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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


Via Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

This video was certainly disturbing to say the least.  There appears to be absolutely no worker safety whatsoever in China.  This has resulted of course in their economy soaring to new heights.  They don't have to pay these workers anything and they have virtually no safety codes to have them follow.  I am not sure this type of direction can last forever but it has certainly stood up for sometime. 

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 9:19 AM

This video shows a complete lack of concern for worker safety in China. The workers use the backhoe as a makeshift platform so one of them can cut the rebar suspending a massive piece of concrete from the side of the building. These kinds of shortcuts are the ways which China is able to keep a competitive edge in the world market. With hardly any regard for fair wages, worker safety, or worker rights, China is able to manufacture goods for prices no one else can compete with. Eventually, China will face opposition from its workforce as its industry matures and the government can either appease them or face revolution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:47 PM

In Beijing, workers safety is not a top priority. This video may shock viewers to the extreme levels workers will go to for such a small paycheck. This worker, many stories up climbs onto an excavator to be lowered down to a area that could not be reached. It is insane how these unsafe conditions compare to Americas. It makes you wonder how China has such a growing economy and a global leader when when things like this are happening on a day to day basis.

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 9:11 PM

(East Asia topic 6)
This video signifies two distinct characteristics of labor in China. First and most obviously is the disregard of safety. One could argue in the past that risks such as these were accepted by workers since China was a largely less-developed country with fewer employment opportunities; however, being a recent video and China  currently making exponential economic and developmental ground, this is definitely one of those 'things which shouldn't be happening'. With all of the nation's so-called "improvements," why are none discernible  here?

  Secondly, traits such as subservient respect are valued more in nations such as China. It is possible that if these workers hadn't have taken the risk and not completed the job, they would've been fired and had a somewhat 'tainted' reputation for not following their orders to demolish the building.

  Though it seems that all industrializing nations have gone through issues of workers' safety and reasonable expectations, China should use it's late-coming as a plus by learning from others which have gone before it, and avoiding the personal, legal, and even some social issues which have been faced before.

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Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed?

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed? | Geographyclass | Scoop.it

Scientists model where and when the debris from the March 2011 Japanese tsunami will be.  The likelihood that the debris (not radioactive) will reach the U.S. west coast is increasingly likely.  Look at the great video attached to the article.   


Via Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

It will be very interesting to see if this floating pile of junk actually reaches the west coast of the United States.  It seems possible that it could, but some of the scientists and other experts believe that it could also break up and sink before it reaches us.  One of my questions going in was whehter or not the wreckage was radioactive?  Luckily it is not radioactive and that should not be a concern for anyone. 

more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 5:02 PM

This video showed time elasped which stopped in the summer of 2013, it is now December.  At the time of the video the mass was entering the eastern part of the Pacific Ocean so I'm curious to where it is now.  I can't find any current imagery of the vast ocean but it would be a neat, yet dangerous spectacle.  I could only imagine any of the harm it's causing on the sealife on its way across the pacific.  We can only hope that doesn't bring too many issues once it washes up on the west coast, if at all.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:09 PM

Hopefully none of the wreckage that reaches the US is radioactive.... But the projected travel of the debris shows how ocean currents create, almost, a "natural" globalization of natural disasters. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 10:43 AM

Although it's important to know where all of this trash is headed, this just makes me think of how we might prevent this. We can't prevent these catastrophic natural disasters, but how might we lessen it's effects on our cities and settlements? Furthermore, how might we lessen our impact on ecosystems during these times of catastrophe? 

It's only called a catastrophe when it hits human populations for a reason, it's not just devastating to us. Remnants of our lifestyle are carried far and wide, able to cause harm on many other species. 

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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


Via Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

This video was certainly disturbing to say the least.  There appears to be absolutely no worker safety whatsoever in China.  This has resulted of course in their economy soaring to new heights.  They don't have to pay these workers anything and they have virtually no safety codes to have them follow.  I am not sure this type of direction can last forever but it has certainly stood up for sometime. 

more...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 9:19 AM

This video shows a complete lack of concern for worker safety in China. The workers use the backhoe as a makeshift platform so one of them can cut the rebar suspending a massive piece of concrete from the side of the building. These kinds of shortcuts are the ways which China is able to keep a competitive edge in the world market. With hardly any regard for fair wages, worker safety, or worker rights, China is able to manufacture goods for prices no one else can compete with. Eventually, China will face opposition from its workforce as its industry matures and the government can either appease them or face revolution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:47 PM

In Beijing, workers safety is not a top priority. This video may shock viewers to the extreme levels workers will go to for such a small paycheck. This worker, many stories up climbs onto an excavator to be lowered down to a area that could not be reached. It is insane how these unsafe conditions compare to Americas. It makes you wonder how China has such a growing economy and a global leader when when things like this are happening on a day to day basis.

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 9:11 PM

(East Asia topic 6)
This video signifies two distinct characteristics of labor in China. First and most obviously is the disregard of safety. One could argue in the past that risks such as these were accepted by workers since China was a largely less-developed country with fewer employment opportunities; however, being a recent video and China  currently making exponential economic and developmental ground, this is definitely one of those 'things which shouldn't be happening'. With all of the nation's so-called "improvements," why are none discernible  here?

  Secondly, traits such as subservient respect are valued more in nations such as China. It is possible that if these workers hadn't have taken the risk and not completed the job, they would've been fired and had a somewhat 'tainted' reputation for not following their orders to demolish the building.

  Though it seems that all industrializing nations have gone through issues of workers' safety and reasonable expectations, China should use it's late-coming as a plus by learning from others which have gone before it, and avoiding the personal, legal, and even some social issues which have been faced before.

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The Golden Temple of Amritsar

The Golden Temple of Amritsar | Geographyclass | Scoop.it
The Golden Temple is the holiest shrine of the Sikh religion. It is also home to one of the largest free eateries in the world.


This two-minute video clip is an effective portal to alternative religious traditions on the South Asian subcontinent.   While students might not at first relate to the theologies of diverse religious traditions, they connect with the underlying ethics of many world religions.  This video is an effective tool to help them gain greater cultural understanding and demystify unfamiliar cultural practices. 


Via Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

I was impressed by the fact that the people of the Sikh religion are very accepting of people who remain outside their system of beliefs.  They acknowledge the fact that there are other religions and don't see any reason to treat them with anything but respect.  These people are most definitely good people.

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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 7, 2012 3:25 PM
I like that the Sikh religion allows people of all religions to visit their holy temple. These people seem like good people.
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Viewfinder: Gaza's Tunnels

A World Report Viewfinder from inside the tunnels that connect blockaded Gaza to the outside world...

Why are tunnels from Egypt to Gaza forming?  How is Israel's policies a part of this phenomenon? 


Via Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

I think that these tunnels show the willpower of the Palestinians.  They are risking their lives on a daily basis in order to smuggle goods that Palestine could not obtain through normal means.  I think this video really shows the dangers that present themselves in these tunnels.  Israel has the right to monitor these tunnels and can very easily have them destroyed if they feel as though guns are being moved through them.  The people who move through these tunnels every day are quite brave.

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Derek Ethier's comment, October 25, 2012 10:33 PM
These tunnels to Gaza are truly amazing. It shows how the sheer willpower of a group of people can even outsmart or overpower an entire government. These tunnels are essential to the lives of Palestinians because they would not be able to obtain certain goods otherwise. However, Israel does seem to have the right to monitor and destroy these tunnels, especially when it is proven that such tunnels funnel in guns, ammunitions and other weapons. I do believe Palestine should be granted autonomy in some form or another.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 22, 2013 12:09 AM

Amazing to see what people will do to survive.  They are doing this out of necessity.  Many goods they are smuggling are what I believe should be allowed in through normal means, food, water, medicine and anything needed for basic human needs.  I understand the blockade in stopping weapons and items of that nature, but stopping basic foodstuffs is just plain wrong.  The people are living and surviving by these tunnels and built an economy on them.  One thing that was really interesting was at the end when the man seemed he wanted the blockcade to go on or else it would close his tunnel and he would have to get "a real job."  The effects of this blockcade are on both ends of the spectrum, people want it to end so things can return to normal and others want it to go on to continue to make money.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:20 PM

What some media has led the "western world" to perceive is that many of the people living here would be trying to smuggle illegal goods such as bombs, drugs, etc.  Sure that may be true in some cases, but many times there are respectable citizens which simply need food or necessary items to sustain their lives.  Because of the tight security measures regarding people and goods, the people of Gaza simply try to find a way around the authorities, and the best current option is by tunnels.  Situations like this show that if people really need certain things, with some help and determination, they can achieve that goal.  In the end, hopefully it is for good more often than bad.

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Will There Be a Central Asian Spring?

Will There Be a Central Asian Spring? | Geographyclass | Scoop.it

Kazakhstan may not be ripe for revolution, but the West is making the same mistakes it made in the Arab world.


Via Amarji, Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

It bothers me that this is being over looked by our government.  If they are going to stand up and back the resurgance in Syria and Egypt then why are we not doing it here to?  All it would take would take is a backing from our government, but due to the ties that the have with the West, we are not stepping in.  This shows complete hypocrisy on our part. 

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Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:36 AM
It is sad to see Western nations ignoring Kazakhstan's drift into dictatorship as it ignores all democratic ways of governance. Since the current leader in charge is friendly with the west, powers like NATO do little to intervene. The hypocrisy behind it is that we did and said much more in Syria and Egypt where similar events took place.
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:36 AM

I couldn't view this article for some reason. It wanted me to subscribe to something.

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The Russian Cross

The Russian Cross | Geographyclass | Scoop.it

The economic and social turmoil after the fall of the Soviet Union was profound enough to be seen in the demographic statistics.  Birth rates dropped as the death rates went up.  Typically when birth rates drop it is presented as an indicator of social development, but it clearly is not in this instance.  What explains these statistics?  


Via Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

This certainly says a lot about the state of the nation.  It is clear that the collapse of the old government may have been to the disadvantage of the population.  I'm not sure if this has to do with the change from an authoritarian regime to a more capitalistic system, but it certainly could.  The numbers do speak for themselves.  Since the collapse of the Soviet Union deaths have risen while births and natural growth have dropped off considerably.  Undoubtedly, social developement is playing a role in the drop off.  The switch in regimes should have been the beginning a a large social developement. 

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 3:15 PM

This shows how negative problems in Russia, like Alcoholism, suicide, crime, job loss etc negatively effect population growth. The Russian Cross shows how birthrates and death rates inverted during the collapse of communism. It looks to be stabilizing but this graph reflects how population geography can indicate societal characteristics.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 10:37 PM

There is a proliphic correlation between the fall of the Soviet Union and the population rate in Russia. Sometimes it takes statistical images to get a particular message across. With a decrease in male life expectancy,increase in alcoholism as well as an increase in suicide and crime is it is apparent the fall of the "Iron curtain" had an extensive shock wave. In a country with a small population in comparison to it's size this is a astronomical decline.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 20, 9:30 PM

(Russia topic 4)

The "Russian Cross" refers to the point at which Russia's population began to shrink. The number of births 'crossed' beneath the number of deaths occurring in a given period of time. Coinciding with the USSR's collapse, this decline in population hinted at a tougher future for the nation. More elderly and fewer young signify a greater dependency upon those who work, causing more of an economic strain. Ironically, this seems to echo the effects of the American 'baby boomers' as they have been approaching retiring age now. Though other factors are certainly involved, it is interesting to note how different situations as these can have such similar outcomes.

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Brazil Faces Obstacles in Preparations for Rio Olympics

Brazil Faces Obstacles in Preparations for Rio Olympics | Geographyclass | Scoop.it

It's interesting that a government seems willing to demolish a neighborhood in the hopes of creating more space for the world cup and the olympic games.  I understand what the government is doing.  Brazil feels like they are a growing nation, whose hosting of both major events will boost their place on a global scale.  Does this mean then, that the government is right to simply push aside almost 4,000 people in one section of Rio simply to create more space?  I certainly do not believe that.  Imagine if New York were hosting the games, and wished for a large section of long island to clear out in order to create more space.  Would the citizens of New York have a problem with it?  They absolutely would.  Hosting the olympic games at the expense of your people's lives is utterly ridiculous. 

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:24 PM

The people protesting the destruction of their homes in the slums of Brazil are right to do so.  The government wants to destroy homes that while they are shabby, have been host to more than one generation of some families strictly so they may host the FIFA World Cup 2014 and the 2016 Summer Olympics.  I understand that government is glad to host these events because it will bring tourism to the country and bring in large profits but in doing this, they are neglecting their own people!

Brazil is not in a good financial state to take on the endeavors of building the stadiums and hosting the massive crowds that come to both events.  Rio de Janeiro also has a very high crime rate.  Destroying the favelas to clean up the city and make more space will only displace the poor and lead to further problems for the country because before a nation focuses on the rest of the world, it needs to secure and take care of itself and Brazil is not doing so. It is cruel politics to displace thousands of people and will not do any good after the few weeks of the Olympics comes to an end and Brazil is left with another mess to clean up.

Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 11:41 AM

With the Olympics comes countries trying to hide all their dirty secrets that they don't want the world to see. It's easy to say that money shouldn't be spent on creating a large stadium and instead to help the impoverished, but it should also be recognized that with the Olympics comes a huge boost in jobs and tourism for the country.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 10:33 AM

This article highlights the problem facing Brazil when the country needs to build new facilities to host the Olympics and World Cup.  The clash between the government and poor people who are squatting on land they do not own causes much stress and unrest.  How the country comes to resolve these issues are important for the people in the future.  The fact that people are being displaced is sad and perhaps not fair however, on the other hand, these people are squatters and built their homes on land they did not own and have no infrastructure which is also dangerous and a public safety issue.  The unrest over this issue will cause a pale over the games to be held in Brazil.

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"Pink Slime" - Mechanically Separated Meat

"Pink Slime" - Mechanically Separated Meat | Geographyclass | Scoop.it

I found this article to be quite disturbing mainly due to the fact that I know my government is allowing it.  Is this pink stuff even meat that I should be eating.  This is certainly not something that should be taken very lightly by anyone as this is food that undoubtedly everyone has consumed. 

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:57 PM

That is gross how people eat that. it is amazing how people are blind to what they eat like this pink slime all these fast food chains are accused of selling to consumers. Now I have avoided eating at those places because of this. Now I eat out at Chipotle or Wendy’s or little local food businesses.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 12:56 PM

Even though this article was published last year, It is still a serious issue with the meat supply in North America. As discussed in class, only 2% of the work force is involved with agriculture. One of the primary reasons for migrating on the East coast, and Middle of the country, was because of its climate and soil, perfect for growing crops. Over the years our country has taken a serious turn with our food. We are trying to produce more food per worker and square foot of land and its only hurting us. This pink slime, ammonia-treated meat is treated in the first place so it kills any trace of ecoli. Which comes from cattle eating too much corn, which is what the cows in the country are fed, when their bodies are designed to eat grass, not corn. However, the US has lots of corn and so here raises a question, do we take care of our animals, give them enough grass to eat and sell Americans healthy beef? The answer is no, our food supply is a corporation burgers have to be sold and therefore the issue contines... 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 12:31 PM

I feel, generally speaking, that this is a result of our over-consumption of meat. If there wasn't such a high demand for meat these companies might not be looking into these sorts of alternative uses for these meat-like byproducts. The secondary reason for this is the negligence of personal accountability by officials and high paid USDA administrators that lack empathy and understanding of nutrition.

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Martin Luther King Street

Martin Luther King Jr. represented an end to violence and oppression.  So I too would like to know why his name is being placed on street signs in violent neighborhoods.  I understand that he was an African American who pushed for the rights of people like him, but this seems to be the opposite of what he stood for.

 

Tags: historical, culture, landscape, place, race, unit 3 culture, USA, urban, poverty, unit 7 cities, book review. 


Via Seth Dixon
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melissa stjean's comment, October 8, 2012 9:49 PM
These streets are the most popular in the country, but they are located mostly located in areas with profoundly poorer incomes. With poorer incomes, leads to increased crime rates, does naming a street after an iconic hero please the people who live here? It seems like the geography of these places is creating a line of segregation by using his name for a street.
Jeff F's comment, October 8, 2012 10:42 PM
Martin Luther King Streets are places into prominently African-American neighborhoods because that is where the dominant white culture says they belong. Martin Luther King jr was a powerful African-American man and a powerful African-American man has no place in white communities according to this philosophy. If a MLK street was to be placed into a white suburb it would likely cause controversy. Cries of myths such as "reverse racism" would likely run rampant. This would be accompanied with the idea that a MLK street should only belong in an area with a heavy African-American population.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:49 PM
I think Martin Luther King should be memorialized in all parts of the country, and why not with all cultures and races. He did stand for non-violence and non-discrimination, which happens among all types of people.
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Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers

Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers | Geographyclass | Scoop.it
Many companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila to take advantage of workers who speak lightly accented English and are familiar with American culture.

 

The geography of globalization is epitomized by relentless change and marked by continual turnover.  Cultural and economic factors play significant roles in creating potential advantages for receiving outsourced jobs (whether that is beneficially long-term is another discussion). 


Via Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

I liked this article simply because I could relate it to my own personal experiences speaking with someone at a call center.  I guess it is kind of interesting that the Phillippines has overtaken India in terms of number of call centers.  What was reallly interesting though was how familiar those at the call centers were of Americans. 

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 8:27 PM

Companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila because there the workers speak a lightly accented English and are more familiar with American culture then they are over in India. This shows the maturation of the outsourcing buisness and shows the preference for American English.  

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 12:41 PM

The fact that so many Filipinos speak English is an important one to understand. This brings jobs to the Philippines, but at the expense of local culture. High income and social standing in the Philippines is often correlated with English, as many of the high-ranking citizens attend universities in the United States and return with degrees, and in turn teach their children English. This marginalizes their own language in a way, and is something to keep aware of, as it's one thing that the United States does not face in many areas, that most other countries around the world do.  

 

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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

r A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.


Via Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

A few things really stood out to me in this video.  First off, the idea that people are moving into Dhaka for a better life, when in reality they are moving into slum life with no electricity or running water is very alarming.  It begs the question of whether or not moving to this megacity is really worth it.  The second thing that I was a bit surprised by was the fact that the mayor has pretty much no control over the city.  The city is overseen by the national government.  To think that urbanization has gained so much ground and continues to gain more ground is astounding. 

more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:21 PM

I recently did a project on the topic of megacities in the past, present, and future and how the natural risks they posed.  In past decades there was Tokyo, New York City, or even Mexico City.  I also covered present cities such as Shangai and Los Angeles to name a few.  The city that basically topped the growth charts in my statistics was Dhaka.  The city literally is growing like a chia pet, but with no direct plan or proper use of land.  According to future calculations, the city of Dhaka can reach roughly 23 million by 2025, that's about 600,000 new people coming in every year up until that point.  This video is just an example of how poorly planned this megacity is, and what the future holds for all of the people living there.  It's simply chaos.  There are already squatter settlements and unorganized living conditions for the current residents, picturing the population to grow even more is outrageous!

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 11:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

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From Victim to (Mutual) Aggressor: South Sudan's Disastrous First Year

From Victim to (Mutual) Aggressor: South Sudan's Disastrous First Year | Geographyclass | Scoop.it
The new African country, founded in part to escape from the northern government's violence, is showing some hostility of its own.

 

Independence for ethnic/religious groups, while culturally satisfying, does not necessarily solve all the problems within a region.  South Sudan's 1-year anniversary shows that even though they have a short history, it has been marked by ineffective governance and social instability.  


Via Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

One of the problems going on between Sudan and South Sudan is the same problem that other countries in Africa are suffereing from.  Sudan contained various different ethnic groups that all warred with each other for years.  When the powers of Europe divided up Africa they did not take the many different ethnic groups into consideration.  This caused many different ethnic groups to clash.  Despite South Sudan gaining its independence, it has not slowed down the conflicting beliefs of the various ethnic groups. 

more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 28, 2013 11:53 PM

This shows that gaining your independence might be hard, but the actual creation of the new state is harder.  Sometimes the new governement will impose the same methods the old "mother" country used that caused the split int he first place.  They need to ask themselves the hard questions about their actions: Are we turing into the old country?  Are we swapping one repressive and agressvie government for another?  Again one needs to look to the past, learn form it and not make the same mistakes..or else what I like saying...history will repeat itself.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:32 PM

This is probably a bad comparison, but say an expansion sports team has just been created for the new upcoming season.  There are new players, new equipment, and new managers to run the team.  Many of these new areas probably have little to no experience with each other professionally, so therefore flaws are inevitable.  In a way, the only way to go is up and mistakes which surely will be made can be used to change for the better in the future.  That being said, a new country with new officals, flags, and economy to name a few are all in a "trial run."  No one should expect them to suddenly become prosperous and great over a few years span.  Just like a new team, a country takes time to develop, people to gain comfort, and regulations and norms for people to follow.  I mean, even Rome wasn't built in a day.

Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 26, 2013 4:39 PM

This war could have been prevented. The Republic of Sudan and South Sudan are fighting over problems that may or may not exist.  Independence does not always solve the problems within a region, as shown in the case of South Sudan.  

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How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl"

How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl" | Geographyclass | Scoop.it
She was one of the world's most famous faces, yet no one knew who she was. Her image appeared on the front of magazines and books, posters, lapel pins, and even rugs, but she didn't know it.

 

While her image is iconic, her story is remarkably mundane and sadly representative of the many Afghan women who have lived in refugee camps. 


Via Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

While the picture may be famous, she still represents depressing life that the women of her generation live.  I found it interesting that she had no idea that her photo was so iconic.  To have a photo taken of you that was used in for a variety of different things, all while not knowing about it is quite shocking.  As famous as the photo is however, it should not cloud the symbolism that the photo stands for. 

more...
Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:31 AM
Refugee camps can obviously take a toll on one's life. This women, once beautiful, aged only 20 years. However, it looks as if she has aged at least double that. It is terrible that people have to live in refugee camps as war ravages their nation. Nobody deserve that, but those are collateral damages of war.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:39 PM

I'm so glad that National Geographic found such an exotic specimen in the wild and that the US government graciously put its technology to use to catalog her..... seriously the Western fascination with the image of this Afghan woman, 1 of insanely many, is something I don't get. I think it makes us all feel "cultured" and "informed" when we can sit in the comfort of a dentist or doctor's waiting room and breeze through a Nat Geo cover to cover. A cheap thrill.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:38 AM

Her face was a publicity stunt. Her story is sad and is brutal. She was in a refugee camp but her story is only one of many. She didn't know she was the face of National Geographic and people have the image of her in their minds when they think of Aghani women.

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How tiny Estonia stepped out of USSR's shadow to become an internet titan

How tiny Estonia stepped out of USSR's shadow to become an internet titan | Geographyclass | Scoop.it
The European country where Skype was born made a conscious decision to embrace the web after shaking off Soviet shackles Eesti keel | Estonian language version...

 

Can you imagine walking over 100 miles without losing your internet connection?  Estonia has done it by making internet access a public service along the lines of water and electricity.  The impacts and effects or profound considering that 9 in 10 Estonians have a computerized ID card that they can use to vote, transfer money and access all the information the state has on them.  Although this may sound very dystopian and authoritarian to many, Estonians argue that it actually empowers citizens to keep the state in check.      


Via Seth Dixon
Brian Nicoll's insight:

I actually like the idea of the computerized ID card.  Yes, undoubtedly from the outside looking in this does appear to have some big brother qualities but I think it's brilliant.  The card allows people to transfer money and vote.  It's also nice to see a country that doesn't just treat their internet use like a toy.  They use it to benefit their society, making it accessible to everyone in the country and not just those who can afford it. 

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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 15, 2012 1:23 PM
Wow i didn't realize that Estonia created Skype or that they are very dependent on the internet. Good for them, no more Soviet commands.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 13, 2013 10:43 AM

Just an amazing fact to see a county that was once under the controll of the USSR for so long as come so far.  Now a part of NATO and the EU Estonia has stepped out of the control of Russia to become a virbrant place to live.  Once independant and then under the contol of the USSR at the start of WW II it has once again become a nation itself.  Also notice a very different view in the article, the people there feel this electronic system lets them keep and eye on the government and not a big brother view many people in the US have over electronic ID systems.  Is it because they have always been use to being looked at by the government, ie the USSR over the last 50 years and because we are so use to freedoms that we have had for hundreds of years?

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 11:04 AM

I actually had no idea that Estonia birthed Skype. It was an amazing foresight that Estonia immediately jumped into the computer and internet age, and even more surprising that you can get Wi-fi across most of the country, no matter how remote. That's something that hasn't been accomplished in even the US. They had Internet in most schools by 1997 and can even vote online!

Rescooped by Brian Nicoll from Geography Education
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Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves?

Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves? | Geographyclass | Scoop.it

Scotland plans to hold a divorce referendum in 2014 to decide whether or not they wish to stay within the united kingdom or not.  Some say that this will have a profound effect on the British Currency Union.  While the seperatists of Scotland who wish to see this divorce take place are plenty, they certainly are not the majority.  According to a poll, only about 30% of the country wants this divorce to take place.  Because of this low percentage, it is unlikely that this divorce will take place, however it certainly raises questions regarding whether or not other countries will consider this same referendum in regards to staying in the European Union. 
 

 

Tags: devolution, supranationalism, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:27 PM

Good for Scotland... as anyone that has watched Braveheart knows, all they need is Mel Gibson to fight for their independence, and they will surely win!  I know some people that play the bagpies, and I like the Scottish music better than much English music.  I don't know much about the UK, so I have little to guide me in favor or against Scotland declaring independence, but aw heck, why not...  The US declared independence, and it seemed to work out for them until... whenever...? forever? it depends on what you use as criteria to look at it...  But live and let live, let people do what they want, the only advice to that is not to let people harm others.  That way, true peace can be achieved.  Harmony, instead of harm.  So I would advocate for Scotland to wear women's clothing with turtle shells in their crotches and dance to celebrate their independence if that's what they want, as long as there are no epic battle sequences that precede or follow their dancing.  Don't be an elitist, open your eyes, the governments own your brothers and their lives... We must work to change this.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 8:42 PM

I had the pleasure of actually meeting a couple from Scotland who was in favor of Scotland's independence. I asked them what they thought would happen to their relationship with England and the rest of the European union.  The woman told me that they were uncertain of what would happen exactly but it would still be worth the shot, that she was willing to risk it to just be Scotland, and the UK because she identified with Scotland.

Rescooped by Brian Nicoll from Geography Education
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Mexico's Drug Wars - Photo Essays

Mexico's Drug Wars - Photo Essays | Geographyclass | Scoop.it
Photographer Anthony Suau documents the surging influence of the drug cartels in Northern Mexico and the efforts by police to maintain law and order...

 

The mexican drug trade is something that I have found fascinating particularly because of how it pertains to the United States.  I recently saw a program on TV regarding how the Mexican drug Cartels of Tijuana have dealings with American gangs in the neighboring city of San Diego.  Some people don't see the Cartels as an issue because they reside in Mexico.  I think this shows how close to home they actually are. 


Via Roland Trudeau Jr., Seth Dixon
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 4, 12:37 PM

Anthony Suau photographs images that tell a thousand words of the drug wars and its influences. Drug trafficking is a major issue in Mexico and due to this, govenment has increased its actions, prostitution has increased as well as the death rate. It is one thing to read about these incidents, but it is another to see them. Military search through bags and pull people thrown into canals out.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 12:39 PM

This picture depicts the drug trade and how well it is or isnt regulated. Many officials are nervous about the drug trafficing and do not feel confident in enforcing the laws against drug cartel and drug trafficing. This photography depicts the efforts ofd the police to maintain order.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 28, 5:40 PM

This photo essay shows how much of an issue drug trafficking is in Mexico.  Not only is it more work and stress for their police and military but for average families as well. So many deaths are results of drug trafficking that it is an ordinary everyday occurrence. The food for guns program shows that no matter how poor or desperate they are they still have weapons.

Rescooped by Brian Nicoll from Geography Education
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Getting to know the world around us

Getting to know the world around us | Geographyclass | Scoop.it
I was finishing up my recent vacation to Finland , with one day in Helsinki visiting friends, when a novel thought for many Americans occurred to me: Look at a map.

 

This article explains the importance of geography education, and how a lack of geographic understanding limits students and professionals.  While this is nothing new to this particular audience; however it is another tool to use to convince administrators and politicians that geography education needs to be stregthened in this era of increased global connectivity.

 

Tags: GeographyEducation, geo-inspiration, globalization. 


Via Seth Dixon
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