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Linking geographic concepts to human and environmental issues
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Where Is Europe?

Where Is Europe? | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
As both a concept and a continent, the area known as Europe has shifted over time.

 

Many see Europe (as a physical landmass) as not a discrete continent, but a peninsula on the Eurasian landmass.  Culturally though, the idea of Europe as distinctly bracketed of from Asia, is a powerful idea is not in the Western World.  Where is Europe?  What is Europe?  This article would provide good information for a lesson on regions and how we conceptualize the world within that regional framework. 


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 10:59 AM

Europe has never been a static concept, it's likely that even people who live in the same town as you have a different idea of what constitutes the far borders of Europe. Personally I like to make a distinction between types of Europe. It seems to me that what was traditionally Northern and Western Europe differ from Southern and Eastern Europe in a wide variety of ways, especially due to Southern Europe's proximity to Africa and the Middle East.

 

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Devolution: A Beginner's Guide

Devolution: A Beginner's Guide | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
What is devolution and how has it changed how Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales are governed?

 

This article with videos, charts and images was designed as a primer for UK voters for the 2010 election to understand who devolution in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland were reshaping the political landscape in the United Kingdom.  It is general enough that even though it is outdated as a news story, it serves as a concrete example from geography students to understand the processes and reasons for a decentralization of political power.


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chris tobin's curator insight, March 22, 2013 4:23 PM

Here is an article March 2013 updating the latest in Wales

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-politics-21683771

 

"Silk Commission:  Mixed Reaction Over Devolution Power" 3/16/2013 BBC

 

     Since 1997 there have been many changes in the devolution processes Westminster still holds the most governing decisions but it seems that the UK taxpayers do not want their money to go to other countries for public services. 

Railing is a big issue since there have been alot of plans for improving infrastructure in transportation to build up the economy.  This will be particularly interesting to follow in the news.

     Liberal Democrat Leader Kirsty Williams stated a need for a new model of devolution  with clear definitions and the Conservative Lib. Dem. coalition's 114 page document to the Silk Commission states policing, broadcasting, and energy projects should remain under Westminster but to devolve teachers pay and rail franchises.

 

 

 

    

    

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 9:51 PM

The devolution of the United Kingdom is taking place at a legistlative level right now- if/when will Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland vote to actually secede? The article made mention that people in Britain are starting to get angry that they are subsidizing programs in Scotland that the English pay for themselves. What are the benefits to being a part of the United Kingdom? What's the best balance of power for all involved?

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:21 PM

This shift can reshape the countries in many ways, financially, and the over all quality of life. A place will do better with connections than standing alone. This may help with international relation issues and build new relationships. When places depend on one another it can reshape the Country. It can also help with investment and jobs. 

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Decades After Siege, Sarajevo Still Divided

Decades After Siege, Sarajevo Still Divided | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Twenty years ago this week, the Bosnian war began with the siege of Sarajevo, the longest in the history of modern warfare. The siege ended more than three years later, leaving 100,000 dead — the worst atrocities in Europe since World War II.

 

Ethnic and political conflict led to the disintegration of Yugoslavia in the 1990s.  This NPR podcast is a good recap that shows the devolutionary forces of ethnic, religious, cultural and political differences that led to tragic violence and ethnic cleansing. 


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Derek Ethier's comment, October 11, 2012 1:59 AM
It's unbelievable that ethnic crimes continue to be committed in the world today, even after the atrocities performed by Hitler. When Yugoslavia collapsed, the power vacuum left behind caused hundreds of thousands to lose their lives. In Africa even in the present day, these kinds of things continue. It makes you wonder what kind of a world we are really living in.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:54 PM

These stories are never pleasant.  It seems Europe after World War II and the fall of the Soviet Union were left in a strange middle ground.  With so many cultures, religions, languages all on one continent, its not hard to believe that Europe has been the stage of so much conflict all throughout history.  People are and always have been intermingling between countries.  Many of the countries in Europe are easy to travel throughout, such as a car or bus ride which may only take a few hours in some cases.  This gives easy access for immigration in which history shows that people try to flock to opportunity or to where there are people similar to them.  These patterns can sometimes be unwelcoming to current citizens and lead to violence and cleansing in extreme cases, all because of disagreements based on beliefs and traditions.

After all the wars fought, looking at Europe as a whole is tricky.  Though the countries all have political boundaries and jurisdictions, the lifestyle and what goes on within the borders can be very segregated.  Even in the 21st century, the divisions of people in the same country, holding the same citizenship, shows that things aren't always as good as they seem.

Devon marzo's curator insight, February 6, 12:37 PM

This article show political because the population is protesting against the government 

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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained


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chris tobin's comment, March 22, 2013 4:43 PM
Very clarifying information.......narrator really speaks quickly, like he just drank 5 pots of coffee and has to catch a plane or something...The You Tube Video 'Coffee The Greatest Addiction Ever' pops up next to his video
chris tobin's comment, March 22, 2013 4:43 PM
Very clarifying information.......narrator really speaks quickly, like he just drank 5 pots of coffee and has to catch a plane or something...The You Tube Video 'Coffee The Greatest Addiction Ever' pops up next to his video
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:10 AM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian.