The Geography Classroom
609 views | +0 today
Follow
The Geography Classroom
Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
Curated by Elisha Upton
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 6:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Are States So Red and Blue?

Why Are States So Red and Blue? | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Theories about our right-wing and left-wing mind-sets don't explain why they are tied to geography.

 

While not endorsing all the cultural assumptions in the article, this is still an interesting exploration into expalining why distinct places are are politically aligned with particular parties. 

 

Questions to ponder: What portions of the author's argument do you agree (or disagree) with?  What do you see as the reasons behind the spatial distributions of "blue" and "red" in the United States? 

 

Tags: political, place, USA, culture, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
BraydenJulietteGeo's comment, November 21, 2013 1:26 PM
this is a extremely interesting article on how certain portions of our country are know for voting for certain political party's during presidential elections. We have seen this political pattern all through our history, and can now almost always guess what states will be red or blue when it comes time for elections. Because this talks about political party's I have put this under political
Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Survey: Maine ranked 'most peaceful' state; Louisiana last

Survey: Maine ranked 'most peaceful' state; Louisiana last | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
An annual survey ranks Maine as the "most peaceful" state, while Louisiana places last for the 11th straight year.

 

The five criteria used in the ranking are the number of homicides per 100,000 people; number of violent crimes; incarceration rate; number of police employees; and availability of small arms.  How 'peaceful' is it where you live?  How would you measure it?  The Providence RI metro area is ranked as the 6th most peaceful place among metropolitan areas.    


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Infographic: United States of the Environment

Infographic: United States of the Environment | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Every U.S. state is No. 1 in some environmental category ... and No. 50 in another.

 

A fun map that can be used to discuss environmental issues at both the national and local level for American teachers. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 22, 2014 3:11 PM

Rhode Island excels at having the lowest CO2 emissions. This makes a lot of sense when you consider the characteristics the State as it relates to pollution. Manufacturing is not a large part of Rhode Island's production, therefore CO2 emissions from factories is less than many other states. Furthermore CO2 from automobiles is low because of the small size of the state. Commutes for people working and living in Rhode Island are no longer than an hour each way. The minimal drive time for each person also cuts down possible emissions. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 8:41 PM

This fun and interactive map shows where each state excel and where they falter. Its interesting to see that in a state a small as Rhode Island, it has the highest rate of breast cancer in the nation. And the state of Colorado has the most avalanche deaths, which when you think of the state of Colorado, you wouldn't think of Colorado as a state with a lot of avalanches. What really surprised me  was Alaska as having the most airports per capita. One wouldn't think this of Alaska since it is a state covered mostly with snow. And it raises the question as to how many people travel in and out of the state. With all of the states surprises, one thing that shocked me a bit was how much organic food is grown in this land. That's one thing that is surprising. I once viewed this land as a of imports of just about everything, but looking at these two maps have changed my outlook of this land.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 24, 2015 10:12 PM

Scary to look at the New England region as five of the six states are highest in a form of cancer.Is there a causal connection that should be investigated? Probably doesn't help we live next door to NY and NJ, highest in air pollution and most Superfund sites respectively. As a parent with a son who has autism, I feel for the folks in Ohio. Both California and Florida get the "duh" award for leading in smog and boating wrecks.

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 16, 2012 3:39 PM

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 1:26 PM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty

Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Extreme poverty in the United States is giving rise to a group of infections known as the neglected tropical diseases, which we ordinarily think of as confined to developing countries.

 

Poor Americans are more likely to contract tropical diseases such as Chagas disease and dengue fever.  Question to ponder: what geographic factors (physical and human) lead poor people in the United States to be more heavily impacted by the spread to these diseases?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 25, 2013 6:23 PM
I think it is absurd that the pharmaceutical companies don't see it beneficial enough to produce the vaccines necessary to prevent outbreaks of the potentially harmful diseases. These people may be low-income, but they are still humans and there is no barrier stopping the spreading to middle-class higher income families.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
With the level of development in the United States and the amount of technology there is, it is a little surprising to see such a large number of people living in poverty, but at the same time it is almost expected. Minorities make up the bulk of those living in poverty, which are the biggest targets for these rapidly spreading diseases. Since these people unfortunately receive a below average salary, if any at all, they don’t get the proper health care needed and their symptoms are often overlooked or neglected. They are basically prone to get infected because either their health care provider does not have the knowledge to diagnose and treat these diseases before they spread or the patient does not have the money to pay for treatment and vaccines. These prolonged and chronic diseases are what cause them to stay in the financial situations they are in. Helping these people get better healthcare and providing the doctors with the education needed for these diseases would definitely help. I do find it absurd that some pharmacists believe it is unnecessary to make vaccines when this could easily be passed down from a pregnant woman to her offspring, creating another generation of health disasters.
Alex Weaver's curator insight, October 14, 2013 7:11 PM

NTDs creates a vicious poverty cycle, but WE can help end this

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty

Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Extreme poverty in the United States is giving rise to a group of infections known as the neglected tropical diseases, which we ordinarily think of as confined to developing countries.

 

Poor Americans are more likely to contract tropical diseases such as Chagas disease and dengue fever.  Question to ponder: what geographic factors (physical and human) lead poor people in the United States to be more heavily impacted by the spread to these diseases?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 25, 2013 6:23 PM
I think it is absurd that the pharmaceutical companies don't see it beneficial enough to produce the vaccines necessary to prevent outbreaks of the potentially harmful diseases. These people may be low-income, but they are still humans and there is no barrier stopping the spreading to middle-class higher income families.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
With the level of development in the United States and the amount of technology there is, it is a little surprising to see such a large number of people living in poverty, but at the same time it is almost expected. Minorities make up the bulk of those living in poverty, which are the biggest targets for these rapidly spreading diseases. Since these people unfortunately receive a below average salary, if any at all, they don’t get the proper health care needed and their symptoms are often overlooked or neglected. They are basically prone to get infected because either their health care provider does not have the knowledge to diagnose and treat these diseases before they spread or the patient does not have the money to pay for treatment and vaccines. These prolonged and chronic diseases are what cause them to stay in the financial situations they are in. Helping these people get better healthcare and providing the doctors with the education needed for these diseases would definitely help. I do find it absurd that some pharmacists believe it is unnecessary to make vaccines when this could easily be passed down from a pregnant woman to her offspring, creating another generation of health disasters.
Alex Weaver's curator insight, October 14, 2013 7:11 PM

NTDs creates a vicious poverty cycle, but WE can help end this