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Water Crisis - Lesson Plans and Teachers Guide for High School through Elementary Grades

Water Crisis - Lesson Plans and Teachers Guide for High School through Elementary Grades | Geography Yr7 | Scoop.it
Teaching tools and resources about the water crisis and solutions to this critical development issue. Learn about water scarcity, sanitation and hygiene, and water quality in the developing world. Discover solutions such as wells and other water projects.
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Rescooped by Clare Rafferty from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YEAR 7 Water in the World
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The world has fresh water, but it's full of poison

The world has fresh water, but it's full of poison | Geography Yr7 | Scoop.it
Images of the typhoon-ravaged Philippines were terribly confronting, vividly conveying what an angry planet can dish up. But amid the destruction and death, an important point was largely missed: the world’s…

Via Lorraine Chaffer
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Rescooped by Clare Rafferty from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YEAR 7 Water in the World
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Managing groundwater for tomorrow

Managing groundwater for tomorrow | Geography Yr7 | Scoop.it
Seventy percent of Perth's water comes from underground. Imagine what would happen if that source of water dried up. It...

Via Lorraine Chaffer
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Rescooped by Clare Rafferty from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YEAR 7 Water in the World
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Infographic: Are We on the Path to Peak Water?

Infographic: Are We on the Path to Peak Water? | Geography Yr7 | Scoop.it

Many scientists and experts fear that humanity is reaching the point of peak water — the point at which freshwater is being consumed faster than it is being replenished or available. In the infographic above we take a look at the amount of water use around the world. Can we cut back before we reach the point of no return?


Kylie Schultz researched, wrote and produced this infographic as a participant in the Ensia Mentor Program. Her mentor for the project was Ensia director Todd Reubold. Infographic design and layout byAmber Billings.


Via Lauren Moss, Lorraine Chaffer
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Rescooped by Clare Rafferty from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YEAR 7 Water in the World
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Why global water shortages pose threat of terror and war

Why global water shortages pose threat of terror and war | Geography Yr7 | Scoop.it
From California to the Middle East, huge areas of the world are drying up and a billion people have no access to safe drinking water. US intelligence is warning of the dangers of shrinking resources and experts say the world is 'standing on a precipice'

Via Lorraine Chaffer
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Biodegradable and Non-biodegradable materials

Biodegradable and Non-biodegradable materials | Geography Yr7 | Scoop.it
Biodegradable and Non-biodegradable materials
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Rescooped by Clare Rafferty from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YEAR 7 Water in the World
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Every Last Drop – An Interactive Website about Water Saving

Every Last Drop is an interactive website which takes a detailed look at how much water we waste on a daily basis and how small changes can make a big difference.

Via Lorraine Chaffer
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Rescooped by Clare Rafferty from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YEAR 7 Water in the World
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NASA's global warming factsheet

NASA's global warming factsheet | Geography Yr7 | Scoop.it
Global warming is happening now, and scientists are confident that greenhouse gases are responsible. To understand what this means for humanity, it is necessary to understand what global warming is, how scientists know it's happening, and how they predict future climate.

 

Once the world’s fourth largest lake, the mighty Aral Sea is now in it’s death throws. Starved of it’s lifeblood of the waters of the Syr Darya and the Amu Darya rivers, the sea has been shrinking for the last 40 years.

 

Are the ozone hole and global warming related?What can we do about global warming?What if global warming isn’t as severe as predicted?Why is global warming a problem?Has the Sun been more active in recent decades, and could it be responsible for some global warming?If Earth has warmed and cooled throughout history, what makes scientists think that humans are causing global warming now?How do scientists know that Mauna Loa’s volcanic emissions don’t affect the carbon dioxide data collected there?Do satellite observations of atmospheric temperatures agree with surface-based observations and model predictions?What does NASA have to do with global warming?Are there natural processes that can amplify or limit global warming?If we immediately stopped emitting greenhouses gases, would global warming stop?If we stabilized greenhouse gas emissions at today’s rates, would global warming stop?
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Lorraine Chaffer
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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 8, 8:10 AM

It is an idiot who believes that humanity does not impact their own home through their activity.  It is also pretty stupid to select financial, material wealth over health, well being and sustainability, from a biological and sociological point of view.

 

Yet this is precisely what humanity has chosen to do.

 

At least, the sections of humanity who make decisions as to what happens in our world.  The rest of us are merely guilty of complacency and lack of access to real power (which is proactively enforced by those who currently hold defacto power in our world; the same people who are responsible for making the policy regimen that is causing global warming and greenhouse gas emissions to increase, remain the same or insignificantly decrease).

 

There's a reason how we're all going to die.  Looks like humanity is just going to be one brief little spark in the geological and cosmological history of our planet and universe.

 

A shame, since we have so much potential, if it weren't for those diseased brains sitting in places of power, consequence and authority.

 

Think about it.

Rescooped by Clare Rafferty from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YEAR 7 Water in the World
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UN-Water Statistics

UN-Water Statistics | Geography Yr7 | Scoop.it
UN-Water is currently working on the identification of a set of key indicators for the water sector that can be used at a global, regional and national level.

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV), Lorraine Chaffer
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, October 10, 2013 4:29 AM

Links to a myriad of resources here which touch nearly all the CDs.

Rescooped by Clare Rafferty from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YEAR 7 Water in the World
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The future of water in Australia

The future of water in Australia | Geography Yr7 | Scoop.it
Jeremy Fernandez looks at how we extract, move, store and use water in Australia.

Via Lorraine Chaffer
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