The Geography Classroom
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The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
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Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
An amazing 26-second video depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880.

This quick visualization is a excellent summary of the data of anthropogenic climate change.


Via Nathan Phillips, Seth Dixon
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:09 AM

I wonder why the climate is changing so much it seems to be devastating. It can probably affect a lot of people because many people depend on a certain type of weather to grow food or do anything else that involves the weather like going for a swim in a pool or lake. The weather is something that many people need and depend on. Many people want the heat because they cant be in a cold area or vise versa. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:13 PM

A great visual dispay showing how tempetures have flucuated over the past 130 years and the futer implications of climate change today. Thoughout the video it shows how the tempeture is chaging (rising and falling) all acorss the board. However you cleary see at the end that tempeture stop flucuating and only contiues to rise. While over all it is only a 1 or 2 dagree differnce, its clear that if we go 80 years with a stable tempture and then it starts to only get warmer that weve got a climate change problam on our hands. 

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
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Climate Change and Sustainability

Climate Change and Sustainability | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

I'll let the comic (by Pulitzer cartoonist Joel Pett) speak for itself. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Mr. David Burton's comment, April 16, 2012 9:19 PM
That's funny!
Seth Dixon's comment, April 16, 2012 10:01 PM
Too funny to keep to myself.
Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
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Texas Storm Was Over Eight Miles High

Texas Storm Was Over Eight Miles High | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
The astonishing power of Mother Nature....

 

3D NASA images show the magnitude of last week's storm in Texas was immense, vertically towering 8 miles above the Texas landscape.  The storm "spawning 14 tornadoes and golf ball sized hail was immense...[NASA's] Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite watched the storm develop and measured its cloud height at above eight miles high." 


Via Seth Dixon
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Countries must plan for climate refugees

Countries must plan for climate refugees | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The world's governments and relief agencies need to plan now to resettle millions of people expected to be displaced by climate change, an international panel of experts said on...

Climate change and political geography should merge, but unfortunately not in this way. 


Via Cathryn Wellner, Seth Dixon
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Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

One of the key things I reinforce in conversations about globalization is that the advantages are unevenly distributed and the negative externalities to the system are also unevenly distributed.  This clever infographic highlights both rather effectively. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 3:26 PM
Really surprised at a couple things:
1. Brazil's relative tinyness in comparison with the U.S. Guess I've always just heard bad things about Brazil in regards to deforestation and the like.
2. Just how much a formerly agricultural nation (China) has exploded. Something really needs to be done about the environmental havoc they are wreaking (not to be a total ethnocentrist or anything).
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Feeding 7 billion & our Fragile Environment

Feeding 7 billion & our Fragile Environment | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

This photoessay puts together a diverse set of issues that are interconnected.  Industrial agriculture and metropolitan pollution; rising energy prices to sustain consumptive lifestyles with environmental degradation linked to oil spills; regions susceptible to climate change and regions producing that change...thought-provoking.  


Via Seth Dixon
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Daniella Tran's comment, February 21, 2013 11:03 PM
I had always known that the amount of humans on this planet was way too much, but i had never realized that our daily consumption of all these resources can result in the issues that are shown in these pictures. These pictures show areas that are highly polluted and it is overwhelming to think that the beautiful earth that we live in is filled with images like that. The number of factors that affect our environment is countless, especially with the growing figures of pollution, waste, use of natural resources and food production. The photo that stood out to me the most from this collection, is the one where the polar bear had to resort to eating a polar bear cub. It is difficult to think that the polar bear did that act as a sign of desperation because of the lack of food affected by the changing environment.