaching population geography.  However, it is typical in the United States to pass over these countries when discussing migration; this graphic shows the diasporas are quite extensive and highly influential. 


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:59 PM

When I first came across this article I thought it was intriguing but not surprising. Most people fleeing from India and China go somewhere nearby versus somewhere far away. Places like Cambodia, Vietnam, and Indonesia have a high rate of Chinese and Indian migrants, which proves one of Ravenstein's laws.

Clayton and Annie's curator insight, February 12, 2015 10:07 AM

This is showing indias geography. This article is telling you where the most populated parts of India are. Which are most of them live out side of China. The two most populated countrys are India and China. India has a higher people per square mile than China. 

Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:58 AM

Summary- More Chinese people live outside mainland China than French people live in France. Some 22m ethnic Indians are scattered across every continent. Diasporas have been a part of the world for millennia; they are quite extensive and highly influential.The map highlights the world's top 20 destinations for Chinese and Indian migrants

 

Insight- since China and India are the most populous countries of the world, it makes sense that we ask ourselves "well, do people there ever go to other places to find a little bit more of personal space that is so scarce in their home countries?" They actually do. Maybe it is not because they need personal space. Working opportunities and better living conditions might be what drives these people to migrate from their countries.