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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

Via Seth Dixon
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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 7:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
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80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


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Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 10:26 AM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
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The Changing Geography of Quinoa

The Changing Geography of Quinoa | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Bolivian and Peruvian farmers sell entire crop to meet rising western demand, sparking fears of malnutrition

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 11, 2013 12:50 PM
Amazing what the demand from the US, Western Europe and Japan could do to the eating habits of people in Peru, Bolivia and the area in general.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 23, 2013 7:38 PM

The beautiful Quinoa plants grow and thrive in harsh conditions where nothing else can grow. Quinoa is one of the planets most nutritious food source that was once just a sacred crop for the Andean culture. It is now a health food for the middle class in the US and Europe, but the increased demand means less for the people of Bolivia and Peru and tripled prices. Many are concerned this could cause malnutrition because it is their main food source and it is now being taken from them at a rapid pace. Battles have even begun to be fought over prime Quinoa growing land. I love Quinoa, and its a big part of my diet but I never realized how important it was to the people of Bolivia and Peru or how much they relied on it.       

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 7:17 AM

I have never heard of Quinoa until I read this article.  I found myself amazed at the properties of this food especially when it is grown in such an inhospitable environment for growing other crops.  It is sad that the poor people eat less of it now but the income it generates for them is a good thing.  It allows them to increase their standards of living and entices people to return to their home villages rather than crowd into cities. With the increased income they can improve the variety of foods in their diets even if it means the decrease in consumption of the quinoa.