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White deaths outnumber births in US

White deaths outnumber births in US | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
Deaths of white people outnumbered births for the very first time in US history, the Census Bureau revealed Thursday. The census predicts that significant drops in birth rates v death rates will be regular by 2025.

Via Seth Dixon
Cynthia Williams's insight:

Shrinking white demographics will definitely have an effect on voting blocks in the future.  I would not be surprised if redistricting becomes a very important issue in upcoming elections.  And why was there an attempt to down play the significance of this statistic in the NY Times.  Are they trying to hide this fact from the public? What do they think will happen when it is discovered?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 6, 2013 1:00 PM

The United States as a whole does not have demographic numbers similar to European countries with declining populations...but 'white' America does.  The NY Times also noted that this statistical benchmark happened, but it was quietly mentioned with many other demographic statistics without an analysis of how this will impact the United States.  

Question to Ponder: how will this impact the United States in coming generations?  What will the cultural, economic and political impacts be?  Why explains the differents between the distinct populations in the United States?


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsethnicity.

Sara Kanewske's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:08 PM

Population

Miles Gibson's curator insight, December 21, 9:14 PM
Unit 2 population and migration
This article explains the u.s. population change and how it's birth rate is lowering. In America the CDR was officially greater than the CBR for the first time ever. This was specifically for white people though. This article is a good example of a developed country entering stage 5 on the DTM.
This article relates unit 2 because it shows how the population in America is declining as a nation. This also proves how migration is what is sustaining the American population. The Crude death rate is finally higher than births on an odd occasion meaning America is entering stage 5 of the DTM.
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Humans and Nature: Can the Gulf Be Bridged?

Humans and Nature: Can the Gulf Be Bridged? | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
To grieve for the loss of something, the thinking goes, humans first have to develop a deep connection with it.
Cynthia Williams's insight:

We have to get over the notion that humans and the environment are separate.  The hole in the ozone is a perfect example of humans thinking that their actions don’t matter when it comes to the environment.  We are now suffering extreme weather patterns because of the hole in the ozone. 

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Recession Turns Malls Into Ghost Towns

Recession Turns Malls Into Ghost Towns | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
Traditional shopping malls are dwindling in number, with many struggling properties reduced to largely vacant shells.
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Cityscapes & urban landscapes by Anthony Gelot

Cityscapes & urban landscapes by Anthony Gelot | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it

Anthony Gelot, a cityscape photographer from France discovered photography late 2007 and it quickly became a passion of his.


Via Johann Barnard
Cynthia Williams's insight:

The way this is photographed who wouldn't want to live here.

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Exclusive: 4 in 5 in US face near-poverty, no work

Exclusive: 4 in 5 in US face near-poverty, no work | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
Four out of 5 U.S. adults struggle with joblessness, near-poverty or reliance on welfare for at least parts of their lives, a sign of deteriorating economic security and an elusive American dream. Survey ...
Cynthia Williams's insight:

Deteriorating economic security is changing the way our downtown areas look.  The tax base that once supported the downtown area is dwindling and so is the ability to keep many metropolitan downtown areas a thriving economic base.

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A2 Macro - Weak China trade data add to growth fears - Telegraph

A2 Macro - Weak China trade data add to growth fears - Telegraph | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
China's trade surplus fell 14pc in June as imports and exports both dropped unexpectedly, suggesting a further slowdown in the Asian economic giant on the back of global weakness.

Via Economics KSF
Cynthia Williams's insight:

It seems that China is feeling the global economic pinch too.

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Detroit rallies round the GAR once again and what that means for downtown

Detroit rallies round the GAR once again and what that means for downtown | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
The G.A.R. holds sway in the mind's eye. On the one hand, it is curious and odd, with its association to American Civil War veterans and their descendants. And then there is what looks to be a terribly impractical floor plan.
Cynthia Williams's insight:

Attempts at revitalizing downtown Detroit may lead to a renaissance for the city.  Any attempt to stop urban decline in that area should be looked at closely. 

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Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

"nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke..."


Via Seth Dixon
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Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:32 PM
As consumers, we never pay THAT much attention to how theproduct is manufactured, but only what's in it. Seeing this vide makes me wonder how many other well-known products are manufactured??
megan b clement's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:40 AM

"The video displays the maufacturing and distribution of the Coca Cola product globally. Goal is to put Coke in all hands and they need ultimate factories for distribution. For non-alcoholic beverage market Coke is number 1. They produce 800 servings a day and Coke does about 670 billion dollars in sales a year. There recipe is the best kept secret, they use words like natural flavors that help keep the recipe a secret. Logistics, cheap labor, and cheap transportation are key to maximize every dollar. "

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:57 PM

I can't believe how much money this company makes in a single year. The people in this country must have some serious kidney stones lol. But on a serious note, this company definately has a good strategy on how to minimize cost transportation, because to transport 4.5 million servings that Coca Col makes in a single day, let alone, a year, must be quite expensive and time consuming. Not to mention that they distribute their products in 206 countries, they legit serve 99% of mankind. No wonder they make $670 Billion. 

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‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’

‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’ | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
The filmmakers present a 12-step program to establish the world’s newest country: South Sudan.

Via Seth Dixon
Cynthia Williams's insight:

I don’t think that Northern Sudan is going to relinquish control of South Sudan that easily.  I am going to employ the wait and see attitude to this “Hot Spot” issue. 

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:54 PM

If I was to create my own country, the first thing I'd do is make sure not to shoot down any U.N. helicopters. This video does show the very hard process of creating a country from scratch.  I particularly enjoy the piece in which a government official attempts to explain taxes to folks at the marketplace because I probably had the same expression when taxes were first explained to me. "Why should I pay the government my hard earned money? They didn't do anything to earn it from me."

 

Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 12:51 PM

This is a really interesting dynamic to look into, as it's not everyday the process of founding a country can be seen at work. That's a true once in a lifetime experience for those involved, and is likely one of the harder jobs in the entirety of history.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 10:46 AM

This video and article highlight the steps a new country takes when it is carved out of an old one.  The problems and tribulations the new country faces and how it responds to the rest of the international community will decide if it will be a long lasting country or just a blip on the road of the original countries history.

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The Europeanization of America

The Europeanization of America | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
The truth is that while values and interests have divided Europeans and Americans, it is austerity and the prospect of decline that have brought them back together.

Via Arno Neumann
Cynthia Williams's insight:

The fear that both America and Europe are declining nations has created a bond between both continents.  We are both experiencing economic problems and issues with foreign policy so it altogether fitting that we look for comfort from the people we think are most like us.

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Arno Neumann's curator insight, February 26, 2013 12:51 AM

Well seasoned observations. A decade makes a huge difference. The pollitics of diplomacy now moveminds to act differently, not primarily military to move the minions.

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How language transformed humanity

TED Talks Biologist Mark Pagel shares an intriguing theory about why humans evolved our complex system of language.

 

Why is language such a critical component to human cultures and the technologies that we have created?  Why did linguistic diversity exist in great abundance 500 years ago but is now increasingly shrinking?  What is the future geography of languages on Earth going to look like? 


Via Seth Dixon
Cynthia Williams's insight:

And if we did choose one language that would be the world standard what would it be?  I would guess that the Western cultures would demand English.  But why should English be the standard?

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Geography: What in the World is it?

The Brigham Young University Geography Department explains what geography is all about.  As a graduate of that department, it puts a smile on my face. 


Via Seth Dixon
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The Health Toll of Immigration

The Health Toll of Immigration | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
A growing body of mortality research on immigrants has shown that the longer they live in the United States, the worse their rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.
Cynthia Williams's insight:

Unfortunately many immigrants are no longer privy to food that comes directly from the earth.  Processed food is far less healthy than food that comes directly from a garden and so with processed food they are exposed to health issues.

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China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities

China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
A 12-year plan to move hundreds of millions of rural residents into cities is intended to spur economic growth, but could have unintended consequences, skeptics warn.

Via geographil
Cynthia Williams's insight:

So now China is forcing people to move to the city.  What is going to happen to the agricultural land they left behind?  How are they going to be able to feed them, cloth them, create new jobs and train them for these jobs?  They have opened up a huge can of worms they are not ready to tackle.

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Magid: How tech helps and harms our environment

Magid: How tech helps and harms our environment | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
As we get ready to celebrate Earth Day next week, I cant help think about how technology both helps and harms our environment.

Via Susan Davis Cushing
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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

Via Seth Dixon, Ramy Jabbar رامي
Cynthia Williams's insight:

 

I am drawn to urban housing patterns.  I could care less about a having a big lot.  I don’t want to take care of a lawn.  I like the feel of living in a city and the fact that you can go out at night and find things to do.  One of the main advantages to living in Providence is you can walk to your destination.  There are more tall buildings in the city and more traffic than in suburbia.  If roads are not well laid out traffic problems could arise.  Issues with pollution from vehicle emissions could impact residents.  Noise could also be a factor.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
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Life in the City: Urban areas struggle to attract families, downtown housing ... - MiBiz

Life in the City: Urban areas struggle to attract families, downtown housing ... - MiBiz | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
Life in the City: Urban areas struggle to attract families, downtown housing ...
MiBiz
But urban planners and real estate professionals are left wondering: How can cities better attract families to live in the core urban areas?

Via TheAchieversGrp
Cynthia Williams's insight:

Downtown LA is not really a place where families can find adequate housing.  It is skyscraper, business, financial district, heaven.  The train station is a tourist destination and traffic is a nightmare.  But city planners are looking for ways to get families to relocate to the downtown area.  The question is how are they going to achieve their goal without detracting from the LA vibe?

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"Political Landscapes"

"Political Landscapes" | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it

While touring Kevin Babola's art studio yesterday, I found this thought-provoking piece entitled ‘Political Landscapes.’ I greatly enjoyed my conversation with the artist about the political, economic and urban visions that went into this painting.  The conceptual idea behind this painting started when the artist was exploring the neighborhoods of New Bedford, MA and noticed how a sense of place can change very quickly. I dare say most cities have areas similar to the one portrayed here where the socioeconomic character changes very abruptly. While physically it might be very easy to cross from the side of the street with tenements to the neighborhood with single family homes, making that transition permanent is incredibly difficult.

 

Questions to ponder: what leads to cities having abrupt changes in the urban fabric? What might this chasm represent to people on either side of the divide? How does this impact the neighborhood institutions (schools, local government, etc.)?  Please visit the artist's webpage at: http://www.kbolaillustration.com


Via Seth Dixon
Cynthia Williams's insight:

The picture ‘Political Landscapes,’ is a portrait of the haves and the have not’s and it illustrates the widening chasm of socioeconomic levels with the top 1% gaining and the rest steadily losing ground.  

 

The decline of industry very often leads to the decline in jobs, schools and local government.  With the erosion of the tax base cities are no longer able to maintain these institutions.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2013 1:03 PM

While touring Kevin Babola's art studio yesterday, I found this thought-provoking piece entitled ‘Political Landscapes.’ I greatly enjoyed my conversation with the artist about the political, economic and urban visions that went into this painting.  The conceptual idea behind this painting started when the artist was exploring the neighborhoods of New Bedford, MA and noticed how a sense of place can change very quickly. I dare say most cities have areas similar to the one portrayed here where the socioeconomic character changes very abruptly. While physically it might be very easy to cross from the side of the street with tenements to the neighborhood with single family homes, making that transition permanent is incredibly difficult.

 

Questions to ponder: what leads to cities having abrupt changes in the urban fabric? What might this chasm represent to people on either side of the divide? How does this impact the neighborhood institutions (schools, local government, etc.)?  Please visit the artist's webpage at: http://www.kbolaillustration.com

Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 8:41 AM
this picture meant a lot to me simple due to the fact that I've lived in the city of providence for the last three years now. everywhere I look in the city shows an identical view to this picture that protrays inner-city compact houses vs grass and space of the kind of suburbs. on the right is the inner-city version where houses are only separated by a one car width driveway and are two to three stores high to accommadate more families and people. the left side of the picture protrays a more suburb area of the city. but this area isn't necessarily the suburbs because it would be an area just minute outside of the busy city center like a north providence or east providence area. in north providence yes you technically have a yard and grass but it is so small that you mine as well have scissors to cut the lawn. with a bite more space houses being more single family oriented this is more luxurious than the left side of the picture
Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:27 PM

This pictures shows the difference between the city and suburbs. Even in the same city, you can  have some parts that look more economically wealthier. But looking at it from a political view, I would guess that the whole in the ground that divides the two neighborhoods would be the line that divides democrats and republicans. City folk tend to vote more democrat because they want the government to assist the people. WHile Republicans tend to look out more for themselves.

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A2 Macro - The ghost towns of Spain: Images that are desolate symbols of collapsed property market

A2 Macro - The ghost towns of Spain: Images that are desolate symbols of collapsed property market | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
With its empty streets, bricked-up shops and deserted playgrounds, the sprawling residential development of Sesena has become a ghost town and a desolate symbol of the collapse of Spain's property market.
Cynthia Williams's insight:

This could be a picture of Detroit in the United States.  The" Ghost Town Syndrome," is spanning the globe driven by declining industry, a lack of economic diversification and a lackluster global economy.

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The Detroit Bus Company

"Young entrepreneur Andy Didorosi believes that the way to Detroit’s new era depends on better leadership and a solid connection between the city and the suburbs. The city in 2012 axed its plans to build the M-1 light rail, the transit solution that would’ve bridged that vital connection, Didorosi bought a bus, had a local artist trick it out with a wicked mural, and he started the Detroit Bus Company.  Dedicated to a more connected city, Andy Didorosi is bringing Detroit home one ride at a time."


Via Seth Dixon
Cynthia Williams's insight:

Andy is creating a transportation system for the new Detroit.  Once the inevitable downsize takes place his idea for transportation could take off.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:41 AM

In the 1950s, Detroit was the 4th largest city in the US with a population around 2 million as seen in some vintage footage of Detroit.  As de-industrialization process restructured the US economy, globalization restructured the world’s economy, and Detroit’s local economic strategy crumbledThe tax base continued to shrink, city services were spread thin and the poor services encouraged people to migrate elsewhere, leaving current homeowners unable to sell their homes at a fair price.  Today, Detroit is $18-20 million in debt with a population around 700,000 and is unable to pull out of this nosedive.  Detroit filed for bankruptcy July 18, 2013 and became the largest U.S. city ever to file for bankruptcy and more importantly the first major American city to essentially fail (photo gallery of 'ruin photography'). 


With all this sad news, there are still glimmers of sucess as seen in this video.  Some entrepreneurs and local have stepped in as the city government has been unable to manage the needs of a large city creating organizations such as the Detroit Bus Company


Tags: transportation, urban, planning, poverty, communityeconomic, industry, Detroit

Jackie Hinton's comment, July 19, 2013 12:18 PM
love the video,didn't know detroit was in that bad of shape.
Betty Denise's comment, July 20, 2013 5:45 AM
http://www.marchandmeffre.com/detroit/index.html (Detroit détruite)
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NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner

NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it

"Americans ate 475 million pounds of tilapia last year, making this once obscure African native the most popular farmed fish in the United States."


Via Seth Dixon
Cynthia Williams's insight:

My concern is how safe is bioengineered food?  How has its nutritional content been altered?  Until some of our questions about bioengineered food can be answered by the FDA and other government officials I remain leery about the potential side effects that might occur from eating it and wonder how nutritious it really is.

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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:38 PM

How is the concept of agribusiness changing the way we think about food?

Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 9:04 AM

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape?


Tags: GMOsindustry, food, agriculture, agribusiness,

 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:59 AM
The video discusses how now alot of countries are industrially farm raising their fish. Tilapia is a perfect example Americans ate 475 million pounds of Tilapia last year. Ten years ago you would never even hear about Tilapia because it was not a popular fish. Times have changed how they raise them and then ship them out the video shows one of the farms where they grow the TIlapia.
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Why India Will Displace China as Global Growth Engine

Why India Will Displace China as Global Growth Engine | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it

Most of us still look at China, the world’s second-largest economy, as the undisputed leader among major developing countries. In the long run, however, I’m betting on India to emerge as the more significant global economy.
http://goo.gl/I2S33


Via Arno Neumann
Cynthia Williams's insight:

India has a better infrastructure than China; they are also the new frontier for sophisticated companies and technology.  I could see India replacing China as the second largest economy in the very near future.   

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Arno Neumann's curator insight, December 16, 2012 8:28 PM

AN : demographics are influencing economics in these two large population countries. The shift in power and influence may be subtle but  global trade in goods and services is dynamic and should never be taken for granted.

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Ecological sustainability, Challenges for Australia: population, Australia in its regional context, Geography Year 9, NSW | Online Education Home Schooling Skwirk Australia

Ecological sustainability, Challenges for Australia: population, Australia in its regional context, Geography Year 9, NSW | Online Education Home Schooling Skwirk Australia | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
Ecological sustainability, Challenges for Australia: population, Australia in its regional context, Geography, Year 9, NSW Introduction The physical environments that make up Australia have been protected and managed by Aboriginal people for at...

Via Jane Greenslade
Cynthia Williams's insight:

I would hope that Australia would try to preserve their ecosystems because once they are destroyed they can't be brought back.

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Demand Geography Education in Public Schools

Demand Geography Education in Public Schools | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
Encourage school districts to expand Geography Education...

 

Created by the NCGE (National Council for Geographic Education), this 'cause' will promote Geography in the Public schools...what better cause is there than that? 


Via Seth Dixon
Cynthia Williams's insight:

I had no idea what geography was until I took a course in college.  That is a sad commentary on the American education system. Why is geography missing from our school curriculum?

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Matt Del Cotto's curator insight, July 10, 2:45 PM

Geo isn't widely taught at public schools and many schools do not get funding for Geography departments. This link promotes Geo in public schools and tells us why Geo is import. Enjoy!

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The Geography of Government Benefits

The Geography of Government Benefits | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it
See the share of Americans’ income that comes from government benefit programs like Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, veterans’ benefits and food stamps.

Via Annette Montgomery
Cynthia Williams's insight:

I am becoming more and more frustrated with our government.  These benefit programs were designed to assist the poor, not greedy middle class people who are able to exist without the governments assistance quit well.  It is appalling that the poorest citizens in our country, who really need these benefits, have seen their assistance dwindle to only 39 percent of what it should be.

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RoofTop MicroFarms | Bringing organic, urban agriculture to the Island of Oahu

RoofTop MicroFarms | Bringing organic, urban agriculture to the Island of Oahu | GeographyfortheMasses | Scoop.it

Via FarmRoof®
Cynthia Williams's insight:

Roof top gardening in Hawaii is interesting in that it uses space that would not normally be used for farming.  Much of the produce that is sold in the grocery store in Hawaii is extremely expensive because it is imported.  When I lived there we preferred purchasing our produce from roadside stands or growing it ourselves.  But most people have limited space in which to grow things.  This idea puts unused space to good use and it allows people to feed their families with much less expense. 

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FarmRoof®'s curator insight, June 19, 2013 2:37 PM

Pleased to introduce the world to the 1st licensed FarmRoof® organization. These ecopreneurs represent our future, a future that is looking very bright!